Frases de Toni Morrison

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Toni Morrison

Data de nascimento: 18. Fevereiro 1931

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Toni Morrison é uma escritora, editora e professora estadunidense.

Recebeu o Nobel de Literatura de 1993, por seus romances fortes e pungentes, que relatam as experiências de mulheres negras nos Estados Unidos durante os séculos XIX e XX. Seu livro de estreia, O olho mais azul , é um estudo sobre raça, gênero e beleza — temas recorrentes em seus últimos romances. Despertou a atenção da crítica internacional com Song of Solomon . Amada , o primeiro romance de uma trilogia que inclui Jazz e Paraíso , ganhou o Prémio Pulitzer de Ficçãode melhor ficção e foi escolhido pelo jornal americano The New York Times como “a melhor obra da ficção americana dos últimos 25 anos”. Morrison escreveu peças, ensaios, literatura infantil e um libreto de ópera.

Citações Toni Morrison

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„Wanna fly, you got to give up the shit that weighs you down.“

— Toni Morrison, Song of Solomon
Context: Too much tail. All that jewelry weighs it down. Like vanity. Can't nobody fly with all that shit. Wanna fly, you got to give up the shit that weighs you down. Guitar to Milkman on why a male peacock can't fly much better than a chicken. Song of Solomon (1977)

„Freeing yourself was one thing, claiming ownership of that freed self was another.“

— Toni Morrison, Beloved
Context: Bit by bit, at 124 and in the Clearing, along with others, she had claimed herself. Freeing yourself was one thing; claiming ownership of that freed self was another. <!-- ~ Ch. 9

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„There is just a little music, each other and the urgency of what is at stake. Which is all they had. For that work, the work of language is to get out of the way.“

— Toni Morrison
Context: Beginning Beloved with numerals rather than spelled out numbers, it was my intention to give the house an identity separate from the street or even the city... Numbers here constitute an address, a thrilling enough prospect for slaves who had owned nothing, least of all an address. And although the numbers, unlike words, can have no modifiers, I give these an adjective — spiteful… A few words have to be read before it is clear that 124 refers to a house … and a few more have to be read to discover why it is spiteful, or rather the source of the spite. By then it is clear, if not at once, that something is beyond control, but is not beyond understanding since it is not beyond accommodation by both the "women" and the "children." The fully realized presence of the haunting is both a major incumbent of the narrative and sleight of hand. One of its purposes is to keep the reader preoccupied with the nature of the incredible spirit world while being supplied a controlled diet of the incredible political world. … Here I wanted the compelling confusion of being there as they (the characters) are; suddenly, without comfort or succor from the "author," with only imagination, intelligence, and necessity available for the journey. …. No compound of houses, no neighborhood, no sculpture, no paint, no time, especially no time because memory, pre-historic memory, has no time. There is just a little music, each other and the urgency of what is at stake. Which is all they had. For that work, the work of language is to get out of the way. "Unspeakable Things Unspoken: The Afro-American Presence in American Literature" in Michigan Quarterly Review 28, no. 1 (Winter 1989)

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