Frases de Stanisław Lem

Stanisław Lem foto
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Stanisław Lem

Data de nascimento:12. Setembro 1921
Data de falecimento:27. Março 2006

Stanisław Lem foi um proeminente escritor polaco de ficção científica, filosofia e sátira. Ele foi Cavaleiro da Ordem da Águia Branca . Seus livros foram traduzidos para mais de 57 idiomas e venderam mais de 45 milhões de cópias.. Ele talvez seja mais bem conhecido como o autor do romance Solaris de 1961, que foi adaptado para o cinema três vezes. Em 1976, Theodore Sturgeon declarou que Lem era o autor de ficção científica mais lido em todo o mundo.

Sua obra explora temas filosóficos; especulação sobre tecnologia, a natureza da inteligência, a impossibilidade de comunicação e compreensão mútuas, desespero face às limitações humanas e o lugar da humanidade no universo. Estes são por vezes apresentados como ficção, e por outras na forma de ensaios ou livros de filosofia. Sua obra é de difícil tradução devido a sofisticadas formações de palavras e figuras de linguagem, destacando-se poesia e trocadilhos apócrifos de máquinas sencientes e vocabulário tecnológico fictício. Existem múltiplas traduções para uma mesma língua, que são alvo de constantes críticas; o próprio Lem criticou severamente a tradução de Solaris para o françês, que foi usada como base para a versão em língua inglesa. Poucos livros de Lem encontram-se traduzidos para o português de Portugal , enquanto no Brasil apenas Solaris é encontrado nas livrarias. Este artigo usa os títulos das traduções portuguesas disponíveis, e na falta delas os títulos das traduções para inglês ou os títulos originais.

Citações Stanisław Lem

„We take off into the cosmos, ready for anything: for solitude, for hardship, for exhaustion, death. Modesty forbids us to say so, but there are times when we think pretty well of ourselves. And yet, if we examine it more closely, our enthusiasm turns out to be all a sham. We don't want to conquer the cosmos, we simply want to extend the boundaries of Earth to the frontiers of the cosmos. For us, such and such a planet is as arid as the Sahara, another as frozen as the North Pole, yet another as lush as the Amazon basin. We are humanitarian and chivalrous; we don't want to enslave other races, we simply want to bequeath them our values and take over their heritage in exchange. We think of ourselves as the Knights of the Holy Contact. This is another lie. We are only seeking Man. We have no need of other worlds. A single world, our own, suffices us; but we can't accept it for what it is. We are searching for an ideal image of our own world: we go in quest of a planet, a civilization superior to our own but developed on the basis of a prototype of our primeval past. At the same time, there is something inside us which we don't like to face up to, from which we try to protect ourselves, but which nevertheless remains, since we don't leave Earth in a state of primal innocence. We arrive here as we are in reality, and when the page is turned and that reality is revealed to us - that part of our reality which we would prefer to pass over in silence - then we don't like it anymore.“

— Stanisław Lem
Solaris

„Tell me something. Do you believe in God?'

Snow darted an apprehensive glance in my direction. 'What? Who still believes nowadays?'

'It isn't that simple. I don't mean the traditional God of Earth religion. I'm no expert in the history of religions, and perhaps this is nothing new--do you happen to know if there was ever a belief in an... imperfect God?'

'What do you mean by imperfect?' Snow frowned. 'In a way all the gods of the old religions were imperfect, considered that their attributes were amplified human ones. The God of the Old Testament, for instance, required humble submission and sacrifices, and and was jealous of other gods. The Greek gods had fits of sulks and family quarrels, and they were just as imperfect as mortals...'

'No,' I interrupted. 'I'm not thinking of a god whose imperfection arises out of the candor of his human creators, but one whose imperfection represents his essential characteristic: a god limited in his omniscience and power, fallible, incapable of foreseeing the consequences of his acts, and creating things that lead to horror. He is a... sick god, whose ambitions exceed his powers and who does not realize it at first. A god who has created clocks, but not the time they measure. He has created systems or mechanisms that serves specific ends but have now overstepped and betrayed them. And he has created eternity, which was to have measured his power, and which measures his unending defeat.'

Snow hesitated, but his attitude no longer showed any of the wary reserve of recent weeks:

'There was Manicheanism...'

'Nothing at all to do with the principles of Good and Evil,' I broke in immediately. 'This god has no existence outside of matter. He would like to free himself from matter, but he cannot...'

Snow pondered for a while:

'I don't know of any religion that answers your description. That kind of religion has never been... necessary. If i understand you, and I'm afraid I do, what you have in mind is an evolving god, who develops in the course of time, grows, and keeps increasing in power while remaining aware of his powerlessness. For your god, the divine condition is a situation without a goal. And understanding that, he despairs. But isn't this despairing god of yours mankind, Kelvin? Is it man you are talking about, and that is a fallacy, not just philosophically but also mystically speaking.'

I kept on:

'No, it's nothing to do with man. man may correspond to my provisional definition from some point of view, but that is because the definition has a lot of gaps. Man does not create gods, in spite of appearances. The times, the age, impose them on him. Man can serve is age or rebel against it, but the target of his cooperation or rebellion comes to him from outside. If there was only a since human being in existence, he would apparently be able to attempt the experiment of creating his own goals in complete freedom--apparently, because a man not brought up among other human beings cannot become a man. And the being--the being I have in mind--cannot exist in the plural, you see?... Perhaps he has already been born somewhere, in some corner of the galaxy, and soon he will have some childish enthusiasm that will set him putting out one star and lighting another. We will notice him after a while...'

'We already have,' Snow said sarcastically. 'Novas and supernovas. According to you they are candles on his altar.'

'If you're going to take what I say literally...'

... Snow asked abruptly:

'What gave you this idea of an imperfect god?'

'I don't know. It seems quite feasible to me. That is the only god I could imagine believing in, a god whose passion is not a redemption, who saves nothing, fulfills no purpose--a god who simply is.“

— Stanisław Lem
Solaris

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