Frases de Rutherford B. Hayes

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Rutherford B. Hayes

Data de nascimento: 4. Outubro 1822
Data de falecimento: 17. Janeiro 1893

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Rutherford Birchard Hayes foi o 19º Presidente dos Estados Unidos entre 1877 e 1881. Como presidente, supervisionou o final da Reconstrução; iniciou os esforços que deram origem à reforma do serviço púbico; e tentou uma reconciliação entre as divisões originadas pela Guerra da Secessão e Reconstrução.

Hayes, advogado em Ohio, tornou o solicitador da cidade de Cincinnati entre 1858 e 1861. Quando a Guerra Civil começou, decidiu deixar a sua carreira política entediante, para se juntar ao Exército da União como oficial. Hayes foi ferido por cinco vezes, o mais sério deles na Batalha de South Mountain; ganhou uma reputação por bravura em combate, e foi promovido à patente de major-general. Depois da guerra, foi membro do Congresso de 1865 a 1867, do lado Republicano. Hayes deixou o Congresso para se candidatar a Governador de Ohio, e foi eleito por dois períodos consecutivos, entre 1868 a 1872, e um terceiro mandato de 1876 a 1877.

Em 1876, Hayes foi eleito presidente numa das eleições mais controversas e confusas da história nacional. Ele perdeu o voto popular para o democrata Samuel J. Tilden, mas ganhou um voto do colégio eleitoral, intensamente disputado, depois de uma comissão do Congresso lhe ter atribuído vinte votos eleitorais, muito contestados. O resultado foi o Compromisso de 1877, no qual os democratas aceitaram a eleição de Hayes, e terminaram com a intervenção militar na política do Sul. Este incidente causou o colapso dos estados governados pelos republicanos, e deu origem a uma sólida democracia sulista.

Hayes acreditava num governo de liderança pelo mérito, tratamento igual sem olhar à raça, e desenvolvimento através da educação. Em 1877, deu ordens às tropas federais para reprimir a greve dos ferrovias. Implementou reformas modestas no serviço público que abriram caminho a novas reformas nas décadas de 1880s e 1890. Vetou o Decreto Bland-Allison que propunha introduzir dinheiro de prata em circulação e aumentar os preços, insistindo que a manutenção do padrão-ouro era essencial para a recuperação económica. A sua política em relação aos índios antecipou o programa assimilacionista do Decreto Dawes de 1887.

Hayes manteve a sua garantia de não se candidatar a uma nova eleição, e retirou-se para sua casa no Ohio, para se dedicar à advocacia na área das reformas sociais e educacionais. O seu biógrafo Ari Hoogenboom refere que a sua grande conquista foi restaurar a confiança popular na presidência, e reverter a deterioração do poder executivo que se tinha instalado depois da morte de Lincoln.

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Citações Rutherford B. Hayes

„Uma invenção surpreendente, mas quem jamais iria querer usar um?“

—  Rutherford B. Hayes
That's an amazing invention, but who would ever want to use one of them? sobre o telefone; para Alexander Graham Bell depois de uma demonstração do telefone, conforme citado em "Future Mind : The Microcomputer-New Medium", New Mental Environment (1982) by Edward J. Lias, p. 2

„One of its [James A. Garfield’s assassination] lessons, perhaps its most important lesson, is the folly, the wickedness, and the danger of the extreme and bitter partisanship which so largely prevails in our country.“

—  Rutherford B. Hayes
Context: One of its [James A. Garfield’s assassination] lessons, perhaps its most important lesson, is the folly, the wickedness, and the danger of the extreme and bitter partisanship which so largely prevails in our country. This partisan bitterness is greatly aggravated by that system of appointments and removals which deals with public offices as rewards for services rendered to political parties or to party leaders. Hence crowds of importunate place-hunters of whose dregs Guiteau is the type. The required reform [of the civil service] will be accomplished whenever the people imperatively demand it, not only of their Executive, but also of their legislative officers. With it, the class to which the assassin belongs will lose their occupation, and the temptation to try “to administer government by assassination” will be taken away. Letter to Emile Kahn (1 October 1881)

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„War is a cruel business and there is brutality in it on all sides“

—  Rutherford B. Hayes
Context: You use the phrase “brutal Rebels.” Don’t be cheated in that way. There are enough “brutal Rebels” no doubt, but we have brutal officers and men too. I have had men brutally treated by our own officers on this raid [to Lynchburg, Va. ]. And there are plenty of humane Rebels. I have seen a good deal of it on this trip. War is a cruel business and there is brutality in it on all sides, but it is very idle to get up anxiety on account of any supposed peculiar cruelty on the part of Rebels. Keepers of prisons in Cincinnati, as well as in Danville, are hard-hearted and cruel. Letter to Lucy Webb Hayes, whose cousin was a prisoner and died at Andersonville prison (2 July 1864)

„My speaking is irregular. Sometimes quite good, sometimes not, but generally will do“

—  Rutherford B. Hayes
Context: My speaking is irregular. Sometimes quite good, sometimes not, but generally will do... I am too far along in experience and years both for this business. I do not go into [it] with the zest of old times. Races, baseball, and politics are for the youngsters. Letter to Lucy Webb Hayes (14 August 1875)

„As to Mr. Lincoln’s name and fame and memory, — all is safe.“

—  Rutherford B. Hayes
Context: As to Mr. Lincoln’s name and fame and memory, — all is safe. His firmness, moderation, goodness of heart; his quaint humor, his perfect honesty and directness of purpose; his logic his modesty his sound judgment, and great wisdom; the contrast between his obscure beginnings and the greatness of his subsequent position and achievements; his tragic death, giving him almost the crown of martyrdom, elevate him to a place in history second to none other of ancient or modern times. His success in his great office, his hold upon the confidence and affections of his countrymen, we shall all say are only second to Washington’s; we shall probably feel and think that they are not second even to his. Letter to Lucy Webb Hayes (16 April 1865)

„I know we are in frequent perils, that we may never return and all that, but the feeling that I am where I ought to be is a full compensation for all that is sinister, leaving me free to enjoy as if on a pleasure tour.“

—  Rutherford B. Hayes
Context: I never enjoyed any business or mode of life as much as I do this. I really feel badly when I think of several of my intimate friends who are compelled to stay at home. These marches and campaigns in the hills of western Virginia will always be among the pleasantest things I can remember. I know we are in frequent perils, that we may never return and all that, but the feeling that I am where I ought to be is a full compensation for all that is sinister, leaving me free to enjoy as if on a pleasure tour. Letter to Lucy Webb Hayes (25 August 1861)

„The man who thinks that the perpetuity of slavery is essential to the existence of the Union, is unfit to be trusted. The deadliest enemy the Union has is slavery — in fact, its only enemy.“

—  Rutherford B. Hayes
Context: These semi-traitors [Union generals who were not hostile to slavery] must be watched. — Let us be careful who become army leaders in the reorganized army at the end of this Rebellion. The man who thinks that the perpetuity of slavery is essential to the existence of the Union, is unfit to be trusted. The deadliest enemy the Union has is slavery — in fact, its only enemy. Diary (5 June 1862)

„Disunion and civil war are at hand; and yet I fear disunion and war less than compromise.“

—  Rutherford B. Hayes
Context: Disunion and civil war are at hand; and yet I fear disunion and war less than compromise. We can recover from them. The free States alone, if we must go on alone, will make a glorious nation. Diary (4 January 1861)

„General Crook gave me a very agreeable present this afternoon — a pair of his old brigadier-general straps.“

—  Rutherford B. Hayes
Context: General Crook gave me a very agreeable present this afternoon — a pair of his old brigadier-general straps. The stars are somewhat dimmed by hard service, but will correspond pretty well with my rusty old blouse. Of course I am very much gratified by the promotion. I know perfectly well that the rank has been conferred on all sorts of small people and so cheapened shamefully, but I can’t help feeling that getting it at the close of a most bloody campaign on the recommendation of fighting generals like Crook and Sheridan is a different thing. Letter to Lucy Webb Hayes (9 December 1864)

„We people in camp are merely big children, wayward and changeable.“

—  Rutherford B. Hayes
Context: When the weather is bad as it was yesterday, everybody, almost everybody, feels cross and gloomy. Our thin linen tents — about like a fish seine, the deep mud, the irregular mails, the never to-be-seen paymasters, and “the rest of mankind,” are growled about in “old-soldier” style. But a fine day like today has turned out brightens and cheers us all. We people in camp are merely big children, wayward and changeable. Letter to Lucy Webb Hayes (23 November 1864)

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„Do what is natural to you, and you are sure to get all the recognition you are entitled to.“

—  Rutherford B. Hayes
Context: I have a talent for silence and brevity. I can keep silent when it seems best to do so, and when I speak I can, and do usually, quit when I am done. This talent, or these two talents, I have cultivated. Silence and concise, brief speaking have got me some laurels, and, I suspect, lost me some. No odds. Do what is natural to you, and you are sure to get all the recognition you are entitled to. Diary (20 November 1872)

„Is there anything in which the people of this age and country differ more from those of other lands and former times than in this — their ability to preserve order and protect rights without the aid of government?“

—  Rutherford B. Hayes
Context: Is there anything in which the people of this age and country differ more from those of other lands and former times than in this — their ability to preserve order and protect rights without the aid of government? … We are realizing the paradox, “that country is governed best which is governed least.” I no longer fear lynch law. Let the people be intelligent and good, and I am not sure but their impulsive, instinctive verdicts and sentences and executions, unchecked by the rules and technicalities of law, are more likely to be according to substantial justice than the decisions of courts and juries. Diary (23 July 1851)

„I have a talent for silence and brevity. I can keep silent when it seems best to do so, and when I speak I can, and do usually, quit when I am done.“

—  Rutherford B. Hayes
Context: I have a talent for silence and brevity. I can keep silent when it seems best to do so, and when I speak I can, and do usually, quit when I am done. This talent, or these two talents, I have cultivated. Silence and concise, brief speaking have got me some laurels, and, I suspect, lost me some. No odds. Do what is natural to you, and you are sure to get all the recognition you are entitled to. Diary (20 November 1872)

„My policy is trust, peace, and to put aside the bayonet.“

—  Rutherford B. Hayes
Context: My policy is trust, peace, and to put aside the bayonet. I do not think the wise policy is to decide contested elections in the States by the use of the national army. Diary (14 March 1877)

„You use the phrase “brutal Rebels.” Don’t be cheated in that way. There are enough “brutal Rebels” no doubt, but we have brutal officers and men too.“

—  Rutherford B. Hayes
Context: You use the phrase “brutal Rebels.” Don’t be cheated in that way. There are enough “brutal Rebels” no doubt, but we have brutal officers and men too. I have had men brutally treated by our own officers on this raid [to Lynchburg, Va. ]. And there are plenty of humane Rebels. I have seen a good deal of it on this trip. War is a cruel business and there is brutality in it on all sides, but it is very idle to get up anxiety on account of any supposed peculiar cruelty on the part of Rebels. Keepers of prisons in Cincinnati, as well as in Danville, are hard-hearted and cruel. Letter to Lucy Webb Hayes, whose cousin was a prisoner and died at Andersonville prison (2 July 1864)

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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