Frases de Richard Feynman

Richard Feynman photo
10   9

Richard Feynman

Data de nascimento: 11. Maio 1918
Data de falecimento: 15. Fevereiro 1988
Outros nomes: Richard Feynman Philips, Richard Phillips Feynman, Ричард Филлипс Фейнман

Richard Philips Feynman foi um físico norte-americano do século XX, um dos pioneiros da eletrodinâmica quântica, e Nobel de Física de 1965. É irmão mais velho da astrofísica Joan Feynman.

Obras

„Posso dizer seguramente que ninguém entende a física quântica.“

—  Richard Feynman, livro The Character of Physical Law

I think I can safely say that nobody understands quantum mechanics
The Character of Physical Law (1965) Ch. 6; MIT Press, 1967

„Os poetas reclamam que a ciência retira a beleza das estrelas. Mas eu posso vê-las de noite no deserto, e senti-las. Vejo menos ou mais?“

—  Richard Feynman, livro The Feynman Lectures on Physics

Poets say science takes away from the beauty of the stars — mere globs of gas atoms. Nothing is "mere". I too can see the stars on a desert night, and feel them. But do I see less or more?
The Feynman Lectures on Physics: Mainly Mechanics, Radiation, and Heat‎, de Richard Phillips Feynman, Robert B. Leighton, Matthew L. Sands - Publicado por Addison-Wesley, 1963

„A filosofia da ciência é tão útil para o cientista quanto a ornitologia para os pássaros“

—  Richard Feynman

Richard Feynman, conforme relatado por Singh, Simon - Big Bang - Editora Record - Rio de Janeiro / São Paulo - 2006. ISBN: 85-01-07213-3 (pág. 459)

„A Física está para a Matemática como o sexo está para a masturbação.“

—  Richard Feynman

Physics is to mathematics what sex is to masturbation
Richard Feynman citado em "Physically speaking: a dictionary of quotations on physics and astronomy"‎ - Página 215, Carl C. Gaither, Alma E. Cavazos-Gaither - CRC Press, 1997, ISBN 0750304707, 9780750304702 - 492 páginas

„Se você acha que entendeu alguma coisa sobre mecânica quântica, então é porque você não entendeu nada.“

—  Richard Feynman

If you think you understand quantum mechanics, you don't understand quantum mechanics.
citado em "Armageddon now: the end of the world A to Z‎" - Página 337, Jim Willis, Barbara Willis - Visible Ink Press, 2005, ISBN 0780809238, 9780780809239 - 450 páginas
Atribuídas

„A ideia é fornecer todas as informações, para que os outros possam julgar o valor de sua contribuição, e não apenas as informações que dirijam o julgamento para uma direção específica.“

—  Richard Feynman

Sobre escolhas seletivas na investigação científica.
como citado por Ben Goldacre em Ciência picareta; tradução de Renato Rezende, Rio de Janeiro: Civilização Brasileira, 2015, versão kindle, posição 1879.
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„God was always invented to explain mystery. God is always invented to explain those things that you do not understand.“

—  Richard Feynman

interview published in Superstrings: A Theory of Everything? (1988) edited by Paul C. W. Davies and Julian R. Brown, p. 208-209
Contexto: God was always invented to explain mystery. God is always invented to explain those things that you do not understand. Now, when you finally discover how something works, you get some laws which you're taking away from God; you don't need him anymore. But you need him for the other mysteries. So therefore you leave him to create the universe because we haven't figured that out yet; you need him for understanding those things which you don't believe the laws will explain, such as consciousness, or why you only live to a certain length of time — life and death — stuff like that. God is always associated with those things that you do not understand. Therefore I don't think that the laws can be considered to be like God because they have been figured out.

„What I cannot create, I do not understand.Know how to solve every problem that has been solved.“

—  Richard Feynman

on his blackboard at the time of death in February 1988; from a photo in the Caltech archives http://archives.caltech.edu/pictures/1.10-29.jpg

„I have a limited intelligence and I've used it in a particular direction.“

—  Richard Feynman, livro The Pleasure of Finding Things Out

" The Pleasure of Finding Things Out http://www.worldcat.org/wcpa/servlet/DCARead?standardNo=0738201081&standardNoType=1&excerpt=true", p. 2-3, transcript of BBC TV Horizon interview (1981): video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NEwUwWh5Xs4&t=2m53s
The Pleasure of Finding Things Out (1999)
Contexto: I've always been rather very one-sided about the science, and when I was younger, I concentrated almost all my effort on it. I didn't have time to learn, and I didn't have much patience for what's called the humanities; even though in the university there were humanities that you had to take, I tried my best to avoid somehow to learn anything and to work on it. It's only afterwards, when I've gotten older and more relaxed that I've spread out a little bit — I've learned to draw, and I read a little bit, but I'm really still a very one-sided person and don't know a great deal. I have a limited intelligence and I've used it in a particular direction.

„The real problem in speech is not precise language. The problem is clear language.“

—  Richard Feynman

" New Textbooks for the "New" Mathematics http://calteches.library.caltech.edu/2362/1/feynman.pdf", Engineering and Science volume 28, number 6 (March 1965) p. 9-15 at p. 14
Paraphrased as "Precise language is not the problem. Clear language is the problem."
Contexto: The real problem in speech is not precise language. The problem is clear language. The desire is to have the idea clearly communicated to the other person. It is only necessary to be precise when there is some doubt as to the meaning of a phrase, and then the precision should be put in the place where the doubt exists. It is really quite impossible to say anything with absolute precision, unless that thing is so abstracted from the real world as to not represent any real thing.Pure mathematics is just such an abstraction from the real world, and pure mathematics does have a special precise language for dealing with its own special and technical subjects. But this precise language is not precise in any sense if you deal with real objects of the world, and it is only pedantic and quite confusing to use it unless there are some special subtleties which have to be carefully distinguished.

„It is really quite impossible to say anything with absolute precision, unless that thing is so abstracted from the real world as to not represent any real thing.“

—  Richard Feynman

" New Textbooks for the "New" Mathematics http://calteches.library.caltech.edu/2362/1/feynman.pdf", Engineering and Science volume 28, number 6 (March 1965) p. 9-15 at p. 14
Paraphrased as "Precise language is not the problem. Clear language is the problem."
Contexto: The real problem in speech is not precise language. The problem is clear language. The desire is to have the idea clearly communicated to the other person. It is only necessary to be precise when there is some doubt as to the meaning of a phrase, and then the precision should be put in the place where the doubt exists. It is really quite impossible to say anything with absolute precision, unless that thing is so abstracted from the real world as to not represent any real thing.Pure mathematics is just such an abstraction from the real world, and pure mathematics does have a special precise language for dealing with its own special and technical subjects. But this precise language is not precise in any sense if you deal with real objects of the world, and it is only pedantic and quite confusing to use it unless there are some special subtleties which have to be carefully distinguished.

„We are not to tell nature what she’s gotta be. … She's always got better imagination than we have.“

—  Richard Feynman

Sir Douglas Robb Lectures, University of Auckland (1979); lecture 1, "Photons: Corpuscles of Light" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eLQ2atfqk2c&t=48m01s

„I learned very early the difference between knowing the name of something and knowing something.“

—  Richard Feynman, livro What Do You Care What Other People Think?

"The Making of a Scientist," p. 14 <!-- Feynman used variants of this bird story repeatedly: (1) "What is Science?", presented at the fifteenth annual meeting of the National Science Teachers Association, in New York City (1966) published in The Physics Teacher, volume 7, issue 6 (1969), p. 313-320. (2) Interview for the BBC TV Horizon program "The Pleasure of Finding Things Out" (1981), published in Christopher Sykes, No Ordinary Genius: The Illustrated Richard Feynman (1994), p. 27. -->
What Do You Care What Other People Think? (1988)
Contexto: You can know the name of that bird in all the languages of the world, but when you're finished, you'll know absolutely nothing whatever about the bird. You'll only know about humans in different places, and what they call the bird. … I learned very early the difference between knowing the name of something and knowing something.

„Our freedom to doubt was born out of a struggle against authority in the early days of science. It was a very deep and strong struggle: permit us to question — to doubt — to not be sure. I think that it is important that we do not forget this struggle and thus perhaps lose what we have gained.“

—  Richard Feynman

The Value of Science (1955)
Contexto: The scientist has a lot of experience with ignorance and doubt and uncertainty, and this experience is of very great importance, I think. When a scientist doesn’t know the answer to a problem, he is ignorant. When he has a hunch as to what the result is, he is uncertain. And when he is pretty darn sure of what the result is going to be, he is still in some doubt. We have found it of paramount importance that in order to progress we must recognize our ignorance and leave room for doubt. Scientific knowledge is a body of statements of varying degrees of certainty — some most unsure, some nearly sure, but none absolutely certain. Now, we scientists are used to this, and we take it for granted that it is perfectly consistent to be unsure, that it is possible to live and not know. But I don’t know whether everyone realizes this is true. Our freedom to doubt was born out of a struggle against authority in the early days of science. It was a very deep and strong struggle: permit us to question — to doubt — to not be sure. I think that it is important that we do not forget this struggle and thus perhaps lose what we have gained.

„We can deduce, often, from one part of physics like the law of gravitation, a principle which turns out to be much more valid than the derivation.“

—  Richard Feynman, livro The Character of Physical Law

Fonte: The Character of Physical Law (1965), chapter 2, “ The Relation of Mathematics to Physics http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M9ZYEb0Vf8U” referring to the law of conservation of angular momentum
Contexto: Now we have a problem. We can deduce, often, from one part of physics like the law of gravitation, a principle which turns out to be much more valid than the derivation. This doesn't happen in mathematics, that the theorems come out in places where they're not supposed to be!

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