Frases de Theodore Roethke

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Theodore Roethke

Data de nascimento: 25. Maio 1908
Data de falecimento: 1. Agosto 1963

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Theodore Huebner Roethke was an American poet. Roethke is regarded as one of the most accomplished and influential poets of his generation.

Roethke's work is characterized by its introspection, rhythm and natural imagery. He was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for poetry in 1954 for his book The Waking, and he won the annual National Book Award for Poetry twice, in 1959 for Words for the Wind and posthumously in 1965 for The Far Field.

In the November 1968 edition of The Atlantic Monthly, former U.S. Poet Laureate and author James Dickey wrote Roethke was: "in my opinion the greatest poet this country has yet produced."

Roethke was also a highly regarded poetry teacher. He taught at University of Washington for fifteen years. His students from that period won two Pulitzer Prizes for Poetry and two others were nominated for the award. "He was probably the best poetry-writing teacher ever," said poet Richard Hugo, who studied under Roethke and was twice nominated for a Pulitzer.

Citações Theodore Roethke

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„I knew a woman, lovely in her bones“

—  Theodore Roethke
Context: I knew a woman, lovely in her bones, When small birds sighed, she would sigh back at them; Ah, when she moved, she moved more ways than one: The shapes a bright container can contain! "I Knew a Woman," ll. 1 - 4

„Voice, come out of the silence.
Say something.“

—  Theodore Roethke
Context: p> Voice, come out of the silence. Say something. Appear in the form of a spider Or a moth beating the curtain.Tell me: Which is the way I take; Out of what door do I go, Where and to whom?</p The Lost Son, ll. 24 - 29

„The small become the great, the great the small;
The right thing happens to the happy man.“

—  Theodore Roethke
Context: God bless the roots! — Body and soul are one! The small become the great, the great the small; The right thing happens to the happy man. "The Right Thing," ll. 7-9

„I know the motion of the deepest stone.
Each one's himself, yet each one's everyone.“

—  Theodore Roethke
Context: p>Is pain a promise? I was schooled in pain, And found out what I could of all desire; I weep for what I'm like when I'm alone In the deep center of the voice and fire.I know the motion of the deepest stone. Each one's himself, yet each one's everyone.</p "The Sententious Man," ll. 31-36

„I'll seek my own meekness.
What grace I have is enough.“

—  Theodore Roethke
Context: I'll seek my own meekness. What grace I have is enough. The lost have their own pace. The stalks ask something else. What the grave says, The nest denies. "Unfold! Unfold!," ll. 59-64

„Light takes the Tree; but who can tell us how?“

—  Theodore Roethke
Context: Light takes the Tree; but who can tell us how? The lowly worm climbs up a winding stair; I wake to sleep, and take my waking slow.

„Snail, snail, glister me forward,
Bird, soft-sigh me home,
Worm, be with me.
This is my hard time.“

—  Theodore Roethke
Context: I shook the softening chalk of my bones, Saying, Snail, snail, glister me forward, Bird, soft-sigh me home, Worm, be with me. This is my hard time. "The Lost Son," ll. 8-11

„All lovers live by longing, and endure:
Summon a vision and declare it pure.“

—  Theodore Roethke
Context: Dante attained the purgatorial hill, Trembled at hidden virtue without flaw, Shook with a mighty power beyond his will, — Did Beatrice deny what Dante saw? All lovers live by longing, and endure: Summon a vision and declare it pure. "Four for Sir John Davies," ll. 73-78

„And everything comes to One,
As we dance on, dance on, dance on.“

—  Theodore Roethke
Context: p>And I dance with William Blake For love, for Love's sake;And everything comes to One, As we dance on, dance on, dance on.</p Once More, the Round," ll. 11-12

„To know that light falls and fills, often without our knowing.“

—  Theodore Roethke
Context: To stare into the after-light, the glitter left on the lake's surface, When the sun has fallen behind a wooded island; To follow the drips sliding from a lifted oar Held up, while the rower breathes, and the small boat drifts quietly shoreward; To know that light falls and fills, often without our knowing. The Shape of the Fire," ll. 88-92

„At Woodlawn I Heard the dead cry“

—  Theodore Roethke
Context: At Woodlawn I Heard the dead cry: I was lulled by the slamming of iron, A slow drip over stones, Toads brooding wells. The Lost Son, ll. 1-4

„Who stunned the dirt into noise?
Ask the mole, he knows.“

—  Theodore Roethke
Context: Who stunned the dirt into noise? Ask the mole, he knows. I feel the slime of a wet nest. Beware Mother Mildew. Nibble again, fish nerves. "The Lost Son," ll. 66-70

„Ah, when she moved, she moved more ways than one:
The shapes a bright container can contain!“

—  Theodore Roethke
Context: I knew a woman, lovely in her bones, When small birds sighed, she would sigh back at them; Ah, when she moved, she moved more ways than one: The shapes a bright container can contain! "I Knew a Woman," ll. 1 - 4

„We are afraid of what our eyes have seen:
For something is amiss or out of place
When mice with wings can wear a human face.“

—  Theodore Roethke
Context: He loops in crazy figures half the night Among the trees that face the corner light. But when he brushes up against a screen, We are afraid of what our eyes have seen: For something is amiss or out of place When mice with wings can wear a human face. "The Bat," ll. 5-10

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