Frases de Muriel Rukeyser

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Muriel Rukeyser

Data de nascimento: 15. Dezembro 1913
Data de falecimento: 12. Fevereiro 1980

Publicidade

Muriel Rukeyser was an American poet and political activist, best known for her poems about equality, feminism, social justice, and Judaism. Kenneth Rexroth said that she was the greatest poet of her "exact generation".

One of her most powerful pieces was a group of poems entitled The Book of the Dead , documenting the details of the Hawk's Nest incident, an industrial disaster in which hundreds of miners died of silicosis.

Her poem "To be a Jew in the Twentieth Century" , on the theme of Judaism as a gift, was adopted by the American Reform and Reconstructionist movements for their prayer books, something Rukeyser said "astonished" her, as she had remained distant from Judaism throughout her early life.

Citações Muriel Rukeyser

„The Universe is made of stories, not of atoms.“

—  Muriel Rukeyser
"The Speed of Darkness"; this line is sometimes misquoted as "The Universe is made of stories not atoms."

„Here is your road, tying you to its meanings“

—  Muriel Rukeyser
Context: Here is your road, tying you to its meanings: gorge, boulder, precipice. Telescoped down, the hard and stone-green river cutting fast and direct into the town. "The Road"

Publicidade

„Moment to moment, we can grow, if we can bring ourselves to meet the moment with our lives.“

—  Muriel Rukeyser
Context: Poetry is, above all, an approach to the truth of feeling, and what is the use of truth! How do we use feeling? How do we use truth! However confused the scene of our life appears, however torn we may be who now do face that scene, it can be faced, and we can go on to be whole. If we use the resources we now have, we and the world itself may move in one fullness. Moment to moment, we can grow, if we can bring ourselves to meet the moment with our lives. Chapter One : The Fear of Poetry

„Daring to live for the impossible.“

—  Muriel Rukeyser
Context: The whole and fertile spirit as guarantee For every human freedom, suffering to be free, Daring to live for the impossible.

„Poetry is foreign to us, we do not let it enter our daily lives.“

—  Muriel Rukeyser
Context: Poetry is not; or seems not to be. But it appears that among the great conflicts of this culture, the conflict in our attitude toward poetry stands clearly lit. There are no guards built up to hide it. We call see its expression, and we can see its effects upon us. We can see our own conflict and our own resource if we look, now, at this art, which has been made of all the arts the one least acceptable. Anyone dealing with poetry and the love of poetry must deal, then, with the hatred of poetry, and perhaps even Ignore with the indifference which is driven toward the center. It comes through as boredom, as name-calling, as the traditional attitude of the last hundred years which has chalked in the portrait of the poet as he is known to this society, which, as Herbert Read says, "does not challenge poetry in principle it merely treats it with ignorance, indifference and unconscious cruelty." Poetry is foreign to us, we do not let it enter our daily lives.

„The poetic image is not a static thing. It lives in time, as does the poem.“

—  Muriel Rukeyser
Context: The poetic image is not a static thing. It lives in time, as does the poem. Unless it is the first image of the poem, it has already been prepared for by other images; and it prepares us for further images and rhythms to come. Even if it is the first image of the poem, the establishment of the rhythm prepares us — musically — for the music of the image. And if its first word begins the poem, it has the role of putting into motion all the course of images and music of the entire work, with nothing to refer to, except perhaps a title. p. 32

„A poem does invite, it does require.“

—  Muriel Rukeyser
Context: A poem does invite, it does require. What does it invite? A poem invites you to feel. More than that: it invites you to respond. And better than that: a poem invites a total response. This response is total, but it is reached through the emotions. A fine poem will seize your imagination intellectually — that is, when you reach it, you will reach it intellectually too — but the way is through emotion, through what we call feeling. Chapter One : The Fear of Poetry, p. 8

„How shall we venture home?
How shall we tell each other of the poet?“

—  Muriel Rukeyser
Context: How shall we venture home? How shall we tell each other of the poet? How can we meet the judgment on the poet, or his execution? How shall we free him? How shall we speak to the infant beginning to run? All those beginning to run? "The Gates"

Publicidade

„I lived in the first century of world wars.“

—  Muriel Rukeyser
Context: I lived in the first century of world wars. Most mornings I would be more or less insane. "Poem"

„However confused the scene of our life appears, however torn we may be who now do face that scene, it can be faced, and we can go on to be whole.“

—  Muriel Rukeyser
Context: Poetry is, above all, an approach to the truth of feeling, and what is the use of truth! How do we use feeling? How do we use truth! However confused the scene of our life appears, however torn we may be who now do face that scene, it can be faced, and we can go on to be whole. If we use the resources we now have, we and the world itself may move in one fullness. Moment to moment, we can grow, if we can bring ourselves to meet the moment with our lives. Chapter One : The Fear of Poetry

„The meanings of poetry take their growth through the interaction of the images and the music of the poem.“

—  Muriel Rukeyser
Context: The meanings of poetry take their growth through the interaction of the images and the music of the poem. The music is not the rhythm, which is a representation of life, alone. The music involves the interplay of the sounds of words, the length of the sequences, the keeping and breaking of rhythms, and the repetition and variation of syllables unrhymed and rhymed. It also involves the play of ideas and images. p. 31

„Slowly I would get to pen and paper,
Make my poems for others unseen and unborn.“

—  Muriel Rukeyser
Context: Slowly I would get to pen and paper, Make my poems for others unseen and unborn. In the day I would be reminded of those men and women, Brave, setting up signals across vast distances, considering a nameless way of living, of almost unimagined values. "Poem"

Publicidade

„Poetry is not; or seems not to be.“

—  Muriel Rukeyser
Context: Poetry is not; or seems not to be. But it appears that among the great conflicts of this culture, the conflict in our attitude toward poetry stands clearly lit. There are no guards built up to hide it. We call see its expression, and we can see its effects upon us. We can see our own conflict and our own resource if we look, now, at this art, which has been made of all the arts the one least acceptable. Anyone dealing with poetry and the love of poetry must deal, then, with the hatred of poetry, and perhaps even Ignore with the indifference which is driven toward the center. It comes through as boredom, as name-calling, as the traditional attitude of the last hundred years which has chalked in the portrait of the poet as he is known to this society, which, as Herbert Read says, "does not challenge poetry in principle it merely treats it with ignorance, indifference and unconscious cruelty." Poetry is foreign to us, we do not let it enter our daily lives.

„In time of the crises of the spirit, we are aware of all of need, our need for each other and our need for ourselves. We call up our fullness; we turn, and act.“

—  Muriel Rukeyser
Context: In time of the crises of the spirit, we are aware of all of need, our need for each other and our need for ourselves. We call up our fullness; we turn, and act. We begin to be aware of correspondences, of the acknowledgement in us of necessity, and of the lands. And poetry, among all this — where is there a place for poetry? If poetry as it comes to us through action were all we had, it would be very much. For the dense and crucial moments, spoken under the stress of realization, full-bodied and compelling in their imagery, arrive with music, with our many kinds of theatre, and in the great prose. If we had these only, we would be open to the same influences, however diluted and applied. For these ways in which poetry reaches past the barriers set up by our culture, reaching toward those who refuse it in essential presence, are various, many-meaning, and certainly — in this period — more acceptable. They stand in the same relation to poetry as applied science to pure science. p. 169; part of this statement is also used in the "Introduction"

„Poetry is, above all, an approach to the truth of feeling, and what is the use of truth!“

—  Muriel Rukeyser
Context: Poetry is, above all, an approach to the truth of feeling, and what is the use of truth! How do we use feeling? How do we use truth! However confused the scene of our life appears, however torn we may be who now do face that scene, it can be faced, and we can go on to be whole. If we use the resources we now have, we and the world itself may move in one fullness. Moment to moment, we can grow, if we can bring ourselves to meet the moment with our lives. Chapter One : The Fear of Poetry

„We would try by any means
To reach the limits of ourselves, to reach beyond ourselves,
To let go the means, to wake.“

—  Muriel Rukeyser
Context: We would try to imagine them, try to find each other, To construct peace, to make love, to reconcile Waking with sleeping, ourselves with each other, Ourselves with ourselves. We would try by any means To reach the limits of ourselves, to reach beyond ourselves, To let go the means, to wake. "Poem" — these lines are among those quoted on the The Pacifist Memorial http://www.peaceabbey.org/memorial/memorial.htm

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