Frases de John Donne

John Donne foto
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John Donne

Data de nascimento: 1572
Data de falecimento: 31. Março 1631

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John Donne foi um poeta jacobita inglês, pregador e o maior representante dos poetas metafísicos da época. Sua obra é notável por seu estilo sensual e realista, incluindo-se sonetos, poesia amorosa, poemas religiosos, traduções do latim, epigramas, elegias, canções, sátiras e sermões. Sua poesia é célebre por sua linguagem vibrante e metáfora engenhosa, especialmente quando comparada à poesia de seus contemporâneos.

Apesar de sua boa educação e seu talento para a poesia, viveu na pobreza por muitos anos, contando demasiadamente com amigos mais ricos. Em 1615, tornou-se um pastor anglicano e, em 1621, foi nomeado decano da St. Paul Cathedral, em Londres. Alguns estudiosos acreditam que as obras literárias de Donne refletem as seguintes tendências: poesia amorosa e sátiras quando era mais jovem e sermões religiosos em sua velhice. Outros estudiosos, tais como Helen Gardner, questiona a validade desta periodização, pois muitos de seus poemas foram publicados postumamente . Exceção feita a Anniversaries, que foi publicado em 1612 e Devotions upon Emergent Occasions, publicado em 1623. Seus sermãos também são datados, algumas vezes de forma específica, informando dia, mês e ano.

Citações John Donne

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„Be thine own palace, or the world's thy jail.“

— John Donne, The Poems of John Donne; Miscellaneous Poems (Songs and Sonnets) Elegies. Epithalamions, or Marriage Songs. Satires. Epigrams. the Progress of

„I wonder, by my troth, what thou and I
Did, till we loved?“

— John Donne
Context: p>I wonder, by my troth, what thou and I Did, till we loved? Were we not weaned till then? But sucked on country pleasures, childishly? Or snorted we in the Seven Sleepers’ den? ’Twas so; but this, all pleasures fancies be. If ever any beauty I did see, Which I desired, and got, ’twas but a dream of thee. And now good-morrow to our waking souls, Which watch not one another out of fear; For love, all love of other sights controls, And makes one little room an everywhere. Let sea-discoverers to new worlds have gone, Let maps to other, worlds on worlds have shown, Let us possess one world, each hath one, and is one.My face in thine eye, thine in mine appears, And true plain hearts do in the faces rest; Where can we find two better hemispheres, Without sharp north, without declining west? Whatever dies, was not mixed equally; If our two loves be one, or, thou and I Love so alike, that none do slacken, none can die.</p

„No spring, nor summer beauty hath such grace,
As I have seen in one autumnal face.“

— John Donne, The Complete Poetry and Selected Prose
No. 9, The Autumnal, line 1

„If our two loves be one, or, thou and I
Love so alike, that none do slacken, none can die.“

— John Donne
Context: p>I wonder, by my troth, what thou and I Did, till we loved? Were we not weaned till then? But sucked on country pleasures, childishly? Or snorted we in the Seven Sleepers’ den? ’Twas so; but this, all pleasures fancies be. If ever any beauty I did see, Which I desired, and got, ’twas but a dream of thee. And now good-morrow to our waking souls, Which watch not one another out of fear; For love, all love of other sights controls, And makes one little room an everywhere. Let sea-discoverers to new worlds have gone, Let maps to other, worlds on worlds have shown, Let us possess one world, each hath one, and is one.My face in thine eye, thine in mine appears, And true plain hearts do in the faces rest; Where can we find two better hemispheres, Without sharp north, without declining west? Whatever dies, was not mixed equally; If our two loves be one, or, thou and I Love so alike, that none do slacken, none can die.</p

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„They'are ours, though they'are not we“

— John Donne
Context: We then, who are this new soul, know Of what we are compos'd and made, For th' atomies of which we grow Are souls, whom no change can invade. But oh alas, so long, so far, Our bodies why do we forbear? They'are ours, though they'are not we; we are The intelligences, they the spheres. The Extasy, line 45

„Death, be not proud, though some have called thee
Mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so,“

— John Donne
Context: Death, be not proud, though some have called thee Mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so, For those whom thou think'st thou dost overthrow, Die not, poor death, nor yet canst thou kill me. No. 10, line 1

„At the round earth's imagin'd corners, blow
Your trumpets, angels, and arise, arise“

— John Donne
Context: At the round earth's imagin'd corners, blow Your trumpets, angels, and arise, arise From death, you numberless infinities Of souls, and to your scattred bodies go. No. 7, line 1

„For love, all love of other sights controls,
And makes one little room an everywhere.“

— John Donne
Context: p>I wonder, by my troth, what thou and I Did, till we loved? Were we not weaned till then? But sucked on country pleasures, childishly? Or snorted we in the Seven Sleepers’ den? ’Twas so; but this, all pleasures fancies be. If ever any beauty I did see, Which I desired, and got, ’twas but a dream of thee. And now good-morrow to our waking souls, Which watch not one another out of fear; For love, all love of other sights controls, And makes one little room an everywhere. Let sea-discoverers to new worlds have gone, Let maps to other, worlds on worlds have shown, Let us possess one world, each hath one, and is one.My face in thine eye, thine in mine appears, And true plain hearts do in the faces rest; Where can we find two better hemispheres, Without sharp north, without declining west? Whatever dies, was not mixed equally; If our two loves be one, or, thou and I Love so alike, that none do slacken, none can die.</p

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