Frases de Horace Greeley

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Horace Greeley

Data de nascimento: 3. Fevereiro 1811
Data de falecimento: 29. Novembro 1872

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Horace Greeley foi um jornalista estadunidense e fundador do Partido Republicano.

Ele era um ferrenho crítico da escravidão e foi um dos maiores nomes do Abolicionismo nos Estados Unidos, ele foi membro Partido Whig entre 1847 até 1854, após a promulgação da Lei de Kansas-Nebraska que incentivava a expansão da escravidão para o Oeste e a entrada de novos "Estados escravocratas", ele como resposta, uniu-se junto com as antigas lideranças do Partido Whig como Abraham Lincoln, e juntos fundaram um novo partido, o Partido Republicano como uma forma de resposta à essa lei, esse partido se opunha à escravidão, e em 1860 o Partido Republicano lançou a candidatura de Abraham Lincoln que foi eleito presidente numa eleição bastante apertada e turbulenta, aquela foi uma das eleições mais turbulentas da história americana, a candidatura de Lincoln foi fortemente apoiada por Greeley, após a sua posse, Greeley constantemente incentivava Lincoln a abolir a escravidão e inclusive chegou a apresentar Frederick Douglass a Lincoln, em 1862 com o objetivo de enfraquecer os confederados Lincoln aprovou a Lei de Emancipação dos Escravos que abolia definitivamente a escravidão em todos os estados dos Estados Unidos, após esse feito Greeley ficou muito feliz e o elogiou na tribuna de seu jornal, em 1864 ele apoiou a reeleição de Lincoln, foi candidato à presidente em 1872 pela ala Liberal do Partido Republicano contra os "radicais republicanos" apoiados por Grant, ele concorreu sob uma plataforma moderada, em contraste com o "radicalismo" de Grant e seus apoiadores, ele nunca chegou a ser um Democrata, mas foi apoiado pelo partido Democrata, que viu sua candidatura como uma oportunidade de tentar voltar à Casa Branca, porém após a logo Eleição, Greeley faleceu em 29 de novembro de 1872 aos 61 anos de idade, ele morreu durante o sono em sua residência que ficava numa vila do Condado de Westchester no estado de Nova Iorque, depois da eleição presidencial o povo tinha votado, mas o Colégio eleitoral não, e os delegados que se comprometeram a votar em Greeley acabaram migrando para seu companheiro de chapa e demais políticos democratas do sul, no final, dos 66 delegados que se comprometeram a votar em Greeley, apenas 3 votaram nele, essa foi a única vez que um candidato morreu poucas semanas após as eleições nos Estados Unidos, ele teve um funeral simples e foi enterrado no Cemitério Green-Wood, também foi do Autor da famosa frase "Go West, young man, go West" .

Citações Horace Greeley

„We must have scouts, guides, spies, cooks, teamsters, diggers and choppers from the Blacks of the South, whether we allow them to fight for us or not, or we shall be baffled and repelled“

— Horace Greeley
Context: IX. I close as I began with the statement that what an immense majority of the Loyal Millions of your countrymen require of you is a frank, declared, unqualified, ungrudging execution of the laws of the land, more especially of the Confiscation Act. That Act gives freedom to the slaves of Rebels coming within our lines, or whom those lines may at any time inclose--we ask you to render it due obedience by publicly requiring all your subordinates to recognize and obey it. The rebels are everywhere using the late anti-negro riots in the North, as they have long used your officers' treatment of negroes in the South, to convince the slaves that they have nothing to hope from a Union success-that we mean in that case to sell them into a bitter bondage to defray the cost of war. Let them impress this as a truth on the great mass of their ignorant and credulous bondsmen, and the Union will never be restored-never. We cannot conquer Ten Millions of People united in solid phalanx against us, powerfully aided by the Northern sympathizers and European allies. We must have scouts, guides, spies, cooks, teamsters, diggers and choppers from the Blacks of the South, whether we allow them to fight for us or not, or we shall be baffled and repelled. As one of the millions who would gladly have avoided this struggle at any sacrifice but that Principle and Honor, but who now feel that the triumph of the Union is dispensable not only to the existence of our country to the well being of mankind, I entreat you to render a hearty and unequivocal obedience to the law of the land.

„V. We complain that the Union cause has suffered, and is now suffering immensely, from mistaken deference to Rebel Slavery. Had you, Sir, in your Inaugural Address, unmistakably given notice that, in case the Rebellion already commenced were persisted in, and your efforts to preserve the Union and enforce the laws should be resisted by armed force, you would recognize no loyal person as rightfully held in Slavery by a traitor, we believe the Rebellion would therein have received a staggering if not fatal blow. At that moment, according to the returns of the most recent elections, the Unionists were a large majority of the voters of the Slave States. But they were composed in good part of the aged, the feeble, the wealthy, the timid--the young, the reckless, the aspiring, the adventurous, had already been largely lured by the gamblers and negro-traders, the politicians by trade and the conspirators by instinct, into the toils of Treason. Had you then proclaimed that Rebellion would strike the shackles from the slaves of every traitor, the wealthy and the cautious would have been supplied with a powerful inducement to remain loyal. As it was, every coward in the South soon became a traitor from fear; for Loyalty was perilous, while Treason seemed comparatively safe. Hence the boasted unanimity of the South--a unanimity based on Rebel terrorism and the fact that immunity and safety were found on that side, danger and probable death on ours. The Rebels from the first have been eager to confiscate, imprison, scourge and kill: we have fought wolves with the devices of sheep. The result is just what might have been expected. Tens of thousands are fighting in the Rebel ranks to-day whose, original bias and natural leanings would have led them into ours.“

— Horace Greeley

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„III. We think you are unduly influenced by the counsels, the representations, the menaces, of certain fossil politicians hailing from the Border Slave States. Knowing well that the heartily, unconditionally loyal portion of the White citizens of those States do not expect nor desire chat Slavery shall be upheld to the prejudice of the Union--(for the truth of which we appeal not only to every Republican residing in those States, but to such eminent loyalists as H. Winter Davis, Parson Brownlow, the Union Central Committee of Baltimore, and to The Nashville Union)--we ask you to consider that Slavery is everywhere the inciting cause and sustaining base of treason: the most slaveholding sections of Maryland and Delaware being this day, though under the Union flag, in full sympathy with the Rebellion, while the Free-Labor portions of Tennessee and of Texas, though writhing under the bloody heel of Treason, are unconquerably loyal to the Union. So emphatically is this the case, that a most intelligent Union banker of Baltimore recently avowed his confident belief that a majority of the present Legislature of Maryland, though elected as and still professing to be Unionists, are at heart desirous of the triumph of the Jeff. Davis conspiracy; and when asked how they could be won back to loyalty, replied "only by the complete Abolition of Slavery." It seems to us the most obvious truth, that whatever strengthens or fortifies Slavery in the Border States strengthens also Treason, and drives home the wedge intended to divide the Union. Had you from the first refused to recognize in those States, as here, any other than unconditional loyalty--that which stands for the Union, whatever may become of Slavery, those States would have been, and would be, far more helpful and less troublesome to the defenders of the Union than they have been, or now are.“

— Horace Greeley

„If any young man is about to commence the world, we say to him, publicly and privately, Go to the West.“

— Horace Greeley
As quoted in New Yorker (25 August 1838); often paraphrased as "Go west, young man, and grow up with the country", sometimes misattributed to John L. Soule [https://books.google.com/books?id=UaTQAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA361&lpg=PA361&dq=+Go+to+the+West.&source=bl&ots=3ys4effVfR&sig=Jq3JDde6ZjCDefVWimZOReHOTlE&hl=en&sa=X&ei=_xPaVNOLJIS7ggS47YPQCw&ved=0CCAQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=%22%20publicly%20and%20privately%2C%20Go%20to%20the%20West.&f=false]

„There aren't half enough of them going there as it is.“

— Horace Greeley
Reply to a missionary who asked Greeley for a subscription to "help keep people from going to hell", as quoted in "Grab-bag Education", The Book of Journeyman (1930) by Albert Jay Nock

„VII. Let me call your attention to the recent tragedy in New Orleans, whereof the facts are obtained entirely through Pro-Slavery channels. A considerable body of resolute, able-bodied men, held in Slavery by two Rebel sugar-planters in defiance of the Confiscation Act which you have approved, left plantations thirty miles distant and made their way to the great mart of the South-West, which they knew to be the indisputed possession of the Union forces. They made their way safely and quietly through thirty miles of Rebel territory, expecting to find freedom under the protection of our flag. Whether they had or had not heard of the passage of the Confiscation Act, they reasoned logically that we could not kill them for deserting the service of their lifelong oppressors, who had through treason become our implacable enemies. They came to us for liberty and protection, for which they were willing render their best service: they met with hostility, captivity, and murder. The barking of the base curs of Slavery in this quarter deceives no one--not even themselves. They say, indeed, that the negroes had no right to appear in New Orleans armed (with their implements of daily labor in the cane-field); but no one doubts that they would gladly have laid these down if assured that they should be free. They were set upon and maimed, captured and killed, because they sought the benefit of that act of Congress which they may not specifically have heard of, but which was none the less the law of the land which they had a clear right to the benefit of--which it was somebody's duty to publish far and wide, in order that so many as possible should be impelled to desist from serving Rebels and the Rebellion and come over to the side of the Union, They sought their liberty in strict accordance with the law of the land--they were butchered or re-enslaved for so doing by the help of Union soldiers enlisted to fight against slaveholding Treason. It was somebody's fault that they were so murdered--if others shall hereafter stuffer in like manner, in default of explicit and public directions to your generals that they are to recognize and obey the Confiscation Act, the world will lay the blame on you. Whether you will choose to hear it through future History and 'at the bar of God, I will not judge. I can only hope.“

— Horace Greeley

„The illusion that times that were are better than those that are, has probably pervaded all ages.“

— Horace Greeley
As quoted in The American Conflict, A History of the Great Rebellion (1864).

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„My leading idea was the establishment of a journal removed alike from servile partisanship on the one hand and from gagged, mincing neutrality on the other.“

— Horace Greeley
On the founding of the New-York Tribune, in [http://books.google.com/books?id=wQgxAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA137 Recollections of a Busy Life] (1868), p. 137.

„VI. We complain that the Confiscation Act which you approved is habitually disregarded by your Generals, and that no word of rebuke for them from you has yet reached the public ear. Fremont's Proclamation and Hunter's Order favoring Emancipation were promptly annulled by you; while Halleck's No. 3, forbidding fugitives from Slavery to Rebels to come within his lines-- an order as unmilitary as inhuman, and which received the hearty approbation of every traitor in America-- with scores of like tendency, have never provoked even your own remonstrance. We complain that the officers of your Armies have habitually repelled rather than invited approach of slaves who would have gladly taken the risks of escaping from their Rebel masters to our camps, bringing intelligence often of inestimable value to the Union cause. We complain that those who have thus escaped to us, avowing a willingness to do for us whatever might be required, have been brutally and madly repulsed, and often surrendered to be scourged, maimed and tortured by the ruffian traitors, who pretend to own them. We complain that a large proportion of our regular Army Officers, with many of the Volunteers, evince far more solicitude to uphold Slavery than to put down the Rebellion. And finally, we complain that you, Mr. President, elected as a Republican, knowing well what an abomination Slavery is, and how emphatically it is the core and essence of this atrocious Rebellion, seem never to interfere with these atrocities, and never give a direction to your Military subordinates, which does not appear to have been conceived in the interest of Slavery rather than of Freedom.“

— Horace Greeley

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