Frases de Northrop Frye

Northrop Frye photo
4   0

Northrop Frye

Data de nascimento: 14. Julho 1912
Data de falecimento: 23. Janeiro 1991
Outros nomes: ਨੋਰਥਰੋਪ ਫ੍ਰਾਈ, Нортроп Фрај, Нортроп Фрай

Herman Northrop Frye foi um crítico literário canadense, um dos mais célebres do século XX.

Nascido em Sherbrooke, Quebec, mas criado em Moncton, New Brunswick, ele passou toda sua carreira, incluindo seus dias de aluno da graduação, na Faculdade Victoria, Universidade de Toronto. Ele chegou à proeminência internacional quando ainda era estudante. A poesia profética de William Blake há muito era considerada divagações delirantes que nunca poderiam ser entendidas. Frye encontrou nela um sistema de metáfora derivado do Paraíso Perdido e da Bíblia. Ele publicou suas descobertas como Fearful Symmetry em 1947.

Dez anos mais tarde ele expandiu sua visão, defendendo em Anatomia da crítica que há certos arquétipos e símbolos usados por toda a literatura. Seu O código dos códigos examinou como as cenas e imagens da Bíblia são a base de toda a literatura ocidental. Dentro desse contexto, ele analisou a novela Dão-Lalalão de João Guimarães Rosa, na qual percebeu influências bíblicas do livro Cantares de Salomão .

Ele também se ocupou de crítica cultural e social e recebeu 39 títulos honorários. Anatomia da crítica permanece um dos mais importantes trabalhos da crítica literária do século XX.

Frye foi premiado com Medalha Lorne Pierce Medal da Royal Society of Canada em 1958. Em 1972 ele recebeu a Comenda da Ordem do Canadá.

Northrop Frye morreu em 1991 e foi enterrado no Mount Pleasant Cemetery em Toronto, Ontário.

Em 2000, ele foi honrado pelo governo do Canadá com sua imagem num selo postal. Um festival devotado aos trabalhos de Northrop Frye é realizado anualmente em Moncton, New Brunswick no mês de abril.

Citações Northrop Frye

„At the level of ordinary consciousness the individual man is the centre of everything, surrounded on all sides by what he isn't.“

—  Northrop Frye

"Quotes", The Educated Imagination (1963), Talk 1: The Motive For Metaphor http://northropfrye-theeducatedimagination.blogspot.ca/2009/08/1-motive-for-metaphor.html
Contexto: At the level of ordinary consciousness the individual man is the centre of everything, surrounded on all sides by what he isn't. At the level of practical sense, or civilization, there's a human circumference, a little cultivated world with a human shape, fenced off from the jungle and inside the sea and the sky. But in the imagination anything goes that can be imagined, and the limit of the imagination is a totally human world.

„For all its wonderful machinery, we know it's really a crazy ramshackle building, and at ay time may crash around our ears.“

—  Northrop Frye

"Quotes", The Educated Imagination (1963), Talk 6: The Vocation of Eloquence
Contexto: The particular myth that's been organizing this talk, and in a way the whole series, is the story of the Tower of Babel in the Bible. The civilization we live in at present is a gigantic technological structure, a skyscraper almost high enough to reach the moon. It looks like a single world-wide effort, but it's really a deadlock of rivalries; it looks very impressive, except that it has no genuine human dignity. For all its wonderful machinery, we know it's really a crazy ramshackle building, and at ay time may crash around our ears. What the myth tells us is that the Tower of Babel is a work of human imagination, that tis main elements are words, and that what will make it collapse is a confusion of tongues. All had originally one language, the myth says. That language is not English or Russian or Chinese or any common ancestor, if there was one. It is the language of human nature, the language that makes both Shakespeare and Pushkin authentic poets, that gives a social vision to both Lincoln and Gandhi. It never speaks unless we take the time to listen in leisure, and it speaks only in a voice too quite for panic to hear. And then all it has to tell us, when we look over the edge of our leaning tower, is that we are not getting any nearer [to] heaven, and that it is time to return to the earth.

„But in the imagination anything goes that can be imagined, and the limit of the imagination is a totally human world.“

—  Northrop Frye

"Quotes", The Educated Imagination (1963), Talk 1: The Motive For Metaphor http://northropfrye-theeducatedimagination.blogspot.ca/2009/08/1-motive-for-metaphor.html
Contexto: At the level of ordinary consciousness the individual man is the centre of everything, surrounded on all sides by what he isn't. At the level of practical sense, or civilization, there's a human circumference, a little cultivated world with a human shape, fenced off from the jungle and inside the sea and the sky. But in the imagination anything goes that can be imagined, and the limit of the imagination is a totally human world.

„We have to look at the figures of speech a writer uses, his images and symbols, to realize that underneath all the complexity of human life that uneasy stare at an alien nature is still haunting us, and the problem of surmounting it is still with us.“

—  Northrop Frye

"Quotes", The Educated Imagination (1963), Talk 2: The Singing School
Contexto: [L]iterature not only leads us toward the regaining of identity, but it also separates this state from its opposite, the world we don't like and want to get away from... We have to look at the figures of speech a writer uses, his images and symbols, to realize that underneath all the complexity of human life that uneasy stare at an alien nature is still haunting us, and the problem of surmounting it is still with us.... Literature is still doing the same job that mythology did earlier, but filling in its huge cloudy shapes with sharper lights and deeper shadows.

„In literature you don't just read one poem or novel after another, but enter into a complete world of which every work of literature forms part.“

—  Northrop Frye

"Quotes", The Educated Imagination (1963), Talk 3: Giants in Time
Contexto: In literature you don't just read one poem or novel after another, but enter into a complete world of which every work of literature forms part. This affects the writer as much as it does the reader.

„The wise man looks for the invisible line between the "is" and the "is not" which is the way through“

—  Northrop Frye

"Quotes", Late Notebooks, 1982–1990: Architecture of the Spiritual World (2002)
Contexto: Man is born lost in a forest. If he is obsessed by the thereness of the forest, he stays lost and goes in circles; if he assumes the forest is not there, he keeps bumping into trees. The wise man looks for the invisible line between the "is" and the "is not" which is the way through. The street in the city, the highway in the desert, the pathway of the planets through the labyrinth of the stars, are parallel forms. (1:111)

Help us translate English quotes

Discover interesting quotes and translate them.

Start translating

„We are now dealing with the imaginative, not the existential, with the "let this be," not with "this is," and no work of literature is better by virtue of what it says than any other work“

—  Northrop Frye, livro The Well-Tempered Critic

The Well-Tempered Critic, p. 140
"Quotes"
Contexto: The fundamental act of criticism is a disinterested response to a work of literature in which all one's beliefs, engagements, commitments, prejudices, stampedings of pity and terror, are ordered to be quiet. We are now dealing with the imaginative, not the existential, with the "let this be," not with "this is," and no work of literature is better by virtue of what it says than any other work.

„The use of cliché [is] the use of ready-made, prefabricated formulas designed to give those who are too lazy think the illusion of thinking“

—  Northrop Frye

"Quotes", The Educated Imagination (1963), Talk 6: The Vocation of Eloquence
Contexto: The use of cliché [is] the use of ready-made, prefabricated formulas designed to give those who are too lazy think the illusion of thinking... If our aim is only to say what gets by in society, our reactions will become almost completely mechanical. That's the direction cliché takes us in... it's no more a product of a conscious mind than the bark of a dog.

„The civilization we live in at present is a gigantic technological structure“

—  Northrop Frye

"Quotes", The Educated Imagination (1963), Talk 6: The Vocation of Eloquence
Contexto: The particular myth that's been organizing this talk, and in a way the whole series, is the story of the Tower of Babel in the Bible. The civilization we live in at present is a gigantic technological structure, a skyscraper almost high enough to reach the moon. It looks like a single world-wide effort, but it's really a deadlock of rivalries; it looks very impressive, except that it has no genuine human dignity. For all its wonderful machinery, we know it's really a crazy ramshackle building, and at ay time may crash around our ears. What the myth tells us is that the Tower of Babel is a work of human imagination, that tis main elements are words, and that what will make it collapse is a confusion of tongues. All had originally one language, the myth says. That language is not English or Russian or Chinese or any common ancestor, if there was one. It is the language of human nature, the language that makes both Shakespeare and Pushkin authentic poets, that gives a social vision to both Lincoln and Gandhi. It never speaks unless we take the time to listen in leisure, and it speaks only in a voice too quite for panic to hear. And then all it has to tell us, when we look over the edge of our leaning tower, is that we are not getting any nearer [to] heaven, and that it is time to return to the earth.

„The objective world is only “material”: it’s there, but it could be there in a great many different forms and aspects…Even here there [are] still possibilities“

—  Northrop Frye

"Quotes"
Contexto: The objective world is only “material”: it’s there, but it could be there in a great many different forms and aspects... Even here there [are] still possibilities: it can’t be just anything. But perhaps extracting a finite schema from the variety of mythologies, literatures, or religions might contribute something to the understanding of what some of these possibilities could be. The individual can’t create his own world, except in art or fantasy: society can only create a myth of concern. What fun if one could get just a peep at what some of the other worlds are that a new humanity could create–no, live in. (p. 287-8)

„A public that tries to do without criticism, and asserts that it knows what it wants or likes, brutalizes the arts and loses its cultural memory.“

—  Northrop Frye

"Quotes", Anatomy of Criticism: Four Essays (1957), Polemical Introduction
Contexto: A public that tries to do without criticism, and asserts that it knows what it wants or likes, brutalizes the arts and loses its cultural memory. Art for art's sake is a retreat from criticism which ends in an impoverishment of civilized life itself.

„Finnegans Wake is not a book to read, but a book to decipher:“

—  Northrop Frye

"Quotes", The Educated Imagination (1963), Talk 4: The Keys To Dreamland
Contexto: Finnegans Wake is not a book to read, but a book to decipher: as Joyce says, it's about a dreamer, but it's addressed to an ideal reader suffering from ideal insomnia.

„I had genius. No one else in the field known to me had quite that.“

—  Northrop Frye

"Statement for the Day of My Death"
"Quotes"
Contexto: The twentieth century saw an amazing development of scholarship and criticism in the humanities, carried out by people who were more intelligent, better trained, had more languages, had a better sense of proportion, and were infinitely more accurate scholars and competent professional men than I. I had genius. No one else in the field known to me had quite that.

„The poet…is an identifier: everything he sees in nature he identifies with human life.“

—  Northrop Frye

"Quotes", The Educated Imagination (1963), Talk 3: Giants in Time
Contexto: The poet... is an identifier: everything he sees in nature he identifies with human life.

„Education is something that affects the whole person, not bits and pieces of him.“

—  Northrop Frye

"Quotes", The Educated Imagination (1963), Talk 6: The Vocation of Eloquence
Contexto: Education is something that affects the whole person, not bits and pieces of him. It doesn't just train the mind: it's a social and moral development too.

Autores parecidos

Thomas Stearns Eliot photo
Thomas Stearns Eliot31
poeta, dramaturgo e crítico literário estadunidense
James Joyce photo
James Joyce46
escritor irlandês do século XX, mais conhecido por escrever…
Paulo Coelho photo
Paulo Coelho389
escritor e letrista brasileiro
Michel Foucault photo
Michel Foucault27
Filósofo francês
Jean Paul Sartre photo
Jean Paul Sartre105
Filósofo existencialista, escritor, dramaturgo, roteirista,…
Clive Staples Lewis photo
Clive Staples Lewis93
Apologeta e novelista cristão
Aniversários de hoje
Oswald de Andrade photo
Oswald de Andrade24
1890 - 1954
Maud Mannoni photo
Maud Mannoni1
1923 - 1998
Eugene H. Peterson photo
Eugene H. Peterson1
1932 - 2018
Outros 45 aniversários hoje
Autores parecidos
Thomas Stearns Eliot photo
Thomas Stearns Eliot31
poeta, dramaturgo e crítico literário estadunidense
James Joyce photo
James Joyce46
escritor irlandês do século XX, mais conhecido por escrever…