Frases de Michael Faraday

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Michael Faraday

Data de nascimento: 22. Setembro 1791
Data de falecimento: 25. Agosto 1867

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Michael Faraday foi um físico e químico inglês. É considerado um dos cientistas mais influentes de todos os tempos. As suas contribuições mais importantes e os seus trabalhos mais conhecidos tratam dos fenômenos da eletricidade, da eletroquímica e do magnetismo. Mas Faraday fez também diversas outras contribuições muito importantes na física e na química.

Faraday foi principalmente um experimentalista, tendo sido descrito como o "melhor experimentalista na história da ciência", mesmo não conhecendo matemática avançada, como cálculo infinitesimal. Suas grandes contribuições para a ciência tiveram grande impacto sobre o entendimento do mundo natural. As descobertas de Faraday cobrem áreas significativas das modernas física e química, e a tecnologia desenvolvida baseada no seu trabalho está ainda mais presente . Suas descobertas em eletromagnetismo forneceram a base para os trabalhos de engenharia no fim do século XIX para que Edison, Siemens, Tesla e Westinghouse tornassem possível a eletrificação das sociedades industrializadas. Seus trabalhos em eletroquímica são amplamente usados em química industrial.

Na física, foi um dos primeiros a estudar as relações entre eletricidade e magnetismo. Em 1821, logo após Oersted descobrir que a eletricidade e o magnetismo eram associados entre si, Faraday publicou um trabalho que chamou de "rotação eletromagnética", elaborando os princípios de funcionamento do motor elétrico. Em 1831, Faraday descobriu a indução eletromagnética, o princípio por trás do gerador elétrico e do transformador elétrico. Suas ideias sobre os campos elétricos e os magnéticos, e a natureza dos campos em geral, inspiraram trabalhos posteriores fundamentais nessa área, como as equações de Maxwell. Seus estudos sobre campos eletromagnéticos são conceitos-chave da física atual.

Na química também teve grande importância. Descobriu o benzeno, produziu os primeiros cloretos de carbono conhecidos e ajudou a expandir os fundamentos da metalurgia e da metalografia. As suas experiências garantiram o sucesso na liquefação de gases nunca antes liquefeitos . Isso tornou possível novos métodos de refrigeração cujos princípios continuam a ser utilizados nos modernos refrigeradores domésticos.

Talvez a sua maior contribuição tenha sido virtualmente fundar a eletroquímica. Faraday criou termos como eletrólito, ânodo, catodo, eletrodo, e íon.

Em 1853 Faraday publicou os resultados dos seus estudos sobre as mesas girantes. Ele verificou experimentalmente que as mesas se moviam devido ao efeito ideomotor.

Citações Michael Faraday

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„Nothing is too wonderful to be true, if it be consistent with the laws of nature“

— Michael Faraday
Context: ALL THIS IS A DREAM. Still examine it by a few experiments. Nothing is too wonderful to be true, if it be consistent with the laws of nature; and in such things as these, experiment is the best test of such consistency. Laboratory journal entry #10,040 (19 March 1849); published in The Life and Letters of Faraday (1870) Vol. II, edited by Henry Bence Jones [https://archive.org/stream/lifelettersoffar02joneiala#page/248/mode/2up/search/wonderful], p. 248. This has sometimes been quoted partially as "Nothing is too wonderful to be true," and can be seen engraved above the doorway of the south entrance to the Humanities Building at UCLA in Los Angeles, California.[http://lit250v.library.ucla.edu/islandora/object/edu.ucla.library.universityArchives.historicPhotographs%3A67]

„Speculations? I have none. I am resting on certainties.“

— Michael Faraday
Context: Speculations? I have none. I am resting on certainties. I know whom I have believed and am persuaded that he is able to keep that which I have committed unto him against that day. When asked about his speculations on life beyond death, as quoted in The Homiletic Review‎ (April 1896), p. 442

„I am, I hope, very thankful that in the withdrawal of the powers and things of life, the good hope is left with me, which makes the contemplation of death a comfort — not a fear.“

— Michael Faraday
Context: I am, I hope, very thankful that in the withdrawal of the powers and things of life, the good hope is left with me, which makes the contemplation of death a comfort — not a fear. Such peace is alone the gift of God, and as it is He who gives it, why should we be afraid? His unspeakable gift in His beloved Son is the ground of no doubtful hope, and there is the rest for those who )like you and me) are drawing near the latter end of our terms here below. I do not know, however why I should join you with me in years. I forget your age, but this I know (and feel as well) that next Sabbath day (the 22nd) I shall complete my 70th year. I can hardly think myself so old as I write to you — so much of cheerful spirit, ease and general health is left to me, and if my memory fails, why it causes that I forget troubles as well as pleasure and the end is, I am happy and content. Letter to Auguste de la Rive (1861), as quoted in The Philosopher's Tree : A Selection of Michael Faraday's Writings (1999) edited by Peter Day, p. 199

„It teaches us first by tutors and books, to learn that which is already known to others, and then by the light and methods which belong to science to learn for ourselves and for others; so making a fruitful return to man in the future for that which we have obtained from the men of the past.“

— Michael Faraday
Context: We learn by such results as these, what is the kind of education that science offers to man. It teaches us to be neglectful of nothing, not to despise the small beginnings — they precede of necessity all great things. Vesicles make clouds; they are trifles light as air, but then they make drops, and drops make showers, rain makes torrents and rivers, and these can alter the face of a country, and even keep the ocean to its proper fulness and use. It teaches a continual comparison of the small and great, and that under differences almost approaching the infinite, for the small as often contains the great in principle, as the great does the small; and thus the mind becomes comprehensive. It teaches to deduce principles carefully, to hold them firmly, or to suspend the judgment, to discover and obey law, and by it to be bold in applying to the greatest what we know of the smallest. It teaches us first by tutors and books, to learn that which is already known to others, and then by the light and methods which belong to science to learn for ourselves and for others; so making a fruitful return to man in the future for that which we have obtained from the men of the past. Lecture notes of 1858, quoted in The Life and Letters of Faraday (1870) by Bence Jones, Vol. 2, p. 403

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„I have far more confidence in the one man who works mentally and bodily at a matter than in the six who merely talk about it“

— Michael Faraday
Context: I have far more confidence in the one man who works mentally and bodily at a matter than in the six who merely talk about it — and I therefore hope and am fully persuaded that you are working. Nature is our kindest friend and best critic in experimental science if we only allow her intimations to fall unbiased on our minds. Nothing is so good as an experiment which, whilst it sets an error right, gives us (as a reward for our humility in being reproved) an absolute advancement in knowledge. Letter to John Tyndall (19 April 1851); letter 2411, edited by

„Among those points of self-education which take up the form of mental discipline, there is one of great importance, and, moreover, difficult to deal with, because it involves an internal conflict, and equally touches our vanity and our ease. It consists in the tendency to deceive ourselves regarding all we wish for, and the necessity of resistance to these desires.“

— Michael Faraday
Context: Among those points of self-education which take up the form of mental discipline, there is one of great importance, and, moreover, difficult to deal with, because it involves an internal conflict, and equally touches our vanity and our ease. It consists in the tendency to deceive ourselves regarding all we wish for, and the necessity of resistance to these desires. It is impossible for any one who has not been constrained, by the course of his occupation and thoughts, to a habit of continual self-correction, to be aware of the amount of error in relation to judgment arising from this tendency. The force of the temptation which urges us to seek for such evidence and appearances as are in favour of our desires, and to disregard those which oppose them, is wonderfully great. In this respect we are all, more or less, active promoters of error. In place of practising wholesome self-abnegation, we ever make the wish the father to the thought: we receive as friendly that which agrees with, we resist with dislike that which opposes us; whereas the very reverse is required by every dictate of common sense. Royal Institution Lecture On Mental Education (6 May 1854), as reprinted in Experimental Researches in Chemistry and Physics, by Michael Faraday, 1859, pp 474-475, emphasis verbatim.

„Bacon in his instruction tells us that the scientific student ought not to be as the ant, who gathers merely, nor as the spider who spins from her own bowels, but rather as the bee who both gathers and produces.“

— Michael Faraday
Context: Bacon in his instruction tells us that the scientific student ought not to be as the ant, who gathers merely, nor as the spider who spins from her own bowels, but rather as the bee who both gathers and produces. All this is true of the teaching afforded by any part of physical science. Electricity is often called wonderful, beautiful; but it is so only in common with the other forces of nature. The beauty of electricity or of any other force is not that the power is mysterious, and unexpected, touching every sense at unawares in turn, but that it is under law, and that the taught intellect can even now govern it largely. The human mind is placed above, and not beneath it, and it is in such a point of view that the mental education afforded by science is rendered super-eminent in dignity, in practical application and utility; for by enabling the mind to apply the natural power through law, it conveys the gifts of God to man. Lecture notes of 1858, quoted in The Life and Letters of Faraday (1870) by Bence Jones, Vol. 2, p. 404

„Nature is our kindest friend and best critic in experimental science if we only allow her intimations to fall unbiased on our minds.“

— Michael Faraday
Context: I have far more confidence in the one man who works mentally and bodily at a matter than in the six who merely talk about it — and I therefore hope and am fully persuaded that you are working. Nature is our kindest friend and best critic in experimental science if we only allow her intimations to fall unbiased on our minds. Nothing is so good as an experiment which, whilst it sets an error right, gives us (as a reward for our humility in being reproved) an absolute advancement in knowledge. Letter to John Tyndall (19 April 1851); letter 2411, edited by

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