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Thomas Pynchon

Data de nascimento: 8. Maio 1937

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Thomas Ruggles Pynchon, Jr. é um escritor americano, conhecido principalmente por seus livros longos e complexos - às vezes com centenas de personagens e dezenas de histórias paralelas -, Thomas é um dos principais expoentes do romance pós-moderno, juntamente com William Gaddis, John Barth, Donald Barthelme, Don Delillo e Paul Auster.

Ganhador do National Book Awards, seu nome é constantemente citado como concorrente ao Nobel de Literatura. Em 1988, foi premiado pela Fundação MacArthur. O crítico literário Harold Bloom nomeou Pynchon um dos quatro romancistas anglófonos "canonizáveis" de seu tempo - ao lado de Don DeLillo, Philip Roth e Cormac McCarthy.

Sua ficção abrange diversos campos, como física, matemática, química, filosofia, parapsicologia, história, mitologia, ocultismo, música pop, quadrinhos, cinema, drogas e psicologia, unindo-os de maneira picaresca, humorística, absurda, poética e sombria. A preocupação central da obra de Pynchon é explorar a acumulação e a inter-relação entre estes diferentes conhecimentos, que resultariam em uma realidade entrópica tangível apenas pela paranóia. Ele também é conhecido pela reclusão em que vive, o que gerou diversos rumores sobre sua real identidade.[1] Nunca concedeu entrevistas e as únicas fotos conhecidas dele datam de sua juventude.

Citações Thomas Pynchon

„Uma geração atrás, o número cada vez menor de nascimentos de crianças vivas entre os herero era um assunto de grande interesse para os médicos de toda a África meridional. Os brancos preocupavam-se, de tal modo como se o gado estivesse atacado de peste bovina. Uma coisa desagradável, ver a população subjugada diminuindo daquele jeito anos após ano. O que é uma colônia sem seus nativos de pele escura? Que graça tem, se todos eles vão morrer? Apenas uma ampla extensão de deserto, sem criadas, sem trabalhadores rurais, sem operários para a construção civil e as minas - peraí, um minuto, é ele sim, Karl Marx, aquele velho racista manhoso, escapulindo de fininho, com os dentes trincados, sobrancelhas arqueadas, tentando fazer de conta que é só uma questão de Mão-de-Obra Barata e Mercados Internacionais... Ah, não. Uma colônia é muito mais que isso. A colônia é a latrina da alma européia, onde o sujeito pode baixar as calças e relaxar, gozando o cheiro de sua própria merda. Onde ele pode agarrar sua presa esguia rugindo com todas as forças sempre que lhe der na veneta, e beber-lhe o sangue com prazer incontido. Não é? Onde ele pode chafurdar, em pleno cio, e entregar-se a uma maciez, uma escuridão receptiva de braços e pernas, cabelos tão encarapinhados quanto os pêlos de sua própria genitália proibida. Onde a papoula, o cânhamo e a coca crescem luxuriantes, verdejantes, e não com a cores e o estilo da morte, como a cravagem e o agárico, as pragas e os fungos nativos da Europa. A Europa cristã sempre foi morte, Karl, morte e repressão. Lá fora, nas colônias, pode-se viver a vida, dedicar-se à vida e à sensualidade em todas as suas formas, sem prejudicar em nada a Metrópole, nada que suje aquelas catedrais, estátuas de mármore branco, pensamentos nobres... As notícias nunca chegam lá. Os silêncios aqui são tão amplos que absorvem todos os comportamentos, por mais sujos e animalescos que sejam...“

— Thomas Pynchon
Gravity's Rainbow

Publicidade

„When Marilyn Monroe got out of the game, I wrote something like, "Southern California's special horror notwithstanding, if the world offered nothing, nowhere to support or make bearable whatever her private grief was, then it is that world, and not she, that is at fault."“

— Thomas Pynchon
Context: When Marilyn Monroe got out of the game, I wrote something like, "Southern California's special horror notwithstanding, if the world offered nothing, nowhere to support or make bearable whatever her private grief was, then it is that world, and not she, that is at fault." I wrote that in the first few shook-up minutes after hearing the bulletin sandwiched in between Don and Phil Everly and surrounded by all manner of whoops and whistles coming out of an audio signal generator, like you are apt to hear on the provincial radio these days. But I don't think I'd take those words back. The world is at fault, not because it is inherently good or bad or anything but what it is, but because it doesn't prepare us in anything but body to get along with. Our souls it leaves to whatever obsolescences, bigotries, theories of education workable and un, parental wisdom or lack of it, happen to get in its more or less Brownian (your phrase) pilgrimage between the cord-cutting ceremony and the time they slide you down the chute into the oven, while the guy on the Wurlitzer plays Aba Daba Honeymoon because you had once told somebody it was the nadir of all American expression; only they didn't know what nadir meant but it must be good because of the vehemence with which you expressed yourself. Letter to Jules Siegel, published in Cavalier magazine (August 1965); republished in "Pynchon notes 15" and "[http://against-the-day.pynchonwiki.com/wiki/index.php?title=The_World_is_at_Fault "The World is at Fault"] at [http://pynchonwiki.com/ pynchonwiki.com]

„The only consolation he drew from the present chaos was that his theory managed to explain it.“

— Thomas Pynchon
Context: He had decided long ago that no Situation had any objective reality: it only existed in the minds of those who happened to be in on it at any specific moment. Since these several minds tended to form a sum total or complex more mongrel than homogeneous, The Situation must necessarily appear to a single observer much like a diagram in four dimensions to an eye conditioned to seeing the world in only three. Hence the success or failure of any diplomatic issue must vary directly with the degree of rapport achieved by the team confronting it. This had led to the near obsession with teamwork which had inspired his colleagues to dub him Soft-show Sydney, on the assumption that he was at his best working in front of a chorus line. But it was a neat theory, and he was in love with it. The only consolation he drew from the present chaos was that his theory managed to explain it. Chapter Seven, Part VII

„It is usually not wise to discuss matters of costume with people like this, — politics or religion being far safer topicks.“

— Thomas Pynchon
Context: It is usually not wise to discuss matters of costume with people like this, — politics or religion being far safer topicks. <!-- [sic] Chapter 74

Publicidade

„I want you to hold this for me, till I ask for it back. It looks like Italo is going to get here before Tamara, and I'm not sure which one“

— Thomas Pynchon
Context: "You." A finger the size of a corncob, an inch from Slothrop's nose. ... "Look," Slothrop's friend producing a kraft-paper envelope that even in the gloom Slothrop can tell is fat with American Army yellow-seal scrip, "I want you to hold this for me, till I ask for it back. It looks like Italo is going to get here before Tamara, and I'm not sure which one" "At this rate, Tamara's gonna get here before tonight," Slothrop interjects in a Groucho Marx voice. "Don't try to undermine my confidence in you," advises the Large One. "You're the man."

„If he’d been the type who evolves theories of history for his own amusement, he might have said all political events: wars, governments and uprisings, have the desire to get laid as their roots; because history unfolds according to economic forces and the only reason anybody wants to get rich is so he can get laid steadily, with whoever he chooses.“

— Thomas Pynchon
Context: The eyes of New York women do not see the wandering bums or the boys with no place to go. Material wealth and getting laid strolled arm-in-arm the midway of Profane’s mind. If he’d been the type who evolves theories of history for his own amusement, he might have said all political events: wars, governments and uprisings, have the desire to get laid as their roots; because history unfolds according to economic forces and the only reason anybody wants to get rich is so he can get laid steadily, with whoever he chooses. All he believed at this point, on the bench behind the library was, that any body who worked for inanimate money so he could by more inanimate objects was out of his head. Inanimate money was to get animate warmth, dead fingernails in the living shoulderblades, quick cries against the pillow, tangled hair, lidded eyes, listing loins. Chapter Eight

„The pattern would have been familiar—bohemian, creative, arty—except that it was even further removed from reality, Romanticism in its furthest decadence; being only an exhausted impersonation of poverty, rebellion and artistic “soul.” For it was the unhappy fact that most of them worked for a living and obtained the substance of their conversation from the pages of Time magazine and like publications“

— Thomas Pynchon
Context: The rest of the Crew partook of the same lethargy. Raoul wrote for television, keeping carefully in mind, and complaining bitterly about, all the sponsor-fetishes of that industry. Slab painted in sporadic bursts, referring to himself as a Catatonic Expressionist and his work as “the ultimate in non-communication.” Melvin played the guitar and sang liberal folk songs. The pattern would have been familiar—bohemian, creative, arty—except that it was even further removed from reality, Romanticism in its furthest decadence; being only an exhausted impersonation of poverty, rebellion and artistic “soul.” For it was the unhappy fact that most of them worked for a living and obtained the substance of their conversation from the pages of Time magazine and like publications Chapter Two, Part II

„The world is at fault, not because it is inherently good or bad or anything but what it is, but because it doesn't prepare us in anything but body to get along with.“

— Thomas Pynchon
Context: When Marilyn Monroe got out of the game, I wrote something like, "Southern California's special horror notwithstanding, if the world offered nothing, nowhere to support or make bearable whatever her private grief was, then it is that world, and not she, that is at fault." I wrote that in the first few shook-up minutes after hearing the bulletin sandwiched in between Don and Phil Everly and surrounded by all manner of whoops and whistles coming out of an audio signal generator, like you are apt to hear on the provincial radio these days. But I don't think I'd take those words back. The world is at fault, not because it is inherently good or bad or anything but what it is, but because it doesn't prepare us in anything but body to get along with. Our souls it leaves to whatever obsolescences, bigotries, theories of education workable and un, parental wisdom or lack of it, happen to get in its more or less Brownian (your phrase) pilgrimage between the cord-cutting ceremony and the time they slide you down the chute into the oven, while the guy on the Wurlitzer plays Aba Daba Honeymoon because you had once told somebody it was the nadir of all American expression; only they didn't know what nadir meant but it must be good because of the vehemence with which you expressed yourself. Letter to Jules Siegel, published in Cavalier magazine (August 1965); republished in "Pynchon notes 15" and "[http://against-the-day.pynchonwiki.com/wiki/index.php?title=The_World_is_at_Fault "The World is at Fault"] at [http://pynchonwiki.com/ pynchonwiki.com]

Publicidade

„Now, nothing in the Sky looks the same.“

— Thomas Pynchon
Context: Now, nothing in the Sky looks the same. "As to the Comet, — I cannot account for how, — but there came this night, to this boggy Miasmatick place, an exceptional Clarity of the Air, … a sort of optickal Tension among the Stars, that seem'd ever just about to break radiantly thro'… And there. In Leo, bright-man'd, lo, it came. It came ahead. And 'twould be but Prelude to the Finger of Corsica, — which now appear'd, pointing down from Heaven. And the place where it pointed was the place I knew I must journey to, for beneath the Sky-borne Index lay, as once beneath a Star, an Infant that must, again, re-make the World, — this time 'twas a Sign from Earth, not only from Heaven, showing the way. Chapter 74

„Kekulé dreams the Great Serpent holding its own tail in its mouth, the dreaming Serpent which surrounds the World. But the meanness, the cynicism with which this dream is to be used. The Serpent that announces, "The World is a closed thing, cyclical, resonant, eternally-returning," is to be delivered into a system whose only aim is to violate the Cycle. Taking and not giving back, demanding that "productivity" and "earnings" keep on increasing with time, the System removing from the rest of the World these vast quantities of energy to keep its own tiny desperate fraction showing a profit: and not only most of humanity — most of the World, animal, vegetable, and mineral, is laid waste in the process.“

— Thomas Pynchon
Context: Kekulé dreams the Great Serpent holding its own tail in its mouth, the dreaming Serpent which surrounds the World. But the meanness, the cynicism with which this dream is to be used. The Serpent that announces, "The World is a closed thing, cyclical, resonant, eternally-returning," is to be delivered into a system whose only aim is to violate the Cycle. Taking and not giving back, demanding that "productivity" and "earnings" keep on increasing with time, the System removing from the rest of the World these vast quantities of energy to keep its own tiny desperate fraction showing a profit: and not only most of humanity — most of the World, animal, vegetable, and mineral, is laid waste in the process. The System may or may not understand that it's only buying time. And that time is an artificial resource to being with, of no value to anyone or anything but the System, which must sooner or later crash to its death, when its addiction to energy has become more than the rest of the World can supply, dragging with it innocent souls all along the chain of life.

„In the eighteenth century it was often convenient to regard man as a clockwork automaton.“

— Thomas Pynchon
Context: In the eighteenth century it was often convenient to regard man as a clockwork automaton. In the nineteenth century, with Newtonian physics pretty well assimilated and a lot of work in thermodynamics going on, man was looked on as a heat engine, about 40 per cent efficient. Now in the twentieth century, with nuclear and subatomic physics a going thing, man had become something which absorbs X-rays, gamma rays and neutrons. Chapter Ten, Part II

„Paranoia's the garlic in life's kitchen“

— Thomas Pynchon
Context: Paranoia's the garlic in life's kitchen, right, you can never have too much. p. 11 <!-- (The Penguin Press, 2013, US hardcover edition) -->

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