Frases de Nathaniel Hawthorne

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Nathaniel Hawthorne

Data de nascimento: 4. Julho 1804
Data de falecimento: 19. Maio 1864

Publicidade

Nathaniel Hawthorne foi um escritor norte-americano, considerado o primeiro grande escritor dos Estados Unidos e o maior contista de seu país, sendo o responsável por tornar decisivamente o puritanismo americano um dos temas centrais da tradição gótica.

Citações Nathaniel Hawthorne

„As carícias são tão necessárias para a vida dos sentimentos como as folhas para as árvores. Sem elas, o amor morre pela raiz.“

—  Nathaniel Hawthorne
Caresses, expressions of one sort or another, are necessary to the life of the affections, as leaves are to the life of a tree. If they are wholly restrained, love will die at the roots. Our old home: a series of English sketches‎ - Página 236 http://books.google.com.br/books?id=-kYgAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA236, Nathaniel Hawthorne - Houghton, Mifflin, 1868 - 380 páginas

„Ninguém pode, por muito tempo, ter um rosto para si mesmo e outro para a multidão sem no final confundir qual deles é o verdadeiro.“

—  Nathaniel Hawthorne
No man for any considerate period can wear one face to himself and another to the multitude without finally getting bewildered as to which may be the true. Nathaniel Hawthorne citado em "The American mercury", Volume 58‎ - Página 693, George Jean Nathan, Henry Louis Mencken - American Mercury, 1944

Publicidade

„Easy reading is damn hard writing.“

—  Nathaniel Hawthorne
Disputed, Also attributed to Ernest Hemingway and others; the earliest definite occurrence of this yet found in research for Wikiquote is by Maya Angelou, who stated it in Conversations With Maya Angelou (1989) edited by Jeffrey M. Elliot: I think it's Alexander Pope who says, "Easy writing is damn hard reading," and vice versa, easy reading is damn hard writing The statement she referred to is most probably: You write with ease, to show your breeding, But easy writing's curst hard reading Clio's Protest, or the Picture Varnished (written 1771, published 1819) by Richard Brinsley Sheridan

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„What, in the name of common-sense, had I to do with any better society than I had always lived in?“

—  Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Blithedale Romance
The Blithedale Romance (1852), Context: What, in the name of common-sense, had I to do with any better society than I had always lived in? It had satisfied me well enough. My pleasant bachelor-parlor, sunny and shadowy, curtained and carpeted, with the bedchamber adjoining... my evening at the billiard club, the concert, the theatre, or at somebody's party, if I pleased - what could be better than all this? Was it better to hoe, to mow, to toil and moil amidst the accumulations of a barnyard; to be the chambermaid of two yoke of oxen and a dozen cows; to eat salt beef, and earn it with the sweat of my brow, and thereby take the tough morsel out of some wretch's mouth, into whose vocation I had thrust myself?

„The moment when a man's head drops off is seldom or never, I am inclined to think, precisely the most agreeable of his life.“

—  Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter
The Scarlet Letter (1850), Context: The moment when a man's head drops off is seldom or never, I am inclined to think, precisely the most agreeable of his life. Nevertheless, like the greater part of our misfortunes, even so serious a contingency brings its remedy and consolation with it, if the sufferer will but make the best, rather than the worst, of the accident which has befallen him. Introduction: The Custom-House

„Holligsworth would have gone with me to the hither verge of life, and have sent his friendly and hopeful accents far over on the other side, while I should be treading the unknown path.“

—  Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Blithedale Romance
The Blithedale Romance (1852), Context: Hollingworth's more than brotherly attendance gave me inexpressible comfort. Most men - and certainly I could not always claim to be one of the exceptions - have a natural indifference, if not an absolute hostile feeling, towards those whose disease, or weakness, or calamity of any kind causes to falter or faint among the rude jostle of our existence. The education of Christianity, it is true, the sympathy of a like experience and the example of women, may soften and, possibly, subvert this ugly characteristic of our sex; but it is originally there, and has likewise its analogy in the practice of our brute brethren, who hunt the sick and disabled member of the herd from among them, as an enemy. It is for this reason that the stricken deer goes apart, and the sick lion grimly withdraws into his den. Except in love, or the attachments of kindred, or other very long and habitual affection, we really have no tenderness. But there was something of the woman moulded into the great, stalwart frame of Holligsworth; nor was he ashamed of it, as men often are of what is best in them, nor seemed ever to know that there was such a soft place in his heart. I knew it well, however, at that time, although afterwards it came nigh to be forgotten. Methought there could not be two such men alive as Holligsworth. There never was any blaze of a fireside that warmed and cheered me, in the down—sinkings and shiverings of my spirit, so effectually as did the light out of those eyes, which lay so deep and dark under his shaggy brows. Happy the man that has such a friend beside him when he comes to die!... How many men, I wonder, does one meet with in a lifetime, whom he would choose for his deathbed companions! It still impresses me as almost a matter of regret that I did not die then, when I had tolerably made up my mind to it; for Holligsworth would have gone with me to the hither verge of life, and have sent his friendly and hopeful accents far over on the other side, while I should be treading the unknown path.

„A high truth, indeed, fairly, finely, and skilfully wrought out, brightening at every step, and crowning the final development of a work of fiction, may add an artistic glory, but is never any truer, and seldom any more evident, at the last page than at the first.“

—  Nathaniel Hawthorne, livro The House of the Seven Gables
The House of the Seven Gables (1851), Context: Many writers lay very great stress upon some definite moral purpose, at which they profess to aim their works. Not to be deficient in this particular, the author has provided himself with a moral, — the truth, namely, that the wrong-doing of one generation lives into the successive ones, and, divesting itself of every temporary advantage, becomes a pure and uncontrollable mischief; and he would feel it a singular gratification if this romance might effectually convince mankind — or, indeed, any one man — of the folly of tumbling down an avalanche of ill-gotten gold, or real estate, on the heads of an unfortunate posterity, thereby to maim and crush them, until the accumulated mass shall be scattered abroad in its original atoms. In good faith, however, he is not sufficiently imaginative to flatter himself with the slightest hope of this kind. When romances do really teach anything, or produce any effective operation, it is usually through a far more subtile process than the ostensible one. The author has considered it hardly worth his while, therefore, relentlessly to impale the story with its moral as with an iron rod, — or, rather, as by sticking a pin through a butterfly, — thus at once depriving it of life, and causing it to stiffen in an ungainly and unnatural attitude. A high truth, indeed, fairly, finely, and skilfully wrought out, brightening at every step, and crowning the final development of a work of fiction, may add an artistic glory, but is never any truer, and seldom any more evident, at the last page than at the first. Preface

„I do detest all offices — all, at least, that are held on a political tenure.“

—  Nathaniel Hawthorne
Notebooks, The American Notebooks (1835 - 1853), Context: I do detest all offices — all, at least, that are held on a political tenure. And I want nothing to do with politicians. Their hearts wither away, and die out of their bodies. Their consciences are turned to india-rubber, or to some substance as black as that, and which will stretch as much. 1840

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“