Frases de Catulo

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Catulo

Data de nascimento: 84 a.C.
Data de falecimento: 54 a.C.
Outros nomes: Catullus, Catullus Gaius Valerius, Гай Валерий Катулл

Publicidade

Caio Valério Cátulo ou Catulo foi um sofisticado e controverso poeta romano durante o final do período republicano.

Cátulo se liga a um círculo de poetas de ideais estéticos comuns, os quais, Cícero chama de poetas novos , termo este, carregado de sentido pejorativo. Esse grupo de poetas rompia com o passado literário romano , passando, entre outras características, a utilizar uma temática considerada “menor” pelos seus críticos.

Acrescenta-se às características da poesia de Cátulo, a linguagem coloquial , a simulação frequente de improviso na sintaxe , versos ligeiros e a simulação do acesso aos recantos mais íntimos do homem.

Sua obra se perpetuou através dos séculos que se seguiram, foi exemplo para grandes nomes posteriores, como Propércio e Tibulo. Também foi muito lido por poetas como T. S. Eliot e Charles Baudelaire.

Citações Catulo

„Dá-me mil beijos, e mais cem/ e novamente mil e mais cem,/ e depois mais mil, e mais cem.“

—  Catulo
Fonte: Revista Caras http://www.caras.com.br, edição 679, de Novembro de 2006.

Publicidade

„Idleness ere now has ruined both kings and wealthy cities.“

—  Gaio Valerio Catullo, list of poems by Catullus
Carmina, Otium et reges prius et beatas perdidit urbes. LI, last lines

„Suns may set and rise again. For us, when the short light has once set, remains to be slept the sleep of one unbroken night.“

—  Gaio Valerio Catullo, list of poems by Catullus
Carmina, Context: Let us live, my Lesbia, and love, and value at one farthing all the talk of crabbed old men. Suns may set and rise again. For us, when the short light has once set, remains to be slept the sleep of one unbroken night. V, lines 1–6 Thomas Campion's translation: My sweetest Lesbia, let us live and love; And though the sager sort our deeds reprove, Let us not weigh them: Heaven's great lamps do dive Into their west, and straight again revive, But, soon as once set is our little light, Then must we sleep one ever-during night. From A Book of Airs (1601)

„What he himself is, whether he is or is not, he does not know so much as this.“

—  Gaio Valerio Catullo, list of poems by Catullus
Carmina, Ipse qui sit, utrum sit an non sit, id quoque nescit. XVII, line 22

„As a flower springs up secretly in a fenced garden, unknown to the cattle, torn up by no plough, which the winds caress, the sun strengthens, the shower draws forth, many boys, many girls, desire it.“

—  Gaio Valerio Catullo, list of poems by Catullus
Carmina, Ut flos in saeptis secretus nascitur hortis, Ignotus pecori, nullo contusus aratro, Quem mulcent aurae, firmat sol, educat imber; Multi illum pueri, multae optavere puellae. LXII

„Give me a thousand kisses, then a hundred, then another thousand, then a second hundred, then yet another thousand, then a hundred.“

—  Gaio Valerio Catullo, list of poems by Catullus
Carmina, Da mi basia mille, deinde centum, dein mille altera, dein secunda centum, deinde usque altera mille, deinde centum. V, lines 8–7

„Mourn, ye Graces and Loves, and all you whom the Graces love. My lady's sparrow is dead, the sparrow my lady's pet, whom she loved more than her own eyes.“

—  Gaio Valerio Catullo, list of poems by Catullus
Carmina, Lugete, O Veneres Cupidinesque, Et quantum est hominum venustiorum. Passer mortuus est meae puellae, Passer, deliciae meae puellae. III, lines 1–4 Lord Byron's translation: Ye Cupids, droop each little head, Nor let your wings with joy be spread: My Lesbia's favourite bird is dead, Whom dearer than her eyes she loved.

„To whom am I to present my pretty new book, freshly smoothed off with dry pumice stone?“

—  Gaio Valerio Catullo, list of poems by Catullus
Carmina, Cui dono lepidum novum libellum Arido modo pumice expolitum? I, lines 1–2

„Ah, what is more blessed than to put cares away, when the mind lays by its burden, and tired with labour of far travel we have come to our own home and rest on the couch we longed for? This it is which alone is worth all these toils.“

—  Gaio Valerio Catullo, list of poems by Catullus
Carmina, O quid solutis est beatius curis, cum mens onus reponit, ac peregrino labore fessi venimus larem ad nostrum, desideratoque acquiescimus lecto? hoc est quod unum est pro laboribus tantis. XXXI, lines 7–11

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„Wandering through many countries and over many seas I come, my brother, to these sorrowful obsequies, to present you with the last guerdon of death, and speak, though in vain, to your silent ashes, since fortune has taken your own self away from me—alas, my brother, so cruelly torn from me! Yet now meanwhile take these offerings, which by the custom of our fathers have been handed down—a sorrowful tribute—for a funeral sacrifice; take them, wet with many tears of a brother, and for ever, my brother, hail and farewell!“

—  Gaio Valerio Catullo, list of poems by Catullus
Carmina, Multas per gentes et multa per aequora vectus Advenio has miseras, frater, ad inferias, Ut te postremo donarem munere mortis Et mutam nequiquam alloquerer cinerem. Quandoquidem fortuna mihi tete abstulit ipsum, Heu miser indigne frater adempte mihi, Nunc tamen interea haec prisco quae more parentum Tradita sunt tristi munere ad inferias, Accipe fraterno multum manantia fletu, Atque in perpetuum, frater, ave atque vale. CI, lines 1–10 Sir William Marris's translation: By many lands and over many a wave I come, my brother, to your piteous grave, To bring you the last offering in death And o'er dumb dust expend an idle breath; For fate has torn your living self from me, And snatched you, brother, O, how cruelly! Yet take these gifts, brought as our fathers bade For sorrow's tribute to the passing shade; A brother's tears have wet them o'er and o'er; And so, my brother, hail, and farewell evermore!

„Leave off wishing to deserve any thanks from anyone, or thinking that anyone can ever become grateful.“

—  Gaio Valerio Catullo, list of poems by Catullus
Carmina, Desine de quoquam quicquam bene velle mereri, Aut aliquem fieri posse putare pium. LXXIII, lines 1–2

„Now he goes along the dark road, thither whence they say no one returns.“

—  Gaio Valerio Catullo, list of poems by Catullus
Carmina, Qui nunc it per iter tenebricosum illuc, unde negant redire quemquam. III, lines 11–12

„If I have led a pure life.“

—  Gaio Valerio Catullo, list of poems by Catullus
Carmina, Si vitam puriter egi. LXXVI, line 19

„What is given by the gods more desirable than the fortunate hour?“

—  Gaio Valerio Catullo, list of poems by Catullus
Carmina, Quid datur a divis felici optatius hora? LXII

„He seems to me to be equal to a god, he, if it may be, seems to surpass the very gods, who sitting opposite thee again and again gazes at thee and hears thee sweetly laughing.“

—  Gaio Valerio Catullo, list of poems by Catullus
Carmina, Ille mi par esse Deo videtur, ille, si fas est, superare Divos, qui sedens adversus identidem te spectat et audit dulce ridentem. LI, lines 1–5. Cf. Sappho 31.

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“