Frases de William Wordsworth

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William Wordsworth

Data de nascimento: 7. Abril 1770
Data de falecimento: 23. Abril 1850
Outros nomes: ویلیام وردزورث, Уильям Вордсворт

William Wordsworth foi o maior poeta romântico inglês que, ao lado de Samuel Taylor Coleridge, ajudou a lançar o romantismo na literatura inglesa com a publicação conjunta, em 1798, das Lyrical Ballads .

Obras

Lyrical Ballads
William Wordsworth

Citações William Wordsworth

„A verdadeira beleza vive em refúgios profundos, cujo véu é irremovível, até que coração e coração em concordância batam. E o amor é amado.“

—  William Wordsworth

True beauty dwells in deep retreats, Whose veil is unremoved Till heart with heart in concord beats, And the lover is beloved.
The poetical works of William Wordsworth: in eight volumes, Volume 4‎ - Página 177 http://books.google.com.br/books?id=I7IDAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA177, D. Bryce, 1827

„Come forth into the light of things,
Let Nature be your teacher.“

—  William Wordsworth, livro Lyrical Ballads

The Tables Turned, st. 4 (1798).
Lyrical Ballads (1798–1800)

„The best portion of a good man's life: his little, nameless unremembered acts of kindness and love.“

—  William Wordsworth, livro Lyrical Ballads

Stanza 2.
Fonte: Lyrical Ballads (1798–1800), Lines written a few miles above Tintern Abbey (1798)
Contexto: These beauteous forms,
Through a long absence, have not been to me
As is a landscape to a blind man's eye:
But oft, in lonely rooms, and 'mid the din
Of towns and cities, I have owed to them,
In hours of weariness, sensations sweet,
Felt in the blood, and felt along the heart;
And passing even into my purer mind,
With tranquil restoration:—feelings too
Of unremembered pleasure: such, perhaps,
As have no slight or trivial influence
On that best portion of a good man's life,
His little, nameless, unremembered acts
Of kindness and of love. Nor less, I trust,
To them I may have owed another gift,
Of aspect more sublime; that blessed mood,
In which the burthen of the mystery,
In which the heavy and the weary weight
Of all this unintelligible world
Is lighten'd:—that serene and blessed mood,
In which the affections gently lead us on,—
Until, the breath of this corporeal frame
And even the motion of our human blood
Almost suspended, we are laid asleep
In body, and become a living soul:
While with an eye made quiet by the power
Of harmony, and the deep power of joy,
We see into the life of things.

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„Now wilt thou then forget,
That after many wanderings, many years
Of absence, these steep woods and lofty cliffs,
And this green pastoral landscape, were to me
More dear, both for themselves, and for thy sake.“

—  William Wordsworth, livro Lyrical Ballads

Stanza 4.
Lyrical Ballads (1798–1800), Lines written a few miles above Tintern Abbey (1798)
Contexto: If I should be, where I no more can hear
Thy voice, nor catch from thy wild eyes these gleams
Of past existence, wilt thou then forget
That on the banks of this delightful stream
We stood together; And that I, so long
A worshipper of Nature, hither came,
Unwearied in that service: rather say
With warmer love, oh! with far deeper zeal
Of holier love. Now wilt thou then forget,
That after many wanderings, many years
Of absence, these steep woods and lofty cliffs,
And this green pastoral landscape, were to me
More dear, both for themselves, and for thy sake.

„A Poet worthy of Rob Roy
Must scorn a timid song.“

—  William Wordsworth

Rob Roy's Grave, st. 3.
Memorials of a Tour in Scotland (1803)
Contexto: Yet was Rob Roy as wise as brave;
Forgive me if the phrase be strong;—
A Poet worthy of Rob Roy
Must scorn a timid song.

„Free as a bird to settle where I will.“

—  William Wordsworth, livro The Prelude

Bk. I, l. 1.
The Prelude (1799-1805)
Contexto: Oh there is blessing in this gentle breeze,
A visitant that while it fans my cheek
Doth seem half-conscious of the joy it brings
From the green fields, and from yon azure sky.
Whate'er its mission, the soft breeze can come
To none more grateful than to me; escaped
From the vast city, where I long had pined
A discontented sojourner: now free,
Free as a bird to settle where I will.

„O be wiser, thou !
Instructed that true knowledge leads to love;
True dignity abides with him alone
Who, in the silent hour of inward thought,
Can still suspect, and still revere himself,
In lowliness of heart.“

—  William Wordsworth

Lines (1795)
Contexto: If Thou be one whose heart the holy forms
Of young imagination have kept pure
Stranger! henceforth be warned; and know that pride,
Howe'er disguised in its own majesty,
Is littleness; that he who feels contempt
For any living thing, hath faculties
Which he has never used; that thought with him
Is in its infancy. The man whose eye
Is ever on himself doth look on one,
The least of Nature's works, one who might move
The wise man to that scorn which wisdom holds
Unlawful, ever. O be wiser, thou!
Instructed that true knowledge leads to love;
True dignity abides with him alone
Who, in the silent hour of inward thought,
Can still suspect, and still revere himself,
In lowliness of heart.

„A living thing
Produced too slowly ever to decay;
Of form and aspect too magnificent
To be destroyed.“

—  William Wordsworth

Yew-Trees, l. 9 (1803).
Contexto: Of vast circumference and gloom profound,
This solitary Tree! A living thing
Produced too slowly ever to decay;
Of form and aspect too magnificent
To be destroyed.

„The picture of the mind revives again:
While here I stand, not only with the sense
Of present pleasure, but with pleasing thoughts
That in this moment there is life and food
For future years.“

—  William Wordsworth, livro Lyrical Ballads

Stanza 3.
Lyrical Ballads (1798–1800), Lines written a few miles above Tintern Abbey (1798)
Contexto: And now, with gleams of half-extinguished thought,
With many recognitions dim and faint,
And somewhat of a sad perplexity,
The picture of the mind revives again:
While here I stand, not only with the sense
Of present pleasure, but with pleasing thoughts
That in this moment there is life and food
For future years. And so I dare to hope,
Though changed, no doubt, from what I was when first
I came among these hills;

„From the sweet thoughts of home
And from all hope I was forever hurled.“

—  William Wordsworth

Guilt and Sorrow, st. 41 (1791-1794) Section XL
Contexto: From the sweet thoughts of home
And from all hope I was forever hurled.
For me—farthest from earthly port to roam
Was best, could I but shun the spot where man might come.

„We feel that we are greater than we know.“

—  William Wordsworth

The River Duddon, sonnet 34 - Afterthought, l. 13 (1820).
Contexto: Through love, through hope, and faith's transcendent dower,
We feel that we are greater than we know.

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