Citações William Butler Yeats

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„Come near; I would, before my time to go,
Sing of old Eire and the ancient ways:
Red Rose, proud Rose, sad Rose of all my days.“

—  W.B. Yeats
The Rose (1893), Context: Come near, come near, come near — Ah, leave me still A little space for the rose-breath to fill! Lest I no more hear common things that crave; The weak worm hiding down in its small cave, The field-mouse running by me in the grass, And heavy mortal hopes that toil and pass; But seek alone to hear the strange things said By God to the bright hearts of those long dead, And learn to chaunt a tongue men do not know. Come near; I would, before my time to go, Sing of old Eire and the ancient ways: Red Rose, proud Rose, sad Rose of all my days. To The Rose Upon The Rood Of Time

„We are but critics, or but half create,
Timid, entangled, empty and abashed,
Lacking the countenance of our friends.“

—  W.B. Yeats
The Wild Swans at Coole (1919), Context: We have lit upon the gentle, sensitive mind And lost the old nonchalance of the hand; Whether we have chosen chisel, pen or brush, We are but critics, or but half create, Timid, entangled, empty and abashed, Lacking the countenance of our friends. Ego Dominus Tuus http://poetry.poetryx.com/poems/1478/, st. 4

„Come near, come near, come near — Ah, leave me still
A little space for the rose-breath to fill!“

—  W.B. Yeats
The Rose (1893), Context: Come near, come near, come near — Ah, leave me still A little space for the rose-breath to fill! Lest I no more hear common things that crave; The weak worm hiding down in its small cave, The field-mouse running by me in the grass, And heavy mortal hopes that toil and pass; But seek alone to hear the strange things said By God to the bright hearts of those long dead, And learn to chaunt a tongue men do not know. Come near; I would, before my time to go, Sing of old Eire and the ancient ways: Red Rose, proud Rose, sad Rose of all my days. To The Rose Upon The Rood Of Time

„Time can but make it easier to be wise
Though now it seems impossible, and so
All that you need is patience.“

—  W.B. Yeats
In The Seven Woods (1904), Context: One that is ever kind said yesterday: 'Your well-belovéd's hair has threads of grey, And little shadows come about her eyes; Time can but make it easier to be wise Though now it seems impossible, and so All that you need is patience.' Heart cries, 'No, I have not a crumb of comfort, not a grain. Time can but make her beauty over again: Because of that great nobleness of hers The fire that stirs about her, when she stirs, Burns but more clearly. O she had not these ways When all the wild summer was in her gaze.' O heart! O heart! if she'd but turn her head, You'd know the folly of being comforted. The Folly Of Being Comforted http://poetry.poetryx.com/poems/1623/

„She bid me take life easy, as the grass grows on the weirs;
But I was young and foolish, and now am full of tears.“

—  W.B. Yeats
Crossways (1889), Context: p>Down by the salley gardens my love and I did meet; She passed the salley gardens with little snow-white feet. She bid me take love easy, as the leaves grow on the tree; But I, being young and foolish, with her would not agree.In a field by the river my love and I did stand, And on my leaning shoulder she laid her snow-white hand. She bid me take life easy, as the grass grows on the weirs; But I was young and foolish, and now am full of tears.</p Down By The Salley Gardens http://poetry.poetryx.com/poems/1476/

„Yet she, singing upon her road,
Half lion, half child, is at peace.“

—  W.B. Yeats
The Green Helmet and Other Poems (1910), Context: p>O heart, be at peace, because Nor knave nor dolt can break What's not for their applause Being for a woman's sake. Enough if the work has seemed, So did she your strength renew, A dream that a lion had dreamed Till the wilderness cried aloud, A secret between you two, Between the proud and the proud.What, still you would have their praise! But here's a haughtier text, The labyrinth of her days That her own strangeness perplexed; And how what her dreaming gave Earned slander, ingratitude, From self-same dolt and knave; Aye, and worse wrong than these. Yet she, singing upon her road, Half lion, half child, is at peace.</p Against Unworthy Praise http://poetry.poetryx.com/poems/1433/

„He that sings a lasting song
Thinks in a marrow-bone.“

—  W.B. Yeats
A Full Moon in March (1935), Context: God guard me from those thoughts men think In the mind alone; He that sings a lasting song Thinks in a marrow-bone. A Prayer For Old Age http://poetry.poetryx.com/poems/1423/, st. 1.

„What matter that no cannon had been turned
Into a ploughshare?“

—  W.B. Yeats, livro The Tower
The Tower (1928), Nineteen Hundred And Nineteen http://poetry.poetryx.com/poems/1547/, Context: All teeth were drawn, all ancient tricks unlearned, And a great army but a showy thing; What matter that no cannon had been turned Into a ploughshare? I, st. 3

„Speech after long silence; it is right“

—  W.B. Yeats, livro The Winding Stair and Other Poems
The Winding Stair and Other Poems (1933), Context: Speech after long silence; it is right, All other lovers being estranged or dead, Unfriendly lamplight hid under its shade, The curtains drawn upon unfriendly night, That we descant and yet again descant Upon the supreme theme of Art and Song: Bodily decrepitude is wisdom; young We loved each other and were ignorant. After Long Silence http://poetry.poetryx.com/poems/1432/

„All that sternness amid charm,
All that sweetness amid strength?“

—  W.B. Yeats
The Green Helmet and Other Poems (1910), Context: Ah, that Time could touch a form That could show what Homer's age Bred to be a hero's wage. 'Were not all her life but a storm, Would not painters pain a form Of such noble lines,' I said, 'Such a delicate high head, All that sternness amid charm, All that sweetness amid strength? Ah, but peace that comes at length, Came when Time had touched her form. Peace http://poetry.poetryx.com/poems/1564/

„The shallowest people on the ridge of the earth.“

—  W.B. Yeats
Context: I hate journalists. There is nothing in them but tittering jeering emptiness. They have all made what Dante calls the Great Refusal, — that is they have ceased to be self-centered, have given up their individuality.... The shallowest people on the ridge of the earth. Letter to Katharine Tynan (30 August 1888)

„Now his wars on God begin;
At stroke of midnight God shall win.“

—  W.B. Yeats
Parnell's Funeral and Other Poems http://worldebooklibrary.com/eBooks/WorldeBookLibrary.com/ytpafu.htm (1935). Supernatural Songs http://worldebooklibrary.com/eBooks/WorldeBookLibrary.com/ytpafu.htm#1_0_7, Context: p>Then he struggled with the mind; His proud heart he left behind. Now his wars on God begin; At stroke of midnight God shall win.</p

„Labour is blossoming or dancing where
The body is not bruised to pleasure soul.“

—  W.B. Yeats, livro The Tower
The Tower (1928), Context: Labour is blossoming or dancing where The body is not bruised to pleasure soul. Nor beauty born out of its own despair, Nor blear-eyed wisdom out of midnight oil. O chestnut-tree, great-rooted blossomer, Are you the leaf, the blossom or the bole? O body swayed to music, O brightening glance, How can we know the dancer from the dance? Among School Children http://poetry.poetryx.com/poems/1437/, st. 8

„The hourly kindness, the day’s common speech,
The habitual content of each with each
When neither soul nor body has been crossed.“

—  W.B. Yeats
The Green Helmet and Other Poems (1910), Context: I that have not your faith, how shall I know That in the blinding light beyond the grave We’ll find so good a thing as that we have lost? The hourly kindness, the day’s common speech, The habitual content of each with each When neither soul nor body has been crossed. King and No King http://poetry.poetryx.com/poems/1521/

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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