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Thomas More

Data de nascimento: 7. Fevereiro 1478
Data de falecimento: 6. Julho 1535
Outros nomes: San Tommaso Moro

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Thomas More, Thomas Morus ou Tomás Moro foi filósofo, homem de estado, diplomata, escritor, advogado e homem de leis, ocupou vários cargos públicos, e em especial, de 1529 a 1532, o cargo de "Lord Chancellor" de Henrique VIII da Inglaterra. É geralmente considerado como um dos grandes humanistas do Renascimento. Sua principal obra literária é Utopia.

Foi canonizado como mártir da Igreja Católica em 19 de maio de 1935 e sua festa litúrgica celebra-se em 22 de junho.

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Citações Thomas More

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„A qualquer um, nada agrada tanto quanto as suas próprias opiniões.“

—  Thomas More
Utopia (1516), Utopia, Página 11 http://books.google.com.br/books?ei=KPRbVLHuA7HCsASc4oD4Aw&hl=pt-BR&id=GvxHAAAAYAAJ&dq=utopia+zang%C3%B5es&focus=searchwithinvolume&q=agrada, Sir Thomas More (Saint) - Prefácio: João Almino; Tradução: Anah de Melo Franco - IPRI, 2004 - 167 páginas. "Et certe sic est natura comparatum, ut sua cuique inuenta blandiantur." De Optimo Reipublicae Statu, Deque nova insula Utopia. Página 34 https://la.wikisource.org/wiki/Pagina:Utopia,_More,_1518.djvu/35, Thomas More - Froben, 1518 - 190 páginas.

„São muito numerosos os nobres que vivem ociosamente como verdadeiros zangões; eles vivem do suor dos outros e esfolam e sugam o sangue dos vassalos que vivem em suas terras.“

—  Thomas More
Utopia (1516), Utopia, Página 14 http://books.google.com.br/books?ei=KPRbVLHuA7HCsASc4oD4Aw&hl=pt-BR&id=GvxHAAAAYAAJ&dq=utopia+zang%C3%B5es&focus=searchwithinvolume&q=zang%C3%B5es, Sir Thomas More (Saint) - Prefácio: João Almino; Tradução: Anah de Melo Franco - IPRI, 2004 - 167 páginas. "Tantus est ergo nobilium numerus, qui non ipsi modo degant ociosi tanquam fuci laboribus aliorum, quos puta suorum praediorum colonos augendis reditibus ad uiuum usque radunt." De Optimo Reipublicae Statu, Deque nova insula Utopia. Página 36 https://la.wikisource.org/wiki/Pagina:Utopia,_More,_1518.djvu/37, Thomas More - Froben, 1518 - 190 páginas.

„Deus retirou ao homem o direito sobre a vida dos outros, e mesmo sobre a sua, e os homens poderiam acordar entre si, circunstâncias autorizando que se matassem reciprocamente? Isentos de lei divina, quando deus não lhe previu nenhuma excepção, os contratantes enviariam para a morte aqueles que a ela tivessem sido condenados por um julgamento humano?“

—  Thomas More
Utopia (1516), Utopia, Página 13 http://books.google.com.br/books?id=NUhaAgAAQBAJ&pg=PT13, Thomas More - Atlântico Press, 2013 - 95 páginas. "Deus non alienae modo, uerum etiam suae cuique mortis ius ademerit, si hominum inter se consensus de mutua cede, certis placitis consentientium, adeo debet ualere, ut illius praecepti uinculis eximat suos satellites, qui sine ullo exemplo dei, eos interemerint, quos humana sanctio iussit occidi;" De Optimo Reipublicae Statu, Deque nova insula Utopia. Página 44 https://la.wikisource.org/wiki/Pagina:Utopia,_More,_1518.djvu/45, Thomas More - Froben, 1518 - 190 páginas.

„Estou plenamente convencido de que, a menos que a propriedade privada seja completamente abolida, não é possível haver distribuição justa de bens e nem a humanidade pode ser governada adequadamente.“

—  Thomas More
Utopia (1516), Utopia, Página 43 http://books.google.com.br/books?ei=KPRbVLHuA7HCsASc4oD4Aw&hl=pt-BR&id=GvxHAAAAYAAJ&dq=utopia+zang%C3%B5es&focus=searchwithinvolume&q=plenamente, Sir Thomas More (Saint) - Prefácio: João Almino; Tradução: Anah de Melo Franco - IPRI, 2004 - 167 páginas. "Adeo mihi certe persuadeo, res aequabili ac iusta aliqua ratione distribui, aut feliciter agi cum rebus mortalium, nisi sublata prorsus proprietate, non posse." De Optimo Reipublicae Statu, Deque nova insula Utopia. Página 66 https://la.wikisource.org/wiki/Pagina:Utopia,_More,_1518.djvu/67, Thomas More - Froben, 1518 - 190 páginas.

„I think putting thieves to death is not lawful; and it is plain and obvious that it is absurd and of ill consequence to the commonwealth that a thief and a murderer should be equally punished“

—  Thomas More, Utopia
Utopia (1516), Context: I think putting thieves to death is not lawful; and it is plain and obvious that it is absurd and of ill consequence to the commonwealth that a thief and a murderer should be equally punished; for if a robber sees that his danger is the same if he is convicted of theft as if he were guilty of murder, this will naturally incite him to kill the person whom otherwise he would only have robbed; since, if the punishment is the same, there is more security, and less danger of discovery, when he that can best make it is put out of the way; so that terrifying thieves too much provokes them to cruelty. Ch. 1 : Discourses of Raphael Hythloday, of the Best State of a Commonwealth

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„This law was made by Utopus, not only for preserving the public peace, which he saw suffered much by daily contentions and irreconcilable heats, but because he thought the interest of religion itself required it.“

—  Thomas More, Utopia
Utopia (1516), Context: Utopus having understood that before his coming among them the old inhabitants had been engaged in great quarrels concerning religion, by which they were so divided among themselves, that he found it an easy thing to conquer them, since, instead of uniting their forces against him, every different party in religion fought by themselves. After he had subdued them he made a law that every man might be of what religion he pleased, and might endeavour to draw others to it by the force of argument and by amicable and modest ways, but without bitterness against those of other opinions; but that he ought to use no other force but that of persuasion, and was neither to mix with it reproaches nor violence; and such as did otherwise were to be condemned to banishment or slavery. This law was made by Utopus, not only for preserving the public peace, which he saw suffered much by daily contentions and irreconcilable heats, but because he thought the interest of religion itself required it. He judged it not fit to determine anything rashly; and seemed to doubt whether those different forms of religion might not all come from God, who might inspire man in a different manner, and be pleased with this variety; he therefore thought it indecent and foolish for any man to threaten and terrify another to make him believe what did not appear to him to be true. And supposing that only one religion was really true, and the rest false, he imagined that the native force of truth would at last break forth and shine bright, if supported only by the strength of argument, and attended to with a gentle and unprejudiced mind; while, on the other hand, if such debates were carried on with violence and tumults, as the most wicked are always the most obstinate, so the best and most holy religion might be choked with superstition, as corn is with briars and thorns; he therefore left men wholly to their liberty, that they might be free to believe as they should see cause. Ch. 9 : Of the Religions of the Utopians

„Upon his having frequently preached in this manner he was seized, and after trial he was condemned to banishment, not for having disparaged their religion, but for his inflaming the people to sedition; for this is one of their most ancient laws, that no man ought to be punished for his religion.“

—  Thomas More, Utopia
Utopia (1516), Context: Those among them that have not received our religion do not fright any from it, and use none ill that goes over to it, so that all the while I was there one man was only punished on this occasion. He being newly baptised did, notwithstanding all that we could say to the contrary, dispute publicly concerning the Christian religion, with more zeal than discretion, and with so much heat, that he not only preferred our worship to theirs, but condemned all their rites as profane, and cried out against all that adhered to them as impious and sacrilegious persons, that were to be damned to everlasting burnings. Upon his having frequently preached in this manner he was seized, and after trial he was condemned to banishment, not for having disparaged their religion, but for his inflaming the people to sedition; for this is one of their most ancient laws, that no man ought to be punished for his religion. Ch. 9 : Of the Religions of the Utopians

„They have no lawyers among them, for they consider them as a sort of people whose profession it is to disguise matters and to wrest the laws, and, therefore, they think it is much better that every man should plead his own cause“

—  Thomas More, Utopia
Utopia (1516), Context: They have no lawyers among them, for they consider them as a sort of people whose profession it is to disguise matters and to wrest the laws, and, therefore, they think it is much better that every man should plead his own cause, and trust it to the judge, as in other places the client trusts it to a counsellor; by this means they both cut off many delays and find out truth more certainly; for after the parties have laid open the merits of the cause, without those artifices which lawyers are apt to suggest, the judge examines the whole matter, and supports the simplicity of such well-meaning persons, whom otherwise crafty men would be sure to run down; and thus they avoid those evils which appear very remarkably among all those nations that labour under a vast load of laws. Every one of them is skilled in their law; for, as it is a very short study, so the plainest meaning of which words are capable is always the sense of their laws; and they argue thus: all laws are promulgated for this end, that every man may know his duty; and, therefore, the plainest and most obvious sense of the words is that which ought to be put upon them, since a more refined exposition cannot be easily comprehended, and would only serve to make the laws become useless to the greater part of mankind, and especially to those who need most the direction of them; for it is all one not to make a law at all or to couch it in such terms that, without a quick apprehension and much study, a man cannot find out the true meaning of it, since the generality of mankind are both so dull, and so much employed in their several trades, that they have neither the leisure nor the capacity requisite for such an inquiry. Ch. 7 : Of Their Slaves, and of Their Marriages

„There are several sorts of religions, not only in different parts of the island, but even in every town; some worshipping the sun, others the moon or one of the planets.“

—  Thomas More, Utopia
Utopia (1516), Context: There are several sorts of religions, not only in different parts of the island, but even in every town; some worshipping the sun, others the moon or one of the planets. Some worship such men as have been eminent in former times for virtue or glory, not only as ordinary deities, but as the supreme god. Yet the greater and wiser sort of them worship none of these, but adore one eternal, invisible, infinite, and incomprehensible Deity; as a Being that is far above all our apprehensions, that is spread over the whole universe, not by His bulk, but by His power and virtue; Him they call the Father of All, and acknowledge that the beginnings, the increase, the progress, the vicissitudes, and the end of all things come only from Him; nor do they offer divine honours to any but to Him alone. And, indeed, though they differ concerning other things, yet all agree in this: that they think there is one Supreme Being that made and governs the world, whom they call, in the language of their country, Mithras. They differ in this: that one thinks the god whom he worships is this Supreme Being, and another thinks that his idol is that god; but they all agree in one principle, that whoever is this Supreme Being, He is also that great essence to whose glory and majesty all honours are ascribed by the consent of all nations. Ch. 9 : Of the Religions of the Utopians

„The channel is known only to the natives; so that if any stranger should enter into the bay without one of their pilots he would run great danger of shipwreck.“

—  Thomas More, Utopia
Utopia (1516), Context: The island of Utopia is in the middle two hundred miles broad, and holds almost at the same breadth over a great part of it, but it grows narrower towards both ends. Its figure is not unlike a crescent. Between its horns the sea comes in eleven miles broad, and spreads itself into a great bay, which is environed with land to the compass of about five hundred miles, and is well secured from winds. In this bay there is no great current; the whole coast is, as it were, one continued harbour, which gives all that live in the island great convenience for mutual commerce. But the entry into the bay, occasioned by rocks on the one hand and shallows on the other, is very dangerous. In the middle of it there is one single rock which appears above water, and may, therefore, easily be avoided; and on the top of it there is a tower, in which a garrison is kept; the other rocks lie under water, and are very dangerous. The channel is known only to the natives; so that if any stranger should enter into the bay without one of their pilots he would run great danger of shipwreck. Ch. 1 : Discourses of Raphael Hythloday, of the Best State of a Commonwealth

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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