Frases de Stonewall Jackson

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Stonewall Jackson

Data de nascimento: 21. Janeiro 1824
Data de falecimento: 10. Maio 1863

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Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson foi um militar americano, mais conhecido como um dos principais oficiais das forças armadas Confederadas durante a Guerra da Secessão e um dos colaboradores mais próximos de Robert E. Lee. Sua carreira militar inclui a Campanha do Vale de 1862 e seu serviço como comandante de corpo do Exército da Virgínia do Norte sob comando do general Lee. Soldados confederados o atingiram acidentalmente durante a Batalha de Chancellorsville em 2 de maio de 1863. Três balas atingiram Jackson: duas nas mãos e uma no braço esquerdo, entre o ombro e o cotovelo. Os ferimentos lhe causaram o amputamento do braço esquerdo. Dias depois, as 3:15 da tarde do dia 10 de maio de 1863, ele veio a falecer vítima de complicações de uma pneumonia. Sua morte foi um golpe duro para a Confederação afetando o moral do exército e o povo sulista. Atualmente é um dos grandes pilares do panteão da ideia da "Causa Perdida".

Foi considerado um dos mais brilhantes generais táticos da história dos Estados Unidos. Seu exemplar comando na Primeira Batalha de Bull Run onde se manteve firme como uma parede de pedras lhe rendeu o famoso apelido "stonewall". Se destacou igualmente em outras batalhas como na Batalha de Cedar Mountain, a Segunda Batalha de Bull Run, a Batalha de Antietam e a Batalha de Fredericksburg. Contudo, em algumas lutas, seu comando não teve grande destaque como nas Batalhas dos Sete Dias ao redor de Richmond em 1862.

Citações Stonewall Jackson

„It is man's highest interest not to violate, or attempt to violate, the rules which Infinite Wisdom has laid down.“

— Thomas Jackson
Context: It is man's highest interest not to violate, or attempt to violate, the rules which Infinite Wisdom has laid down. The means by which men are to attain great elevation may be classed in three divisions — physical, mental, and moral. Whatever relates to health, belongs to the first; whatever relates to the improvement of the mind, belongs to the second. The formation of good manners and virtuous habits constitutes the third.

„Say as little of yourself and friends as possible.“

— Thomas Jackson
Context: Never engross the whole conversation to yourself. Say as little of yourself and friends as possible.

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„I yield to no man in sympathy for the gallant men under my command; but I am obliged to sweat them tonight, so that I may save their blood tomorrow.“

— Thomas Jackson
Context: I yield to no man in sympathy for the gallant men under my command; but I am obliged to sweat them tonight, so that I may save their blood tomorrow. The line of hills southwest of Winchester must not be occupied by the enemy's artillery. My own must be there and in position by daylight. … You shall however have two hours rest. To Col. Sam Fulkerson, who reported on the weariness of their troops and suggested that they should be given an hour or so to rest from a forced march in the night. (24 May 1862); as quoted in Mighty Stonewall (1957) by Frank E. Vandiver, p. 250

„Always mystify, mislead, and surprise the enemy, if possible; and when you strike and overcome him, never let up in the pursuit so long as your men have strength to follow; for an army routed, if hotly pursued, becomes panic-stricken, and can then be destroyed by half their number.“

— Thomas Jackson
Context: Always mystify, mislead, and surprise the enemy, if possible; and when you strike and overcome him, never let up in the pursuit so long as your men have strength to follow; for an army routed, if hotly pursued, becomes panic-stricken, and can then be destroyed by half their number. The other rule is, never fight against heavy odds, if by any possible maneuvering you can hurl your own force on only a part, and that the weakest part, of your enemy and crush it. Such tactics will win every time, and a small army may thus destroy a large one in detail, and repeated victory will make it invincible. As quoted in Battles and Leaders of the Civil War (1884 - 1888) edited by Robert Underwood Clarence C. Buel, Vol. II, p. 297

„If the general government should persist in the measures now threatened, there must be war.“

— Thomas Jackson
Context: If the general government should persist in the measures now threatened, there must be war. It is painful enough to discover with what unconcern they speak of war and threaten it. They do not know its horrors. I have seen enough of it to make me look upon it as the sum of all evils. Comments to his pastor (April 1861) as quoted in [http://books.google.com/books?id=bG2vg5cH004C Memoirs of Stonewall Jackson by His Widow Mary Anna Jackson (1895)], Ch. IX : War Clouds — 1860 - 1861, p. 141; This has sometimes been paraphrased as "War is the sum of all evils." Before Jackson's application of the term "The sum of all evils" to war, it had also been applied to slavery by abolitionist Cassius Marcellus Clay in The Writings of Cassius Marcellus Clay : Including Speeches and Addresses (1848), p. 445; to death by Georg Christian Knapp in Lectures on Christian Theology (1845), p. 404; and it had also been used, apparently in relation to arrogance in a translation of "Homily 24" in The Homilies of S. John Chrysostom on the First Epistle of St. Paul the Apostle to the Corinthians (1839), p. 331 <!-- earliest use thus far found ~ Kalki 2008·01·21 -->

„To move swiftly, strike vigorously, and secure all the fruits of victory is the secret of successful war.“

— Thomas Jackson
Context: War means fighting. The business of the soldier is to fight. Armies are not called out to dig trenches, to throw up breastworks, to live in camps, but to find the enemy and strike him; to invade his country, and do him all possible damage in the shortest possible time. This will involve great destruction of life and property while it lasts; but such a war will of necessity be of brief continuance, and so would be an economy of life and property in the end. To move swiftly, strike vigorously, and secure all the fruits of victory is the secret of successful war. As quoted in [http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/12233 Stonewall Jackson and the American Civil War (1904) by George Francis Robert Henderson], Ch. 25 : The Soldier and the Man, p. 481

„I have seen enough of it to make me look upon it as the sum of all evils.“

— Thomas Jackson
Context: If the general government should persist in the measures now threatened, there must be war. It is painful enough to discover with what unconcern they speak of war and threaten it. They do not know its horrors. I have seen enough of it to make me look upon it as the sum of all evils. Comments to his pastor (April 1861) as quoted in [http://books.google.com/books?id=bG2vg5cH004C Memoirs of Stonewall Jackson by His Widow Mary Anna Jackson (1895)], Ch. IX : War Clouds — 1860 - 1861, p. 141; This has sometimes been paraphrased as "War is the sum of all evils." Before Jackson's application of the term "The sum of all evils" to war, it had also been applied to slavery by abolitionist Cassius Marcellus Clay in The Writings of Cassius Marcellus Clay : Including Speeches and Addresses (1848), p. 445; to death by Georg Christian Knapp in Lectures on Christian Theology (1845), p. 404; and it had also been used, apparently in relation to arrogance in a translation of "Homily 24" in The Homilies of S. John Chrysostom on the First Epistle of St. Paul the Apostle to the Corinthians (1839), p. 331 <!-- earliest use thus far found ~ Kalki 2008·01·21 -->

„Good-breeding is opposed to selfishness, vanity, or pride.“

— Thomas Jackson
Context: Good-breeding is opposed to selfishness, vanity, or pride. Never weary your company by talking too long or too frequently.

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„We must make this campaign an exceedingly active one. Only thus can a weaker country cope with a stronger; it must make up in activity what it lacks in strength.“

— Thomas Jackson
Context: We must make this campaign an exceedingly active one. Only thus can a weaker country cope with a stronger; it must make up in activity what it lacks in strength. A defensive campaign can only be made successful by taking the aggressive at the proper time. Napoleon never waited for his adversary to become fully prepared, but struck him the first blow. Ch. 22 : The Last Happy Days — Chancellorsville — 1863, p. 429

„War means fighting. The business of the soldier is to fight.“

— Thomas Jackson
Context: War means fighting. The business of the soldier is to fight. Armies are not called out to dig trenches, to throw up breastworks, to live in camps, but to find the enemy and strike him; to invade his country, and do him all possible damage in the shortest possible time. This will involve great destruction of life and property while it lasts; but such a war will of necessity be of brief continuance, and so would be an economy of life and property in the end. To move swiftly, strike vigorously, and secure all the fruits of victory is the secret of successful war. As quoted in [http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/12233 Stonewall Jackson and the American Civil War (1904) by George Francis Robert Henderson], Ch. 25 : The Soldier and the Man, p. 481

„The time for war has not yet come, but it will come, and that soon; and when it does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard.“

— Thomas Jackson
Speech to cadets at the Virginia Military Institute (March 1861); as quoted in Mighty Stonewall (1957) by Frank E. Vandiver, p. 131; this has sometimes been paraphrased as "When war does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard."

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„The only true rule for cavalry is to follow the enemy as long as he retreats.“

— Thomas Jackson
Statement to Colonel Thomas T. Munford (13 June 1862); as quoted in [http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/12233 Stonewall Jackson and the American Civil War (1904) by George Francis Robert Henderson] Vol. I, Ch. XI p. 392

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