Citações Marcial

„Tis a hard task this, not to sacrifice manners to wealth.“

—  Martial, livro Epigrammata

XI, 5 (Loeb translation).
Epigrams (c. 80 – 104 AD)
Original: (la) Ardua res haec est opibus non tradere mores.

„Believe me, wise men don't say ‘I shall live to do that’, tomorrow's life is too late; live today.“

—  Martial, livro Epigrammata

I, 15.
Variant translations:
'I'll live to-morrow', 'tis not wise to say:
'Twill be too late to-morrow—live to-day.
Tomorrow will I live, the fool does say;
Today itself's too late; the wise lived yesterday.
Epigrams (c. 80 – 104 AD)
Original: (la) Non est, crede mihi, sapientis dicere ‘Vivam’:
Sera nimis vita est crastina: vive hodie.

„Selius affirms, in heav'n no gods there are:
And while he thrives, and they their thunder spare,
His daring tenet to the world seems fair. Anon. 1695.“

—  Martial, livro Epigrammata

Nullos esse deos, inane caelum
Adfirmat Segius: probatque, quod se
Factum, dum negat haec, videt beatum.
IV, 21.
Epigrams (c. 80 – 104 AD)
Original: (la) Nullos esse deos, inane caelum
Adfirmat Segius: probatque, quod se
Factum, dum negat haec, videt beatum.

„Virtue extends our days: he lives two lives who relives his past with pleasure.“

—  Martial, livro Epigrammata

Ampliat aetatis spatium sibi vir bonus. Hoc est
Vivere bis vita posse priore frui.
X, 23. Alternatively translated as "The good man prolongs his life; to be able to enjoy one's past life is to live twice", in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919). Compare: "For he lives twice who can at once employ / The present well, and e'en the past enjoy", Alexander Pope, Imitation of Martial.
Epigrams (c. 80 – 104 AD)
Original: (la) Ampliat aetatis spatium sibi vir bonus. Hoc est
Vivere bis vita posse priore frui.

„You will always be poor, if you are poor, Aemilianus. Wealth is given to-day to none save the rich.“

—  Martial, livro Epigrammata

Semper eris pauper, si pauper es, Aemiliane;
Dantur opes nulli nunc, nisi divitibus.
V, 81 (Loeb translation).
Epigrams (c. 80 – 104 AD)
Original: (la) Semper eris pauper, si pauper es, Aemiliane;
Dantur opes nulli nunc, nisi divitibus.

„You invite no man to dinner, Cotta, but your bath-companion; the baths alone provide you with a guest. I was wondering why you had never asked me; now I understand that when naked I displeased you.“

—  Martial, livro Epigrammata

Invitas nullum nisi cum quo, Cotta, lavaris
et dant convivam balnea sola tibi
mirabar quare numquam me, Cotta, vocasses:
iam scio me nudum displicuisse tibi.
I, 23 (Loeb translation).
Epigrams (c. 80 – 104 AD)
Original: (la) Invitas nullum nisi cum quo, Cotta, lavaris
et dant convivam balnea sola tibi
mirabar quare numquam me, Cotta, vocasses:
iam scio me nudum displicuisse tibi.

„Tis degrading to undertake difficult trifles; and foolish is the labour spent on puerilities.“

—  Martial, livro Epigrammata

Turpe est difficiles habere nugas,
Et stultus labor est ineptiarum.
II, 86 (Loeb translation).
Epigrams (c. 80 – 104 AD)
Original: (la) Turpe est difficiles habere nugas,
Et stultus labor est ineptiarum.

„Take while you can; brief is the moment of profit.“

—  Martial, livro Epigrammata

VIII, 9.
Epigrams (c. 80 – 104 AD)
Original: (la) Accipe quam primum; brevis est occasio lucri.

„Difficult and easy-going, pleasant and churlish, you are at the same time: I can neither live with you nor without you.“

—  Martial, livro Epigrammata

Difficilis facilis iucundus acerbus es idem:
Nec possum tecum vivere nec sine te.
XII, 46
Variant translation: Difficult or easy, pleasant or bitter, you are the same you: I cannot live with you—or without you.
Compare: "Thus I can neither live with you nor without you", Ovid, Amores, Book III, xib, 39
Epigrams (c. 80 – 104 AD)
Original: (la) Difficilis facilis iucundus acerbus es idem:
Nec possum tecum vivere nec sine te.

„Let me have a plump home-born slave, have a wife not too lettered, have night with sleep, have day without a lawsuit.“

—  Martial, livro Epigrammata

Sit mihi verna satur: sit non doctissima conjux:
Sit nox cum somno: sit sine lite dies.
II, 90 (Loeb translation).
Epigrams (c. 80 – 104 AD)
Original: (la) Sit mihi verna satur: sit non doctissima conjux:
Sit nox cum somno: sit sine lite dies.

„Although the words run speedily, the hand is swifter than they; the tongue has not yet, the hand has already, completed its work.“

—  Martial, livro Epigrammata

XIV, 208.
Epigrams (c. 80 – 104 AD)
Original: (la) Currant verba licet, manus est velocior illis;
Nondum lingua suum, dextra peregit opus.

„Life is not living, but living in health.“

—  Martial, livro Epigrammata

VI, 70.
Variant translations:
It is not life to live, but to be well.
Life's not just being alive, but being well.
Epigrams (c. 80 – 104 AD)
Original: (la) Vita non est vivere, sed valera vita est.

„Fortune to many gives too much, enough to none.“

—  Martial, livro Epigrammata

XII, 10.
Epigrams (c. 80 – 104 AD)
Original: (la) Fortuna multis dat nimis, satis nulli.

„Neither fear your death's day nor long for it.“

—  Martial, livro Epigrammata

X, 47. Alternatively translated as "Neither fear, nor wish for, your last day", in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919). Compare: "Nor love thy life, nor hate; but what thou livest / Live well: how long or short permit to heaven", John Milton, Paradise Lost, book xi, line 553.
Epigrams (c. 80 – 104 AD)

„The mode of death is sadder than death itself.“

—  Martial, livro Epigrammata

XI, 91.
Epigrams (c. 80 – 104 AD)

„I do not love thee, Sabidius, nor can I say why; this only I can say, I do not love thee.“

—  Martial, livro Epigrammata

I, 32, reported in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919). Compare: "I do not love thee, Doctor Fell, / The reason why I cannot tell; / But this alone I know full well, / I do not love thee, Doctor Fell", Tom Brown, Laconics.
Epigrams (c. 80 – 104 AD)

„They [the hours] pass by, and are put to our account.“

—  Martial, livro Epigrammata

V, 20, line 13; this phrase is often found as an inscription on sundials.
Epigrams (c. 80 – 104 AD)
Original: (la) Nobis pereunt et imputantur.

„You praise, in three hundred verses, Sabellus, the baths of Ponticus, who gives such excellent dinners. You wish to dine, Sabellus, not to bathe.“

—  Martial, livro Epigrammata

Laudas balnea versibus trecentis
Cenantis bene Pontici, Sabelle.
Vis cenare, Sabelle, non lavari.
IX, 19.
Epigrams (c. 80 – 104 AD)
Original: (la) Laudas balnea versibus trecentis
Cenantis bene Pontici, Sabelle.
Vis cenare, Sabelle, non lavari.

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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