Frases de Sherwood Anderson

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Sherwood Anderson

Data de nascimento: 13. Setembro 1876
Data de falecimento: 8. Março 1941

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Sherwood Anderson foi um escritor norte-americano, principalmente de contos.

Nasceu em Camden, Ohio, o terceiro filho de Erwin M. Anderson e Emma S. Anderson. Depois que os negócios do pai faliram, eles foram forçados a se mudar frequentemente. As dificuldades da família levaram ao pai de Anderson ao alcoolismo, enquanto a mãe morre em 1895. Parcialmente por causa disso, Anderson ficou motivado a fazer bicos , para ajudar a família.

Ele se mudou para Chicago, Illinois perto da casa de seu irmão Clyde. Ele fez trabalhos braçais até a virada do século, quando se alistou no exército e participou na Guerra Hispano-americana em Cuba. Após a guerra, ele trabalhou com seu irmão numa editora em Springfield, Ohio. Anderson estudou na Wittenburg Academy. Eventualmente, ele mantém o emprego de copywriter em Chicago, onde ele foi bem sucedido. Em 1904, ele se casa com Cornelia Lane, filha de uma rica família de Ohio.

Foi pai de 3 filhos e se muda para Cleveland, Ohio onde ele monta um serviço de entregas e uma firma de pintura. Porém, em novembro de 1912, ele "desaparece" voltando 4 dias depois um lapso nervoso. Ele descreve isso como "uma escapada de sua existência material", que gerou elogios de seus colegas escritores, que usaram sua "coragem" como um exemplo. Ele volta para Chicago, trabalhando de novo numa editora e agência de propaganda.

Citações Sherwood Anderson

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„I don’t want to frighten you, but I would like to make you understand the import of what you think of attempting. You must not become a mere peddler of words. The thing to learn is to know what people are thinking about, not what they say.“

— Sherwood Anderson
Context: "You will have to know life," she declared, and her voice trembled with earnestness. She took hold of George Willard’s shoulders and turned him about so that she could look into his eyes. A passer-by might have thought them about to embrace. "If you are to become a writer you’ll have to stop fooling with words," she explained. "It would be better to give up the notion of writing until you are better prepared. Now it’s time to be living. I don’t want to frighten you, but I would like to make you understand the import of what you think of attempting. You must not become a mere peddler of words. The thing to learn is to know what people are thinking about, not what they say." "The Teacher"

„The life of reality is confused, disorderly, almost always without apparent purpose, whereas in the artist's imaginative life there is purpose.“

— Sherwood Anderson
Context: The life of reality is confused, disorderly, almost always without apparent purpose, whereas in the artist's imaginative life there is purpose. There is determination to give the tale, the song, the painting, form — to make it true and real to the theme, not to life. Often the better the job is done, the greater the confusion. I myself remember with what a shock I heard people say that one of my own books Winesburg, Ohio was an exact picture of Ohio village life. The book was written in a crowded tenement district of Chicago. The hint for almost every character was taken from my fellow-lodgers in a large rooming house, many of whom had never lived in a village. The confusion arises out of the fact that others besides practicing artists have imaginations. But most people are afraid to trust their imaginations and the artist is not. Would it not be better to have it understood that realism, in so far as the word means reality to life, is always bad art — although it may possibly be very good journalism? Which is but another way of saying that all of the so-called great realists were not realists at all and never intended being. Madame Bovary did not exist in fact. She existed in the imaginative life of Flaubert and he managed to make her exist also in the imaginative life of his readers. "A Note on Realism" in The Literary Review (25 October 1924)<!-- also in Contemporary American Criticism (1926) -->

„It is apparent that nations cannot exist for us. They are the playthings of children, such toys as children break from boredom and weariness.“

— Sherwood Anderson
Context: We have not approached the time when we may speak to each other, but in the mornings sometimes I have heard, echoing far off, the sound of a trumpet. It is apparent that nations cannot exist for us. They are the playthings of children, such toys as children break from boredom and weariness. The branch of a tree is my country. My freedom sleeps in a mulberry bush. My country is in the shivering legs of a little lost dog. A New Testament (1927)

„The young man's mind was carried away by his growing passion for dreams.“

— Sherwood Anderson
Context: The young man's mind was carried away by his growing passion for dreams. One looking at him would not have thought him particularly sharp. With the recollection of little things occupying his mind he closed his eyes and leaned back in the car seat. He stayed that way for a long time and when he aroused himself and again looked out of the car window the town of Winesburg had disappeared and his life there had become but a background on which to paint the dreams of his manhood. "Departure"

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„Only the few know the sweetness of the twisted apples.“

— Sherwood Anderson, Winesburg, Ohio
Context: On the trees are only a few gnarled apples that the pickers have rejected. They look like the knuckles of Doctor Reefy's hands. One nibbles at them and they are delicious. Into a little round place at the side of the apple has been gathered all of its sweetness. One runs from tree to tree over the frosted ground picking the gnarled, twisted apples and filling his pockets with them. Only the few know the sweetness of the twisted apples. "Paper Pills"

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