Frases de Meša Selimović

Meša Selimović foto
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Meša Selimović

Data de nascimento: 26. Abril 1910
Data de falecimento: 11. Julho 1982
Outros nomes: メシャ・セリモヴィッチ,Меша Селимович,Մեշա Սելիմովիչ

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Meša Selimović foi um escritor sérvio-bósnio.

Meša Selimović licenciou-se em Filosofia pela Universidade de Belgrado. Participou desde 1941, no Comitê Nacional de Libertação. Foi membro da Academia das Artes e das Ciências da Bósnia e Herzegovina e da Sérvia. Recebeu um doutoramento honoris causa pela Universidade de Sarajevo.

Citações Meša Selimović

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„Translated: We are no one's, always at a boundary, always someone’s dowry. Is it a wonder then that we are poor? For centuries now we have been seeking our true selves, yet soon we will not know who we are, we will forget that we ever wanted anything; others do us the honour of calling us under their banner for we have none, they lure us when we are needed and discard us when we have outserved the purpose they gave us. We remain the saddest little district of the world, the most miserable people of the world, losing our own persona and nor being able to take on anyone else's, torn away and not accepted, alien to all and everyone, including those with whom we are most closely related, but who will not recognise us as their kin. We live on a divide between worlds, at the border between nations, always at a fault to someone and first to be struck. Waves of history strike us as a sea cliff. Crude force has worn us out and we made a virtue out of a necessity: we grew smart out of spite.“

— Meša Selimović
So what are we? Fools? Miserable wretches? The most complex people in the world. No one is such a joke of history as we are. Only yesterday we were something that we now wish to forget, yet we have become nothing else. We stopped half way through, flabbergasted. There is no place we can go to any more. We are torn off, but not accepted. As a dead-end branch that streamed away from mother river has neither flow, nor confluence it can rejoin, we are too small to be a lake, too big to be sapped by the earth. With an unclear feeling of shame about our ancestry and guilt about our renegade status, we do not want to look into the past, but there is no future to look into; we therefore try to stop the time, terrified with the prospect of whatever solution might come about. Both our brethren and the newcomers despise us, and we defend ourselves with our pride and our hatred. We wanted to preserve ourselves, and that is exactly how we lost the knowledge of our identity. The greatest misery is that we grew fond of this dead end we are mired in and do not want to abandon it. But everything has a price and so does our love for what we are stuck with.