„That which you weep for is what you really loved.“

—  Marcus Annaeus Lucanus, livro Pharsalia

Book VIII, line 85 (tr. J. D. Duff).
Pharsalia
Original: (la) Quod defles, illud amasti.

„There will be no loyalty between associates in tyranny
and no power will tolerate a partner.“

—  Marcus Annaeus Lucanus, livro Pharsalia

Nulla fides regni sociis, omnisque potestas
inpatiens consortis erit.
Book I, line 92 (tr. Susan H. Braund).
Pharsalia
Original: (la) Nulla fides regni sociis, omnisque potestas<br/>inpatiens consortis erit.

„It was the chain of jealous fate, and the speedy fall which no eminence can escape; it was the grievous collapse of excessive weight, and Rome unable to support her own greatness.“

—  Marcus Annaeus Lucanus, livro Pharsalia

Invida fatorum series summisque negatum
stare diu nimioque graves sub pondere lapsus
nec se Roma ferens.
Book I, line 70 (tr. J. D. Duff).
Pharsalia
Original: (la) Invida fatorum series summisque negatum<br/>stare diu nimioque graves sub pondere lapsus<br/>nec se Roma ferens.

„Make haste; delay is ever fatal to those who are prepared.“

—  Marcus Annaeus Lucanus, livro Pharsalia

Book I, line 281 (tr. J. D. Duff).
Pharsalia
Original: (la) Tolle moras: semper nocuit differre paratis.

„Great things come crashing down upon themselves – such is the limit of growth ordained by heaven for success.“

—  Marcus Annaeus Lucanus, livro Pharsalia

In se magna ruunt: laetis hunc numina rebus
crescendi posuere modum.
Book I, line 81 (tr. J. D. Duff).
Pharsalia
Original: (la) In se magna ruunt: laetis hunc numina rebus<br/>crescendi posuere modum.

„If a man would be righteous, let him depart from a court. Virtue is incompatible with absolute power. He who is ashamed to commit cruelty must always fear it.“

—  Marcus Annaeus Lucanus, livro Pharsalia

Book VIII, line 493 (tr. J. D. Duff).
Pharsalia
Original: (la) Exeat aula
qui volt esse pius. Virtus et summa potestas
non coeunt; semper metuet quem saeva pudebunt.

„But many are driven to utmost peril by the mere dread of coming danger. He is truly brave, who is both quick to endure the ordeal, if it be close and pressing, and willing also to let it wait.“

—  Marcus Annaeus Lucanus, livro Pharsalia

Multos in summa pericula misit
venturi timor ipse mali. Fortissimus ille est
qui, promptus metuenda pati, si comminus instent,
et differre potest.
Book VII, line 104 (tr. J. D. Duff).
Pharsalia
Original: (la) Multos in summa pericula misit<br/>venturi timor ipse mali. Fortissimus ille est
qui, promptus metuenda pati, si comminus instent,
et differre potest.

„The very ruins have been destroyed.“

—  Marcus Annaeus Lucanus, livro Pharsalia

Book IX, line 969 (tr. J. D. Duff).
Pharsalia
Original: (la) Etiam periere ruinae.

„One stroke of sword and all the world is yours.
Make plain to all men that the crowds who decked
Pompeius' hundred pageants scarce were fit
For one poor triumph.“

—  Marcus Annaeus Lucanus, livro Pharsalia

Book VII, line 278 (tr. E. Ridley).
Pharsalia
Original: (la) Et primo ferri motu prosternite mundum;
sitque palam, quas tot duxit Pompeius in urbem
curribus, unius gentes non esse triumphi.

„Behold the true father of his country.“

—  Marcus Annaeus Lucanus, livro Pharsalia

Book IX, line 601 (tr. J. D. Duff).
Pharsalia
Original: (la) Ecce parens verus patriae.

„The Bards also, who by the praises of their verse transmit to distant ages the fame of heroes slain in battle, poured forth at ease their lays in abundance.“

—  Marcus Annaeus Lucanus, livro Pharsalia

Book I, line 447 (tr. J. D. Duff).
Pharsalia
Original: (la) Vos quoque qui fortes animas, belloque peremptas
Laudibus in longum vates dimittitis aevum,
Plurima securi fudistis carmina, Bardi.

„Men are ignorant that the purpose of the sword is to save every man from slavery.“

—  Marcus Annaeus Lucanus, livro Pharsalia

Book IV, line 579 (tr. J. D. Duff).
E. Ridley's translation:
: The sword was given for this, that none need live a slave.
Pharsalia
Original: (la) Ignorantque datos, ne quisquam seruiat, enses.

„Poverty was scorned,
Fruitful of warriors; and from all the world
Came that which ruins nations.“

—  Marcus Annaeus Lucanus, livro Pharsalia

Book I, line 165 (tr. Edward Ridley).
Pharsalia
Original: (la) Fecunda virorum
paupertas fugitur totoque accersitur orbe
quo gens quaeque perit.

„[She] is not permitted to reveal as much as she is suffered to know.“

—  Marcus Annaeus Lucanus, livro Pharsalia

Book V, line 176 (tr. J. D. Duff).
Pharsalia
Original: (la) Nec tantum prodere vati
quantum scire licet.

„So true it is that love of money alone is incapable of dreading death by the sword.“

—  Marcus Annaeus Lucanus, livro Pharsalia

Book III, line 118 (tr. J. D. Duff).
Pharsalia
Original: (la) Usque adeo solus ferrum mortemque timere
auri nescit amor.

„You have taken from me the one privilege of civil war – the power of granting life to the defeated.“

—  Marcus Annaeus Lucanus, livro Pharsalia

Book IX, line 1066 (tr. J. D. Duff).
Pharsalia
Original: (la) Unica belli
praemia civilis, victis donare salutem,
perdidimus.

„Serpents, thirst, burning-sand – all are welcomed by the brave; endurance finds pleasure in hardship; virtue rejoices when it pays dear for its existence.“

—  Marcus Annaeus Lucanus, livro Pharsalia

Book IX, line 402 (tr. J. D. Duff).
Pharsalia
Original: (la) Serpens, sitis, ardor harenae
dulcia virtuti; gaudet patientia duris;
laetius est, quotiens magno sibi constat, honestum.

„The dead are free from Fortune; Mother Earth has room for all her children, and he who lacks an urn has the sky to cover him.“

—  Marcus Annaeus Lucanus, livro Pharsalia

Book VII, line 818 (tr. J. D. Duff).
Pharsalia
Original: (la) Libera fortunae mors est; capit omnia tellus
quae genuit; caelo tegitur qui non habet urnam.

„More was lost there than mere life and existence: we were overthrown for all time to come.“

—  Marcus Annaeus Lucanus, livro Pharsalia

Book VII, line 639 (tr. J. D. Duff).
Pharsalia
Original: (la) Plus est quam vita salusque
quod perit: in totum mundi prosternimur aevum.

„Might became the standard of right.“

—  Marcus Annaeus Lucanus, livro Pharsalia

Book I, line 175 (tr. J. D. Duff).
Pharsalia
Original: (la) Mensuraque juris
vis erat.

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