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John David Barrow

Data de nascimento: 29. Novembro 1952
Outros nomes: John Barrow

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John David Barrow FRS é um cosmólogo, físico e matemático inglês. É atualmente professor pesquisador de ciências matemáticas da Universidade de Cambridge. Barrow é também um popular escritor de ciências e dramaturgo amador.

Citações John David Barrow

„While we have no reason to expect that our position in the universe is special in every way, we would be equally misled were we to assume that it could not be special in any way.“

—  John D. Barrow
The Book of Universes: Exploring the Limits of the Cosmos (2011), Context: While we have no reason to expect that our position in the universe is special in every way, we would be equally misled were we to assume that it could not be special in any way.<!--ch. 2, p. 22

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„The laws of Nature are based upon the existence of a pattern,“

—  John D. Barrow
The Artful Universe (1995), Context: The laws of Nature are based upon the existence of a pattern, linking one state of affairs to another; and where there is pattern, there is symmetry. Yet... the symmetries that the laws enshrine are broken in... outcomes. Suppose that we balance a needle on its point and then release it. The law of gravity, which governs its subsequent motion, is perfectly democratic. It has no preference for any particular direction in the Universe: it is symmetrical in this respect. Yet, when the needle falls, it must fall in a particular direction. The directional symmetry of the underlying law is broken, therefore... By the same token, the fallen needle hides the symmetry of the law... Such 'symmetry-breaking' governs much of what we see in the Universe... It allows a Universe governed by a small number of symmetrical laws to manifest an infinite diversity of complex, asymmetrical states. This is how the Universe can be at once, simple and complicated.<!-- Ch. 2, pp. 36-37

„Medieval students… believed all forms of harmony to derive from a common source“

—  John D. Barrow
The Artful Universe (1995), Context: Ancient belief in a cosmos composed of spheres, producing music as angels guided them through the heavens, was still fluorishing in Elizabethan times.... There is a good deal more to Pythagorean musical theory than celestial harmony. Besides the music of the celestial spheres (musica mundana), two other varieties of music were distinguished: the sound of instruments...(musica instrumentalis), and the continuous unheard music that emanated from the human body (musica humana), which arises from a resonance between the body and the soul.... In the medieval world, the status of music is revealed by its position within the Quadrivium—the fourfold curriculum—alongside arithmetic, geometry, and astronomy. Medieval students... believed all forms of harmony to derive from a common source. Before Boethius' studies in the ninth century, the idea of musical harmony was not considered independently of wider matters of celestial or ethical harmony.<!-- Ch. 5, pp. 201-202

„Parmenides' influential arguments against the concept of empty space“

—  John D. Barrow
The Book of Nothing (2009), Context: The Greek tradition was a complete contrast to that of the Far East.... the Greeks placed logic at the pinnacle of human thinking. Their sceptical attitude towards the wielding of 'non-being' as some sort of 'something' that could be subject to logical development was exemplified by Parmenides' influential arguments against the concept of empty space.... He maintained that you can only speak about what is: what is not cannot be thought of, and what cannot be thought of cannot be.... more unexpected was the further conclusion that time, motion nor change could exist either. chapter one "Zero—The Whole Story"<!-- p. 40-->

„The quantum revolution showed us why the old picture of a vacuum as an empty box was untenable.“

—  John D. Barrow
The Book of Nothing (2009), ...Gradually, this exotic new picture of quantum nothingness succumbed to experimental exploration... in the form of vacuum tubes, light bulbs and X-rays. Now the 'empty' space itself started to be probed. ...There was always something left: a vacuum energy that permeated every fibre of the Universe. chapter nought "Nothingology—Flying to Nowhere"

„Scientific pictures are often not just about science.“

—  John D. Barrow
Cosmic Imagery: Key Images in the History of Science (2008), Context: Scientific pictures are often not just about science. They may... have an undeniable aesthetic quality. They may even have been primarily works of art that possess a scientific message. Introduction

„Aristotle believed that the world did not come into being at some time in the past; it had always existed and it would always exist, unchanged in essence for ever. He placed a high premium on symmetry“

—  John D. Barrow
The Book of Universes: Exploring the Limits of the Cosmos (2011), Context: Aristotle believed that the world did not come into being at some time in the past; it had always existed and it would always exist, unchanged in essence for ever. He placed a high premium on symmetry and believed that the sphere was the most perfect of all shapes. Hence the universe must be spherical.... An important feature of the spherical shape... was the fact that when a sphere rotates it does not cut into empty space where there is no matter and it leaves no empty space behind.... A vacuum was impossible. It could no more exist than an infinite physical quantity.... Circular motion was the most perfect and natural movement of all.<!--ch. 1, pp. 12-13

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„We are products of a past world where sensitivities to certain things were a matter of life or death.“

—  John D. Barrow
The Artful Universe (1995), Context: The Universe has imposed aspects of its structure upon us by the inevitability of the forces of Nature... In a world where adapters succeed, but non-adapters fail, one expects to find vestigial remnants... Many of these adaptations... give rise to a suite of curious byproducts, some of which have played a role in determining our aesthetic sense. We are products of a past world where sensitivities to certain things were a matter of life or death.<!-- Ch. 6, p.246

„Where there is life there is a pattern, and where there is a pattern there is mathematics.“

—  John D. Barrow
The Artful Universe (1995), Context: Where there is life there is a pattern, and where there is a pattern there is mathematics. Once that germ of rationality and order exists to turn a chaos into a cosmos, then so does mathematics. There could not be a non-mathematical Universe containing living observers.<!-- Ch. 5, p. 230

„There is a good deal more to Pythagorean musical theory than celestial harmony.“

—  John D. Barrow
The Artful Universe (1995), Context: Ancient belief in a cosmos composed of spheres, producing music as angels guided them through the heavens, was still fluorishing in Elizabethan times.... There is a good deal more to Pythagorean musical theory than celestial harmony. Besides the music of the celestial spheres (musica mundana), two other varieties of music were distinguished: the sound of instruments...(musica instrumentalis), and the continuous unheard music that emanated from the human body (musica humana), which arises from a resonance between the body and the soul.... In the medieval world, the status of music is revealed by its position within the Quadrivium—the fourfold curriculum—alongside arithmetic, geometry, and astronomy. Medieval students... believed all forms of harmony to derive from a common source. Before Boethius' studies in the ninth century, the idea of musical harmony was not considered independently of wider matters of celestial or ethical harmony.<!-- Ch. 5, pp. 201-202

„There was always something left: a vacuum energy that permeated every fibre of the Universe.“

—  John D. Barrow
The Book of Nothing (2009), Context: The quantum revolution showed us why the old picture of a vacuum as an empty box was untenable.... Gradually, this exotic new picture of quantum nothingness succumbed to experimental exploration... in the form of vacuum tubes, light bulbs and X-rays. Now the 'empty' space itself started to be probed.... There was always something left: a vacuum energy that permeated every fibre of the Universe. chapter nought "Nothingology—Flying to Nowhere"<!-- p. 10-->

„This may be the low-impact evolutionary path you need to follow in order to survive into the far, far future.“

—  John D. Barrow
The Book of Universes: Exploring the Limits of the Cosmos (2011), Context: Continual miniaturisation allows resources to be conserved, efficiency to be increased, pollution to be reduced, and the remarkable flexibilities of the quantum world to be tapped. Very advanced civilizations elsewhere in the universe may have been force to follow the same technological path. Their nano-scale space probes, their atomic-scale machines and nano-computers, would be imperceptible to our course-grained surveys of the universe.... This may be the low-impact evolutionary path you need to follow in order to survive into the far, far future.<!--ch. 2, pp. 23-24

„The living world is not a marble palace.“

—  John D. Barrow
New Theories of Everything (2007), Context: The living world is not a marble palace. It is a higgledy-piggledy outcome of natural selection and the competition between many interacting factors. The outcome is often neither elegant nor symmetrical.<!--Ch. 2, p. 18

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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