Frases de John A. Hobson

0   0

John A. Hobson

Data de nascimento: 6. Julho 1858
Data de falecimento: 1. Abril 1940

Publicidade

John Atkinson Hobson foi um economista inglês, crítico do Imperialismo. É um dos principais representantes do reformismo burguês. Deixou uma obra de mais de 30 volumes, dos quais os mais importantes são, A Evolução do Capitalismo Moderno, e o Imperialismo. Embora seja habitualmente considerado um marxista fabiano, Hobson sofreu influência de diversas correntes de pensamento, de Marx a Sombart e Veblen. Seu caráter profundamente herético fez com que sua obra, por sua vez, influenciasse autores tão pouco semelhantes como Lenin e Keynes.

Hobson é um precursor de Schumpeter e Keynes na demonstração de que o crédito, e não a poupança, é a mola financeira da acumulação capitalista. Para ele o excesso de poupança acarreta subconsumo e superprodução.

Autores parecidos

Citações John A. Hobson

„If the interests of consumers and the interests of producers weighed equally in the eyes of governments“

—  J.A. Hobson
The Morals of Economic Irrationalism (1920), Context: If the interests of consumers and the interests of producers weighed equally in the eyes of governments, as they should, the strongest of all obstacles to a peaceful harmonious society of nations would be overcome. For the suspicions, jealousies, and hostilities of nations are inspired more by the tendency of groups of producers to misrepresent their private interests as the good of their respective countries than by any other single circumstance.<!--p.14

„Industrial progress would undoubtedly be slower under state-control, because the very object of such control is to divert a larger proportion of human genius and effort from these occupations in order to apply them in producing higher forms of wealth.“

—  J.A. Hobson
The Evolution of Modern Capitalism: A Study of Machine Production (1906), Ch. XVII Civilisation and Industrial Development, Context: Industrial progress would undoubtedly be slower under state-control, because the very object of such control is to divert a larger proportion of human genius and effort from these occupations in order to apply them in producing higher forms of wealth. It is not, however, right to assume that progress in the industrial arts would cease under state-industry; such progress would be slower, and would itself partake of a routine character—a slow, continuous adjustment of the mechanism of production and distribution to the slowly-changing needs of the community.<!--section 11, p. 422

Publicidade

„Perhaps the worst of the three fallacies, and in a sense the deepest-rooted, is the concept of export trade as of more value than import trade.“

—  J.A. Hobson
The Morals of Economic Irrationalism (1920), Context: Perhaps the worst of the three fallacies, and in a sense the deepest-rooted, is the concept of export trade as of more value than import trade.<!--p.12

„We now stand face to face with the main objection so often raised against all endeavours to remedy industrial and social diseases by the expansion of public control. …The strife, danger, and waste of industrial competition are necessary conditions to industrial vitality.“

—  J.A. Hobson
The Evolution of Modern Capitalism: A Study of Machine Production (1906), Ch. XVII Civilisation and Industrial Development, Context: We now stand face to face with the main objection so often raised against all endeavours to remedy industrial and social diseases by the expansion of public control.... The strife, danger, and waste of industrial competition are necessary conditions to industrial vitality.<!--section 11, p. 417

„On what a slippery slope …international morality reposes.“

—  J.A. Hobson
The Morals of Economic Irrationalism (1920), Context: On what a slippery slope... international morality reposes.<!--pp.6-7

„The world market is indefinitely expansible and is always expanding“

—  J.A. Hobson
The Morals of Economic Irrationalism (1920), Context: It is untrue that the world market is strictly limited, with the consequence that every advance of one group of traders is at the expense of another group. The world market is indefinitely expansible and is always expanding...<!--p.11

„The richly nourished patriotism of war breeds divisions and antagonisms which are easily exploited afterwards by political, racial, religious, and cultural passions, but most of all by economic interests.“

—  J.A. Hobson
The Morals of Economic Irrationalism (1920), Context: The richly nourished patriotism of war breeds divisions and antagonisms which are easily exploited afterwards by political, racial, religious, and cultural passions, but most of all by economic interests.<!--p.51

„Under socialized industry progress in the industrial arts would be slower and would absorb a smaller proportion of individual interest, in order that progress in the finer intellectual and moral arts might be faster, and might engage a larger share of life.“

—  J.A. Hobson
The Evolution of Modern Capitalism: A Study of Machine Production (1906), Ch. XVII Civilisation and Industrial Development, Context: Under socialized industry progress in the industrial arts would be slower and would absorb a smaller proportion of individual interest, in order that progress in the finer intellectual and moral arts might be faster, and might engage a larger share of life.<!--section 11, p. 421

„In proportion as a community comes to substitute a qualitative for a quantitative standard of living, it escapes the limitations imposed by matter upon man. Art knows no restrictions of space or size, and in proportion as we attain the art of living we shall be likewise free.“

—  J.A. Hobson
The Evolution of Modern Capitalism: A Study of Machine Production (1906), Ch. XVII Civilisation and Industrial Development, Context: The case is a simple one. A mere increase in the variety of our material consumption relieves the strain imposed upon man by the limits of the material universe, for such variety enables him to utilise a larger proportion of the aggregate of matter. But in proportion as we add to mere variety a higher appreciation of those adaptations of matter which are due to human skill, and which we call Art, we pass outside the limits of matter and are no longer the slaves of roods and acres and a law of diminishing returns. So long as we continue to raise more men who demand more food and clothes and fuel, we are subject to the limitations of the material universe, and what we get ever costs us more and benefits us less. But when we cease to demand more, and begin to demand better, commodities, more delicate, highly finished and harmonious, we can increase the enjoyment without adding to the cost or exhausting the store. What artist would not laugh at the suggestion that the materials of his art, his colours, clay, marble, or what else he wrought in, might fail and his art come to an end? When we are dealing with qualitative, i. e. artistic, goods, we see at once how an infinite expenditure of labour may be given, an infinite satisfaction taken, from the meagrest quantity of matter and space. In proportion as a community comes to substitute a qualitative for a quantitative standard of living, it escapes the limitations imposed by matter upon man. Art knows no restrictions of space or size, and in proportion as we attain the art of living we shall be likewise free. <!--section 16, p. 431

Help us translate English quotes

Discover interesting quotes and translate them.

Start translating

„History does not show greed of gain as the motive of the great steps in industrial progress.“

—  J.A. Hobson
The Evolution of Modern Capitalism: A Study of Machine Production (1906), Ch. XVII Civilisation and Industrial Development, Context: History does not show greed of gain as the motive of the great steps in industrial progress. The love of science, the pure delight of mechanical invention, the attainment of some slight personal convenience in labour, and mere chance, play the largest part in the history of industrial improvements. These motives would be as equally operative under state-control as under private enterprise.<!--section 11, p. 419

„Corporations are in a sense moral monsters; we say they behave as such and we are disposed to treat them as such. The standard of international morality, particularly in matters of commercial intercourse, is on a still lower level.“

—  J.A. Hobson
The Morals of Economic Irrationalism (1920), Context: Corporations are in a sense moral monsters; we say they behave as such and we are disposed to treat them as such. The standard of international morality, particularly in matters of commercial intercourse, is on a still lower level. <!--p.3

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“