Frases de James Branch Cabell

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James Branch Cabell

Data de nascimento: 14. Abril 1879
Data de falecimento: 5. Maio 1958

James Branch Cabell foi um escritor de ficção científica estadunidense.

Obras

The Cream of the Jest
James Branch Cabell

Citações James Branch Cabell

„Um livro, uma vez que é impresso e publicado, torna-se uma individualidade. É por sua publicação como decisivamente é separado de seu autor como em parto criança é separada de seus pais. O livro "significa" depois, necessariamente, — tanto gramaticalmente e efetivamente, — independentemente de qualquer significado desse ou daquele leitor.“

—  James Branch Cabell
A book, once it is printed and published, becomes individual. It is by its publication as decisively severed from its author as in parturition a child is cut off from its parent. The book "means" thereafter, perforce, — both grammatically and actually, — whatever meaning this or that reader gets out of it. "A Note on Cabellian Harmonics" in Cabellian Harmonics (April 1928)

„O otimista proclama que vivemos no melhor de todos possíveis mundos; e o pessimista teme que isto seja verdadeiro.“

—  James Branch Cabell
The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all possible worlds; and the pessimist fears this is true. The Silver Stallion (1926)

„As pessoas se casam por uma série de outras razões e com resultados variáveis. Mas se casar por amor é atrair uma inevitável tragédia.“

—  James Branch Cabell, livro The Cream of the Jest
People marry through a variety of other reasons, and with varying results : but to marry for love is to invite inevitable tragedy. "The Cream of the Jest"; Por James Branch Cabell, Harold Ward; Colaborador Harold Ward; Publicado por Kessinger Publishing, 2005; ISBN 0766194892, 9780766194892; 264 páginas; http://books.google.com.br/books?id=0GdVNipGRxYC&pg=PA235&dq=People+marry+for+a+variety+of+reasons+and+with+varying+results.+But+to+marry+for+love+is+to+invite+inevitable+tragedy. - Página 235

„A crítica, qualquer que seja sua pretensão, nunca faz mais que definir a impressão que é feita sobre ele num certo momento por um trabalho em que o escritor que anotou suas impressões do mundo que ele percebeu numa certa hora.“

—  James Branch Cabell
Criticism, whatever may be its pretensions, never does more than to define the impression which is made upon it at a certain moment by a work wherein the writer himself noted the impression of the world which he received at a certain hour. Epígrafe de "The Certain Hour" (1916)

„The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all possible worlds; and the pessimist fears this is true. So I elect for neither label.“

—  James Branch Cabell, The Silver Stallion
The Silver Stallion (1926), Context: Yet creeds mean very little... The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all possible worlds; and the pessimist fears this is true. So I elect for neither label. Coth, in Book Four : Coth at Porutsa, Ch. XXVI : The Realist in Defeat

„The Wardens without fail arrange what we call — gravely, too — "some natural explanation."“

—  James Branch Cabell, livro The Cream of the Jest
The Cream of the Jest (1917), Context: The Wardens of Earth sometimes unbar strange windows, I suspect — windows which face on other worlds than ours: and They permit this-or-that man to peer out fleetingly, perhaps, just for the joke's sake; since always They humorously contrive matters so this man shall never be able to convince his fellows of what he has seen or of the fact that he was granted any peep at all. The Wardens without fail arrange what we call — gravely, too — "some natural explanation." Ch. 40 : Which Mr. Flaherty Does Not Quite Explain

„I fight against the gluttony of time with so many very amusing weapons — with gestures and with three attitudes and with charming phrases; with tears and with tinsel, and with sugar-coated pills, and with platitudes slightly regilded.“

—  James Branch Cabell
The Way of Ecben (1929), Context: I fight against the gluttony of time with so many very amusing weapons — with gestures and with three attitudes and with charming phrases; with tears and with tinsel, and with sugar-coated pills, and with platitudes slightly regilded. Yes, and I fight him also with little mirrors wherein gleam confusedly the corruptions of lust, and ruddy loyalty, and a bit of moonshine, and the pure diamond of the heart's desire, and the opal cloudings of human compromise: but, above all, I fight that ravening dotard with the strength of my own folly. Horvendile, in Ch. 13 : What a Boy Thought

„Who. you ask, is this fellow? — What matter names?
He is only a scribbler who is content.“

—  James Branch Cabell
The Certain Hour (1916), Context: Thus he labors, and loudly they jeer at him; — That is, when they remember he still exists. Who. you ask, is this fellow? — What matter names? He is only a scribbler who is content. "Auctorial Induction"

„So Florimel extinguished the candle, with a good-will that delighted Jurgen.“

—  James Branch Cabell
Jurgen (1919), Context: Let us extinguish this candle says Jurgen, "for I have seen so many flames to-day that my eyes are tired." So Florimel extinguished the candle, with a good-will that delighted Jurgen. And now they were in utter darkness, and in the dark nobody can see what is happening. But that Florimel now trusted Jurgen and his Noumarian claims was evinced by her very first remark. "I was in the beginning suspicious of your majesty," said Florimel, "because I had always heard that every emperor carried a magnificent sceptre, and you then displayed nothing of the sort. But now, somehow, I do not doubt you any longer. And of what is your majesty thinking?" "Why, I was reflecting, my dear," says Jurgen, "that my father imagines things very satisfactorily." Ch. 37 : Invention of the Lovely Vampire

„He had a quiet way with the girls, and with the men a way of solemn, blinking simplicity which caused the more hasty in judgment to consider him a fool.“

—  James Branch Cabell, livro Figures of Earth
Figures of Earth (1921), Context: He had a quiet way with the girls, and with the men a way of solemn, blinking simplicity which caused the more hasty in judgment to consider him a fool. Then, too, young Manuel was very often detected smiling sleepily over nothing, and his gravest care in life appeared to be that figure which Manuel had made out of marsh clay from the pool of Haranton. This figure he was continually reshaping and realtering. The figure stood upon the margin of the pool; and near by were two stones overgrown with moss, and supporting a cross of old worm-eaten wood, which commemorated what had been done there. Ch. I : How Manuel Left the Mire

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„I had thought the transformation surprising enough when King Ferdinand was turned into a saint, but this tops all!“

—  James Branch Cabell, livro Figures of Earth
Figures of Earth (1921), Context: The magician looked at the tall warrior for a while, and in the dark soft eyes of Miramon Lluagor was a queer sort of compassion. Miramon said, "Yes, Manuel, these portents have marked your living thus far, just as they formerly distinguished the beginnings of Mithras and of Huitzilopochtli and of Tammouz and of Heracles—" "Yes, but what does it matter if these accidents did happen to me, Miramon?" "— As they happened to Gautama and to Dionysos and to Krishna and to all other reputable Redeemers," Miramon continued. "Well, well, all this is granted. But what, pray, am I to deduce from all this?" Miramon told him. Dom Manuel, at the end of Miramon's speaking, looked peculiarly solemn, and Manuel said: "I had thought the transformation surprising enough when King Ferdinand was turned into a saint, but this tops all! Either way, Miramon, you point out an obligation so tremendous that the less said about it, the wiser; and the sooner this obligation is discharged and the ritual fulfilled, the more comfortable it will be for everybody." Ch. XXXII : The Redemption of Poictesme

„To-day alone was real. Never was man brought into contact with reality save through the evanescent emotions and sensations of that single moment, that infinitesimal fraction of a second, which was passing now — and it was in the insignificance of this moment, precisely, that religious persons must believe.“

—  James Branch Cabell, livro The Cream of the Jest
The Cream of the Jest (1917), Context: To-day alone was real. Never was man brought into contact with reality save through the evanescent emotions and sensations of that single moment, that infinitesimal fraction of a second, which was passing now — and it was in the insignificance of this moment, precisely, that religious persons must believe. So ran the teachings of all dead and lingering faiths alike. Here was, perhaps, only another instance of mankind's abhorrence of actualities; and man's quaint dislike of facing reality was here disguised as a high moral principle. That was why all art, which strove to make the sensations of a moment soul-satisfying, was dimly felt to be irreligious. For art performed what religion only promised. Ch. 26 : "Epper Si Muove"

„The transfiguring touch was to come, it seemed from a girl's lips; but it had not; he kissed, and life remained uncharmed.“

—  James Branch Cabell, livro The Cream of the Jest
The Cream of the Jest (1917), Context: The transfiguring touch was to come, it seemed from a girl's lips; but it had not; he kissed, and life remained uncharmed.... at the bottom of his heart, he was still expecting the transfiguring touch to come, some day, from something he was to obtain or do, perhaps to-morrow.... Then he had by accident found out the sigil's power... Ch. 27 : Evolution of a Vestryman

„Powerless Atoms of Eternity
Why should we hope to know of Something higher?“

—  James Branch Cabell
Context: Nay, 'tis not fitting that we should require Within this World but Raiment, Food and Fire; Powerless Atoms of Eternity Why should we hope to know of Something higher? This Knowledge could but add, not lessen. Woe; The Magian who To-day forms fire with snow Shares with the Sudra in Infinity. We come from Nothing and to Nothing go. So best consent, although with forced grace, Upon this dingy Ball to run our race Untrammeled with the thoughts of higher things, Until we reach the shadowy Stopping place. Quotes from "The Blind Desire", using the pseudonym "Charles A. Ballance" in William and Mary College Monthly (September 1897), V, p. 51

„I quite fixedly believe the Wardens of Earth sometimes unbar strange windows, that face on other worlds than ours.“

—  James Branch Cabell, livro The Cream of the Jest
The Cream of the Jest (1917), Context: I quite fixedly believe the Wardens of Earth sometimes unbar strange windows, that face on other worlds than ours. And some of us, I think, once in a while get a peep through these windows. But we are not permitted to get a long peep, or an unobstructed peep, nor very certainly, are we permitted to see all there is — out yonder. The fatal fault, sir, of your theorizing is that it is too complete. It aims to throw light upon the universe, and therefore is self-evidently moonshine. The Wardens of Earth do not desire that we should understand the universe, Mr. Kennaston; it is part of Their appointed task to insure that we never do; and because of Their efficiency every notion that any man, dead, living, or unborn, might form as to the universe will necessarily prove wrong. Ch 28 : The Shallowest Sort of Mysticism

„James Branch Cabell made this book so that he who wills may read the story of mans eternally unsatisfied hunger in search of beauty.“

—  James Branch Cabell, livro The Cream of the Jest
The Cream of the Jest (1917), Context: James Branch Cabell made this book so that he who wills may read the story of mans eternally unsatisfied hunger in search of beauty. Ettarre stays inaccessible always and her lovliness is his to look on only in his dreams. All men she must evade at the last and many ar the ways of her elusion. Afterpiece : a hidden inscription on the Sigil of Scoteia (and so spelled, in a peculiar modification of Roman capital letters)

„Yes, there was Edgar, whom I starved and hunted until I was tired of it: then I chased him up a back alley one night, and knocked out those annoying brains of his. And there was Walt, whom I chivvied and battered from place to place, and made a paralytic of him: and him, too, I labelled offensive and lewd and lascivious and indecent. Then later there was Mark, whom I frightened into disguising himself in a clown's suit, so that nobody might suspect him to be a maker of literature: indeed, I frightened him so that he hid away the greater part of what he had made until after he was dead, and I could not get at him. That was a disgusting trick to play on me, I consider.“

—  James Branch Cabell
The Judging of Jurgen (1920), Context: In Philistia to make literature and to make trouble for yourself are synonyms,… the tumblebug explained. — I know, for already we of Philistia have been pestered by three of these makers of literature. Yes, there was Edgar, whom I starved and hunted until I was tired of it: then I chased him up a back alley one night, and knocked out those annoying brains of his. And there was Walt, whom I chivvied and battered from place to place, and made a paralytic of him: and him, too, I labelled offensive and lewd and lascivious and indecent. Then later there was Mark, whom I frightened into disguising himself in a clown's suit, so that nobody might suspect him to be a maker of literature: indeed, I frightened him so that he hid away the greater part of what he had made until after he was dead, and I could not get at him. That was a disgusting trick to play on me, I consider. Still, these are the only three detected makers of literature that have ever infested Philistia, thanks be to goodness and my vigilance, but for both of which we might have been no more free from makers of literature than are the other countries.…

„I am Manuel. I have lived in the loneliness which is common to all men, but the difference is that I have known it.“

—  James Branch Cabell, livro Figures of Earth
Figures of Earth (1921), Context: I am Manuel. I have lived in the loneliness which is common to all men, but the difference is that I have known it. Now it is necessary for me, as it is necessary for all men, to die in this same loneliness, and I know that there is no help for it. Manuel, in Ch. XXXIX : The Passing of Manuel

„I agree with Freydis that, for various reasons, nobody ever, quite, knew Manuel well.
The hero of "The Silver Stallion" is, thus, no person, but an idea“

—  James Branch Cabell
The Silver Stallion (1926), Context: I agree with Freydis that, for various reasons, nobody ever, quite, knew Manuel well. The hero of "The Silver Stallion" is, thus, no person, but an idea, — an idea presented at the moment of its conception... I mean, of course, the idea that Manuel, who was yesterday the physical Redeemer of Poictesme, will by and by return as his people's spiritual Redeemer. Author's Note

„I do not seek to copy nature. I, on the contrary, create to divert me such faith and dreams as living among men would tend to destroy.“

—  James Branch Cabell
The Silver Stallion (1926), Context: I do not seek to copy nature. I, on the contrary, create to divert me such faith and dreams as living among men would tend to destroy. But as it is, my worshipers depart from me heartedly, in this grey corridor, and they are devoid of fear and parvanimity; for the effect of my singing, like that of all great singing, is to fill my hearers with a sentiment of their importance as moral beings and the greatness of their destinies. The Gander, in Book Seven : What Saraïde Wanted, Ch. XLV : The Gander Also Generalizes

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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