Frases de Helmuth von Moltke

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Helmuth von Moltke

Data de nascimento: 26. Outubro 1800
Data de falecimento: 24. Abril 1891
Outros nomes:Helmuth von Moltke star,Helmuth Graf von Moltke

Publicidade

Helmuth Karl Bernhard, Graf von Moltke , foi um marechal-de-campo prussiano, liderava uma numerosa divisão do Exército prussiano na Unificação Alemã e na Guerra Franco-Prussiana. Estudou na Academia Militar de Copenhague.

Inicialmente, alistou-se no Exército Dinamarquês, mas em 1822 alistou-se no Exército Prussiano, como tenente. Entrou para o Estado-Maior do exército Prussiano em 1835 e em 1835, foi enviado à Turquia para ajudar na modernização do exército daquele país. Retornou à Prússia em 1839, como chefe do Estado-Maior do IV Corpo. Comandou as operações na Guerra dos Ducados , contra a Dinamarca, na Guerra das Sete Semanas , contra a Áustria e na Guerra Franco-Prussiana , quando do surgimento do Segundo Reich.

Publicou vários livros de temática militar, onde explicava suas táticas de guerra.

Citações Helmuth von Moltke

„The tactical result of an engagement forms the base for new strategic decisions because victory or defeat in a battle changes the situation to such a degree that no human acumen is able to see beyond the first battle.“

— Helmuth von Moltke the Elder
Context: The tactical result of an engagement forms the base for new strategic decisions because victory or defeat in a battle changes the situation to such a degree that no human acumen is able to see beyond the first battle. In this sense one should understand Napoleon's saying: "I have never had a plan of operations." Therefore no plan of operations extends with any certainty beyond the first contact with the main hostile force. Kein Operationsplan reicht mit einiger Sicherheit über das erste Zusammentreffen mit der feindlichen Hauptmacht hinaus. "On Strategy" (1871)/"Über Strategie" (1871), as translated in Moltke on the Art of War: Selected Writings (1993) by Daniel J. Hughes and Harry Bell, p. 92; German collected in: Kriegsgeschichtliche Einzelschriften, H.13 (1890), hier zitiert nach: Militārische Werke, Band 2, Teil 2. Mittler & Sohn Berlin 1900. [https://books.google.de/books?id=WHgvafaY1UIC&pg=PA291 S. 291 books.google] Paraphrased variants: No plan survives contact with the enemy. Paraphrased in The Swordbearers : Studies in Supreme Command in the First World War (1963) by Correlli Barnett, p. 35 No battle plan ever survives contact with the enemy. As quoted in Donnybrook : The Battle of Bull Run, 1861 (2005) by David Detzer, p. 233

„Strategy is a system of expedients; it is more than a mere scholarly discipline.“

— Helmuth von Moltke the Elder
Context: Strategy is a system of expedients; it is more than a mere scholarly discipline. It is the translation of knowledge to practical life, the improvement of the original leading thought in accordance with continually changing situations. "On Strategy" (1871), as translated in Moltke on the Art of War: Selected Writings (1993) by Daniel J. Hughes and Harry Bell, p. 124 Variants: War is a matter of expedients. As quoted in "Nothing Went According To Plan" by Jim Lacey in TIME magazine (15 April 2003) If in war, from the beginning of the operations, everything is uncertain except such will and energy as the commander carries in himself, there cannot possibly be practical value for strategy in general principles, rules derived from them and systems built up upon the rules. … Strategy is a system of expedients. It is more than science, it is the translation of science into practical life, the development of an original leading thought in accordance with the ever-changing circumstances. As quoted in Government and the War (1918) by Spenser Wilkinson As quoted in Prussia : The Perversion of an Idea (1994) by Giles MacDonogh, p. 166 The wordplay with wägen and wagen, weigh and venture ("ehe wäg's dann wag's") is much older than Moltke -->