Frases de Czesław Miłosz

Czesław Miłosz photo
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Czesław Miłosz

Data de nascimento: 30. Junho 1911
Data de falecimento: 14. Agosto 2004
Outros nomes:چسلاو میلوش, Milosh Cheslav, 米禾舒

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Czesław Miłosz foi um poeta, romancista e ensaista de língua polonêsa.

Milosz nasceu em família de ascendência polonêsa na Lituânia, quando o país ainda pertencia ao Império Russo. Cresceu em Vilna, onde cumpriu parte dos estudos, outra parte na Polônia. Viveu em Paris , período em que absorveu as idéias estéticas e políticas dos círculos de vanguarda. Para ele, escrever sempre foi um ato político. Suas primeiras obras prevêem a iminência de um cataclismo internacional e o torna líder da escola catastrofista de poesia polonesa.

Durante a Segunda Guerra Mundial, Milosz passou à clandestinidade e combateu as forças de ocupação nazistas em Varsóvia: publicou poemas de resistência, como Canção Invencível. Após o conflito, foi adido cultural do novo governo comunista da Polônia, mas, em 1951, desiludido com o regime, desertou para Paris. Em 1953, publicou A Mente Cativa, uma coletânea de ensaios sobre a submissão dos intelectuais poloneses ao comunismo. Em 1960, o poeta emigrou para os Estados Unidos, onde continuou ponderando sobre a fragilidade, crueldade e a corruptibilidade humana.

Em reconhecimento por seu pensamento humanista sobre a liberdade, a consciência e o "poder do totalitarismo sobre corpos e mentes", foi laureado com o Nobel de Literatura de 1980.

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Citações Czesław Miłosz

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„Only if we assume that a poet constantly strives to liberate himself from borrowed styles in search for reality, is he dangerous. In a room where people unanimously maintain a conspiracy of silence, one word of truth sounds like a pistol shot.“

—  Czeslaw Milosz
Context: Only if we assume that a poet constantly strives to liberate himself from borrowed styles in search for reality, is he dangerous. In a room where people unanimously maintain a conspiracy of silence, one word of truth sounds like a pistol shot. And, alas, a temptation to pronounce it, similar to an acute itching, becomes an obsession which doesn't allow one to think of anything else. That is why a poet chooses internal or external exile. It is not certain, however, that he is motivated exclusively by his concern with actuality. He may also desire to free himself from it and elsewhere, in other countries, on other shores, to recover, at least for short moments, his true vocation — which is to contemplate Being. Nobel lecture (8 December 1980)

„This is a place accepted, not chosen.“

—  Czeslaw Milosz
Context: We are a poor people, much afflicted. We camped under various stars, Where you dip water with a cup from a muddy river And slice your bread with a pocketknife. This is a place accepted, not chosen. "It Was Winter" (1964), trans. Czesław Miłosz, Robert Hass, Robert Pinsky and Renata Gorczynski

„Under various names, I have praised only you, rivers!“

—  Czeslaw Milosz
Context: Under various names, I have praised only you, rivers! You are milk and honey and love and death and dance. From a spring in hidden grottoes, seeping from mossy rocks, Where a goddess pours live water from a pitcher, At clear streams in the meadow, where rills murmur underground, Your race and my race begin, and amazement, and quick passage. "Rivers" (1980), trans. Renata Gorczynski and Robert Hass

„I still think too much about the mothers
And ask what is man born of woman.“

—  Czeslaw Milosz
Context: I still think too much about the mothers And ask what is man born of woman. He curls himself up and protects his head While he is kicked by heavy boots; on fire and running, He burns with bright flame; a bulldozer sweeps him into a clay pit. Her child. Embracing a teddy bear. Conceived in ecstasy. "Preparation," trans. Czesław Miłosz and Robert Hass

„I am only a man: I need visible signs.“

—  Czeslaw Milosz
Context: I am only a man: I need visible signs. I tire easily, building the stairway of abstraction. Many a time I asked, you know it well, that the statue in church lift its hand, only once, just once, for me. But I understand that signs must be human, therefore call one man, anyone on earth, not me — after all I have some decency — and allow me, when I look at him, to marvel at you. "Veni Creator" (1961), trans. Czesław Miłosz and Robert Pinsky

„Until, when all is legend
And many years have passed,
On a great Campo di Fiori
Rage will kindle at a poet's word.“

—  Czeslaw Milosz
Context: Those dying here, the lonely Forgotten by the world, Our tongue becomes for them The language of an ancient planet. Until, when all is legend And many years have passed, On a great Campo di Fiori Rage will kindle at a poet's word. "Campo dei Fiori" (1943), trans. Louis Iribarne and David Brooks

Publicidade

„A purely physiological study of one particular passer-by in preference to another is meaningless.“

—  Czeslaw Milosz
Context: What is the significance of the lives of the people he passes, of the senseless bustle, the laughter, the pursuit of money, the stupid animal diversions? By using a little intelligence he can easily classify the passers-by according to type; he can guess their social status, their habits and their preoccupations. A fleeting moment reveals their childhood, manhood, and old age, and then they vanish. A purely physiological study of one particular passer-by in preference to another is meaningless. If one penetrates into the minds of these people, one discovers utter nonsense. They are totally unaware of the fact that nothing is their own, that everything is part of their historical formation — their occupations, their clothes, their gestures and expressions, their beliefs and ideas. They are the force of inertia personified, victims of the delusion that each individual exists as a self. If at least these were souls, as the Church taught, or the monads of Leibnitz! But these beliefs have perished. What remains is an aversion to an atomized vision of life, to the mentality that isolates every phenomenon, such as eating, drinking, dressing, earning money, fornicating. And what is there beyond these things? Should such a state of affairs continue? Why should it continue? Such questions are almost synonymous with what is known as hatred of the bourgeoisie.

„He doesn't know birds live
In another time than man.
He doesn't know a tree lives
In another time than birds“

—  Czeslaw Milosz
Context: He doesn't know birds live In another time than man. He doesn't know a tree lives In another time than birds And will grow slowly Upward in a gray column Thinking with its roots Of the silver of underworld kingdoms. "Birth" (1947), trans. Peter Dale Scott

„Vulgarized knowledge characteristically gives birth to a feeling that everything is understandable and explained.“

—  Czeslaw Milosz
Context: Vulgarized knowledge characteristically gives birth to a feeling that everything is understandable and explained. It is like a system of bridges built over chasms. One can travel boldly ahead over these bridges, ignoring the chasms. It is forbidden to look down into them; but that, alas, does not alter the fact that they exist.

„But precisely because such an analysis of history comes closer to the truth, it is more dangerous. It gives the illusion of full knowledge“

—  Czeslaw Milosz
Context: Undoubtedly, one comes closer to the truth when one sees history as the expression of the class struggle rather than a series of private quarrels among kings and nobles. But precisely because such an analysis of history comes closer to the truth, it is more dangerous. It gives the illusion of full knowledge; it supplies answers to all questions, answers which merely run around in a circle repeating a few formulas.

Publicidade

„They are totally unaware of the fact that nothing is their own, that everything is part of their historical formation — their occupations, their clothes, their gestures and expressions, their beliefs and ideas.“

—  Czeslaw Milosz
Context: What is the significance of the lives of the people he passes, of the senseless bustle, the laughter, the pursuit of money, the stupid animal diversions? By using a little intelligence he can easily classify the passers-by according to type; he can guess their social status, their habits and their preoccupations. A fleeting moment reveals their childhood, manhood, and old age, and then they vanish. A purely physiological study of one particular passer-by in preference to another is meaningless. If one penetrates into the minds of these people, one discovers utter nonsense. They are totally unaware of the fact that nothing is their own, that everything is part of their historical formation — their occupations, their clothes, their gestures and expressions, their beliefs and ideas. They are the force of inertia personified, victims of the delusion that each individual exists as a self. If at least these were souls, as the Church taught, or the monads of Leibnitz! But these beliefs have perished. What remains is an aversion to an atomized vision of life, to the mentality that isolates every phenomenon, such as eating, drinking, dressing, earning money, fornicating. And what is there beyond these things? Should such a state of affairs continue? Why should it continue? Such questions are almost synonymous with what is known as hatred of the bourgeoisie.

„There was a time when only wise books were read
helping us to bear our pain and misery.“

—  Czeslaw Milosz
Context: There was a time when only wise books were read helping us to bear our pain and misery. This, after all, is not quite the same as leafing through a thousand works fresh from psychiatric clinics. And yet the world is different from what it seems to be and we are other than how we see ourselves in our ravings. "Ars Poetica?"

„Where is time that both destroys and saves us?“

—  Czeslaw Milosz
Context: But where is our, dear to us, mortality? Where is time that both destroys and saves us? This is too difficult for me. Peace eternal Could have no mornings and no evenings, Such a deficiency speaks against it. "How It Should Be in Heaven" (1986), trans. Czesŀaw Miŀosz and Robert Hass

„Love means to look at yourself
The way one looks at distant things
For you are only one thing among many.“

—  Czeslaw Milosz
Context: Love means to look at yourself The way one looks at distant things For you are only one thing among many. And whoever sees that way heals his heart, Without knowing it, from various ills — A bird and a tree say to him: Friend. "The World": Love (1943), trans. Czesŀaw Miŀosz

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