„Democracy extends the sphere of individual freedom, socialism restricts it. Democracy attaches all possible value to each man; socialism makes each man a mere agent, a mere number. Democracy and socialism have nothing in common but one word: equality. But notice the difference: while democracy seeks equality in liberty, socialism seeks equality in restraint and servitude.“

—  Alexis De Tocqueville, 12 September 1848, "Discours prononcé à l'assemblée constituante le 12 Septembre 1848 sur la question du droit au travail", Oeuvres complètes, vol. IX, p. 546 https://fr.wikisource.org/wiki/Page:Tocqueville_-_%C5%92uvres_compl%C3%A8tes,_%C3%A9dition_1866,_volume_9.djvu/564; Translation (from Hayek, The Road to Serfdom): Original text: La démocratie étend la sphère de l'indépendance individuelle, le socialisme la resserre. La démocratie donne toute sa valeur possible à chaque homme, le socialisme fait de chaque homme un agent, un instrument, un chiffre. La démocratie et le socialisme ne se tiennent que par un mot, l'égalité ; mais remarquez la différence : la démocratie veut l'égalité dans la liberté, et le socialisme veut l'égalité dans la gêne et dans la servitude.
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—  Stanley Baldwin Former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom 1867 - 1947
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„Socialism is the completion of democracy, not the negation of it.“

—  Terry Eagleton British writer, academic and educator 1943
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—  Karl Marx German philosopher, economist, sociologist, journalist and revolutionary socialist 1818 - 1883
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„Reality has changed, and we changed with it. However, I never changed sides. I have always been on the side of justice, democracy and social equality.“

—  Dilma Rousseff 36th President of Brazil 1947
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Context: Social democracy is objectively the moderate wing of fascism.... These organisations (ie Fascism and social democracy) are not antipodes, they are twins. “Concerning the International Situation,” Works, Vol. 6, January-November, 1924, pp. 293-314.

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