„My new knight mistress is famed for wielding sharp edges: Sword, Knife and Tongue!“

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Tamora Pierce176
American writer of fantasy novels for children 1954
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„If you try to wield the long sword quickly you will mistake the Way. To wield the long sword well you must wield it calmly.“

—  Miyamoto Musashi Japanese martial artist, writer, artist 1585 - 1645
Context: Knowing the Way of the long sword means we can wield with two fingers the sword that we usually carry. If we know the path of the sword well, we can wield it easily. If you try to wield the long sword quickly you will mistake the Way. To wield the long sword well you must wield it calmly. If you try to wield it quickly, like a folding fan or a short sword, you will err by using "short sword chopping". You cannot cut a man with a long sword using this method.

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„There is no fast way of wielding the long sword.“

—  Miyamoto Musashi Japanese martial artist, writer, artist 1585 - 1645
Context: There is no fast way of wielding the long sword. The long sword should be wielded broadly, and the companion sword closely. This is the first thing to realise. According to this Ichi school, you can win with a long weapon, and yet you can also win with a short weapon. In short, the Way of the Ichi school is the spirit of winning, whatever the weapon and whatever its size.

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„We need knew knights, but without swords.“

—  Dejan Stojanovic poet, writer, and businessman 1959
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„But You know, Landscape is my mistress — 't is to her that I look for fame — and all that the warmth of the imagination renders dear to Man.“

—  John Constable English Romantic painter 1776 - 1837
Letter to his future wife, Maria Bicknell (22 September 1812), as quoted in Leslie Parris and Ian Fleming-Williams, Constable (Tate Gallery Publications, London, 1993), p. 23

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„Science fiction has always seemed to me such a polyglot, an exotic mistress, a parasite, a kind of new language coined for the purpose of giving tongue to the demented twentieth century.“

—  Brian W. Aldiss British science fiction author 1925 - 2017
Context: Here is what I wrote about SF. If it has a familiar ring, my publishers liked it well enough to make it into a postcard for publicity purposes. 'I love SF for its surrealist verve, its loony non-reality, its piercing truths, its wit, its masked melancholy, its nose for damnation, its bunkum, its contempt for home comforts, its slewed astronomy, its xenophilia, its hip, its classlessness, its mysterious machines, its gaudy backdrops, its tragic insecurity.' Science fiction has always seemed to me such a polyglot, an exotic mistress, a parasite, a kind of new language coined for the purpose of giving tongue to the demented twentieth century.

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