„The most basic question is not what is best, but who shall decide what is best.“

Última atualização 3 de Junho de 2021. História

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Jean Paul Sartre photo
Brian W. Aldiss photo

„Aldiss’s second law of thermo-linguistics states that what is most popular is rarely best and that what is best is rarely most popular.“

—  Brian W. Aldiss British science fiction author 1925 - 2017

Science Fiction on the Titanic, in Brian Aldiss and Harry Harrison (eds.) The Year's Best SF 9 (1976), ISBN 0-8600-7894-9, p. 201

Solón photo

„Do not counsel what is most pleasant, but what is best.“

—  Solón Athenian legislator -638 - -558 a.C.

Demetrius of Phalerum, "Apophthegms of the Seven Sages," in Early Greek Philosophy, vol. 2 (Loeb Classical Library, volume 525), p. 141

Paul Carus photo
Nassim Nicholas Taleb photo

„What fools call “wasting time” is most often the best investment.“

—  Nassim Nicholas Taleb, livro The Bed of Procrustes: Philosophical and Practical Aphorisms

Fonte: The Bed of Procrustes: Philosophical and Practical Aphorisms (2010), p. 24

Richard Bach photo

„We teach best what we most need to learn.“

—  Richard Bach American spiritual writer 1936

Illusions : The Adventures of a Reluctant Messiah (1977)
Variante: You teach best what you most need to learn.
Fonte: Illusions: The Adventures of a Reluctant Messiah

Richard Bach photo
Robert Williams Buchanan photo

„And whosoe’er loves mortals most
Shall conquer Death the best,
Yea, whosoe’er grows beautiful
Shall grow divinely blest.“

—  Robert Williams Buchanan Scottish poet, novelist and dramatist 1841 - 1901

Balder the Beautiful (1877)
Contexto: “O Balder, he who fashion’d us,
And bade us live and move,
Shall weave for Death’s sad heavenly hair
Immortal flowers of love.
“Ah! never fail’d my servant Death,
Whene’er I named his name,—
But at my bidding he hath flown
As swift as frost or flame.
“Yea, as a sleuth-hound tracks a man,
And finds his form, and springs,
So hath he hunted down the gods
As well as human things!
“Yet only thro’ the strength of Death
A god shall fall or rise —
A thousand lie on the cold snows,
Stone still, with marble eyes.
“But whosoe’er shall conquer Death,
Tho’ mortal man he be,
Shall in his season rise again,
And live, with thee, and me!
“And whosoe’er loves mortals most
Shall conquer Death the best,
Yea, whosoe’er grows beautiful
Shall grow divinely blest.”
The white Christ raised his shining face
To that still bright’ning sky.
“Only the beautiful shall abide,
Only the base shall die!”

Azar Nafisi photo

„The best fiction always forced us to question what we took for granted. It questioned traditions and expectations when they seemed too immutable.“

—  Azar Nafisi, livro Reading Lolita in Tehran

Reading Lolita in Tehran (2003)
Contexto: I explained that most great works of the imagination were meant to make you feel like a stranger in your own home. The best fiction always forced us to question what we took for granted. It questioned traditions and expectations when they seemed too immutable. I told my students I wanted them in their readings to consider in what ways these works unsettled them, made them a little uneasy, made them look around and consider the world, like Alice in Wonderland, through different eyes.

Joseph E. Stiglitz photo
John Cleese photo

„He who laughs most, learns best.“

—  John Cleese actor from England 1939

As quoted in Creating Emotionally Safe Schools: A Guide for Educators and Parents‎ (2001) by Jane Bluestein, p. 215

Robin Hobb photo

„A simple question unlocks best.“

—  Robin Hobb, livro Assassin's Apprentice

Assassin's Apprentice

Wilhelm Reich photo

„The basic question, then is: What has made the animal, man, degenerate into a machine?“

—  Wilhelm Reich, livro The Mass Psychology of Fascism

Section 3 : Work Democracy versus Politics. The Natural Social Forces for the Mastery of the Emotional Plague
The Mass Psychology of Fascism (1933), Ch. 10 : Work Democracy
Contexto: MAN IS FUNDAMENTALLY AN ANIMAL. Animals, as distinct from man, are not machine-like, not sadistic; their societies, within the same species, are incomparably more peaceful than those of man. The basic question, then is: What has made the animal, man, degenerate into a machine?
When I say "animal," I do not mean anything bad, cruel or "base"; I am stating a biological fact. Man has developed the peculiar concept that he is not an animal at all, but, well — man; a creature which long since has shed that which is "bad," which is "animal." He demarcates himself in all possible ways from the bad animal and points, in proof of his "being better," to culture and civilization which distinguish him from the animal. He shows, in his whole behavior, his "theories of values," his moral philosophies, his "monkey trials" and such, that he does not want to be reminded of the fact that basically he is an animal, an animal, furthermore, which has much more in common with the "animal" than with that being which he asserts to be and dreams of being. The theory of the German Übermensch has this origin. Man shows by his maliciousness, his inability to live in peace with his kind, his wars, that what distinguishes him from the other animals is only his unbounded sadism and the mechanical trinity of the authoritarian concept of life, mechanistic science and the machine. If one looks at the results of civilization as they present themselves over long periods of time, one finds that these contentions of man are not only erroneous; more than that, they seem to be made expressly for the purpose of making man forget that he is an animal.

Harriet Beecher Stowe photo

„These men and Christians cannot know what slavery is; if they did, such a question could never be open for discussion. And from this arose a desire to exhibit it in a living dramatic reality. She has endeavored to show it fairly, in its best and its worst phases. In its best aspect, she has, perhaps, been successful; but, oh! who shall say what yet remains untold in that valley and shadow of death, that lies the other side?“

—  Harriet Beecher Stowe, livro Uncle Tom's Cabin

Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852), Concluding Remarks
Contexto: The author hopes she has done justice to that nobility, generosity, and humanity, which in many cases characterize individuals at the South. Such instances save us from utter despair of our kind. But, she asks any person, who knows the world, are such characters common, anywhere?
For many years of her life, the author avoided all reading upon or allusion to the subject of slavery, considering it as too painful to be inquired into, and one which advancing light and civilization would certainly live down. But, since the legislative act of 1850, when she heard, with perfect surprise and consternation, Christian and humane people actually recommending the remanding escaped fugitives into slavery, as a duty binding on good citizens, — when she heard, on all hands, from kind, compassionate and estimable people, in the free states of the North, deliberations and discussions as to what Christian duty could be on this head, — she could only think, These men and Christians cannot know what slavery is; if they did, such a question could never be open for discussion. And from this arose a desire to exhibit it in a living dramatic reality. She has endeavored to show it fairly, in its best and its worst phases. In its best aspect, she has, perhaps, been successful; but, oh! who shall say what yet remains untold in that valley and shadow of death, that lies the other side?

Garry Kasparov photo
Leonardo DiCaprio photo

„If you can do what you do best and be happy, you're further along in life than most people.“

—  Leonardo DiCaprio American actor and film producer 1974

http://www.popmonk.com/actors/leonardo-dicaprio/quotes-leonardo-dicaprio.htm

Arundhati Roy photo
Virginia Woolf photo

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