„It is not necessary to change. Survival is not mandatory.“

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Johnny Carson3
1925 - 2005
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Edmund Burke photo

„If it is not necessary to change, it is necessary not to change.“

—  Edmund Burke Anglo-Irish statesman 1729 - 1797
Misattributed, Attributed to Benjamin Disraeli, to William Gerard Hamilton, to George Bernard Shaw, to John F. Kennedy (who at any rate quoted it) and to Edmund Burke, it was actually said by Lucius Cary, 2nd Viscount Falkland in a speech in the House of Commons on 1641-11-22

Benjamin Disraeli photo

„If it is not necessary to change, it is necessary not to change.“

—  Benjamin Disraeli British Conservative politician, writer, aristocrat and Prime Minister 1804 - 1881
Misattributed, Attributed to Edmund Burke, to William Gerard Hamilton, to George Bernard Shaw, to John F. Kennedy (who quoted it) and to Benjamin Disraeli, it was actually said by Lucius Cary, 2nd Viscount Falkland in a speech in the House of Commons on 1641-11-22.

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„This is the kind of change that survives.“

—  Edwin H. Land American scientist and inventor 1909 - 1991
Generation of Greatness (1957), Context: In thinking about what the human animal might have gone through in the evolutionary process, have you wondered how some of the small changes which must have occurred could have had survival value? Haven't you wondered how they could have survived, when, in all of our experimental work every small change we make dies? … How many changes must have occurred in the human eye, occurred and died, before one change came along — an apparently trivial change … that gave the whole animal a significant increase in its power to perceive and hunt down its enemies and find its food. This is the kind of change that survives.

Pierre Louis Maupertuis photo

„When a change occurs in Nature, the quantity of action necessary for that change is as small as possible.“

—  Pierre Louis Maupertuis French mathematician, philosopher and man of letters 1698 - 1759
Les Loix du Mouvement et du Repos, déduites d'un Principe Métaphysique (1746)

Abraham Maslow photo

„What is necessary to change a person is to change his awareness of himself.“

—  Abraham Maslow American psychologist 1908 - 1970
1970s and later, As quoted in Life In the Open Sea (1972) by William M. Stephens, p. 21.

Viktor E. Frankl photo
Tony Blair photo

„Ideals survive through change. They die through inertia in the face of challenge.“

—  Tony Blair former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom 1953
2000s, European Parliament debates http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?pubRef=-//EP//TEXT+CRE+20050623+ITEM-004+DOC+XML+V0//EN&language=EN&query=INTERV&detail=4-010 Speech to the European Parliament outlining the priorities of the British Presidency, 23 June 2005.

Ernst Fischer photo

„Art is necessary in order that man should be able to recognize and change the world. But art is also necessary by virtue of the magic inherent in it.“

—  Ernst Fischer Austrian literature historian, publicist and writer 1899 - 1972
The Necessity of Art: A Marxist Approach (1965), Penguin Books, translated by Anna Bostock.

Ernesto Che Guevara photo

„Survival in a stable environment depends almost entirely on remembering the strategies for survival that have been developed in the past, and so the conservation and transmission of these becomes the primary mission of education. But, a paradoxical situation develops when change becomes the primary characteristic of the environment. Then the task turns inside out — survival in a rapidly changing environment depends almost entirely upon being able to identify which of the old concepts are relevant to the demands imposed by the new threats to survival, and which are not.“

—  Neil Postman American writer and academic 1931 - 2003
Teaching as a Subversive Activity (1969), Context: The BASIC FUNCTION of all education, even in the most traditional sense, is to increase the survival prospects of the group. If this function is fulfilled, the group survives. If not, it doesn't. There have been times when this function was not fulfilled, and groups (some of them we even call "civilizations") disappeared. Generally, this resulted from changes in the kind of threats the group faced. The threats changed, but the education did not, and so the group, in a way, "disappeared itself" (to use a phrase from Catch-22). The tendency seems to be for most "educational" systems, from patterns of training in "primitive" tribal societies to school systems in technological societies, to fall imperceptibly into a role devoted exclusively to the conservation of old ideas, concepts, attitudes, skills, and perceptions. This happens largely because of the unconsciously held belief that these old ways of thinking and doing are necessary to the survival of the group. …Survival in a stable environment depends almost entirely on remembering the strategies for survival that have been developed in the past, and so the conservation and transmission of these becomes the primary mission of education. But, a paradoxical situation develops when change becomes the primary characteristic of the environment. Then the task turns inside out — survival in a rapidly changing environment depends almost entirely upon being able to identify which of the old concepts are relevant to the demands imposed by the new threats to survival, and which are not. Then a new educational task becomes critical: getting the group to unlearn (to "forget") the irrelevant concepts as a prior condition of learning. What we are saying is that the "selective forgetting" is necessary for survival.

Sathya Sai Baba photo
Clarence Darrow photo

„It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent, but rather the one most adaptable to change.“

—  Clarence Darrow American lawyer and leading member of the American Civil Liberties Union 1857 - 1938
Misattributed, As quoted in Improving the Quality of Life for the Black Elderly: Challenges and Opportunities : Hearing before the Select Committee on Aging, House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, first session, September 25, 1987 (1988) This quote's earliest known source is from Leon C. Megginson (see Charles Darwin)

Charles Darwin photo

„It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent, but rather the one most adaptable to change.“

—  Charles Darwin British naturalist, author of "On the origin of species, by means of natural selection" 1809 - 1882
Misattributed, The earliest known appearance of this basic statement is a paraphrase of Darwin in the writings of Leon C. Megginson, a management sociologist at Louisiana State University. [[Megginson, Leon C., Lessons from Europe for American Business, Southwestern Social Science Quarterly, 1963, 44(1), 3-13, p. 4]] Megginson's paraphrase (with slight variations) was later turned into a quotation. See the summary of Nicholas Matzke's findings in "One thing Darwin didn't say: the source for a misquotation" http://www.darwinproject.ac.uk/one-thing-darwin-didnt-say at the Darwin Correspondence Project. The statement is incorrectly attributed, without any source, to Clarence Darrow in Improving the Quality of Life for the Black Elderly: Challenges and Opportunities : Hearing before the Select Committee on Aging, House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, first session, September 25, 1987 (1988).

Jesse Jackson photo

„When we divide, we cannot win. We must find common ground as the basis for survival and development and change, and growth.“

—  Jesse Jackson African-American civil rights activist and politician 1941
Address to the Democratic National Convention (July 19, 1988)

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“