„A man who wants the truth becomes a scientist; a man who wants to give free play to his subjectivity may become a writer; but what should a man do who wants something in between?“

—  Robert Musil, livro O Homem sem Qualidades

Fonte: The Man Without Qualities

Última atualização 22 de Maio de 2020. História
Robert Musil photo
Robert Musil15
1880 - 1942

Citações relacionadas

PZ Myers photo

„I didn't become a scientist because I want to impress lawyers. The word for people who are neutral about truth is "liars".“

—  PZ Myers American scientist and associate professor of biology 1957

at Council for Secular Humanism, October 9, 2010.
Contexto: I have been told that my position won't win the creationist court cases. Do you think I care? I didn't become a scientist because I want to impress lawyers. The word for people who are neutral about truth is "liars".

Antonin Artaud photo
Wilhelm Reich photo

„The Little Man does not want to hear the truth about himself. He does not want the great responsibility which is his. He wants to remain a Little Man.“

—  Wilhelm Reich, livro Listen, Little Man!

Listen, Little Man! (1948)
Contexto: My intellect tells me: "Tell the truth at any cost." The Little Man in me says: "It is stupid to expose oneself to the little man, to put oneself at his mercy. The Little Man does not want to hear the truth about himself. He does not want the great responsibility which is his. He wants to remain a Little Man. He wants to remain a Little Man, or wants to become a little great man. He wants to become rich, or a party leader, or commander of a legion, or secretary of the society for the abolition of vice. But he does not want to assume responsibility for his work..."

Adrienne Rich photo

„The unconscious wants truth. It ceases to speak to those who want something else more than truth.“

—  Adrienne Rich American poet, essayist and feminist 1929 - 2012

Fonte: On Lies, Secrets, and Silence: Selected Prose, 1966-1978

Stephen Crane photo
Sinclair Lewis photo

„The normal man, he does not care much what he does except that he should eat and sleep and make love. But the scientist is intensely religious—he is so religious that he will not accept quarter-truths, because they are an insult to his faith.
He wants that everything should be subject to inexorable laws. He is equal opposed to the capitalists who t'ink their silly money-grabbing is a system, and to liberals who t'ink man is not a fighting animal; he takes both the American booster and the European aristocrat, and he ignores all their blithering. Ignores it! All of it! He hates the preachers who talk their fables, but he iss not too kindly to the anthropologists and historians who can only make guesses, yet they have the nerf to call themselves scientists! Oh, yes, he is a man that all nice good-natured people should naturally hate!“

—  Sinclair Lewis, livro Arrowsmith

Arrowsmith (1925)
Contexto: Perhaps I am a crank, Martin. There are many who hate me. There are plots against me—oh, you t'ink I imagine it, but you shall see! I make many mistakes. But one thing I keep always pure: the religion of a scientist.
To be a scientist—it is not just a different job, so that a man should choose between being a scientist and being an explorer or a bond-salesman or a physician or a king or a farmer. It is a tangle of ver-y obscure emotions, like mysticism, or wanting to write poetry; it makes its victim all different from the good normal man. The normal man, he does not care much what he does except that he should eat and sleep and make love. But the scientist is intensely religious—he is so religious that he will not accept quarter-truths, because they are an insult to his faith.
He wants that everything should be subject to inexorable laws. He is equal opposed to the capitalists who t'ink their silly money-grabbing is a system, and to liberals who t'ink man is not a fighting animal; he takes both the American booster and the European aristocrat, and he ignores all their blithering. Ignores it! All of it! He hates the preachers who talk their fables, but he iss not too kindly to the anthropologists and historians who can only make guesses, yet they have the nerf to call themselves scientists! Oh, yes, he is a man that all nice good-natured people should naturally hate! ~ Gottlieb, Ch. 26

Barack Obama photo

„The only people who don't want to disclose the truth are people with something to hide.“

—  Barack Obama 44th President of the United States of America 1961

Weekly Address https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2010/08/21/weekly-address-president-obama-challenges-politicians-benefiting-citizen (21 August 2010)
2010

Martin Buber photo

„Man must be free of it all, of his bad conscience and of the bad salvation from this conscience in order to become in truth the way.“

—  Martin Buber German Jewish Existentialist philosopher and theologian 1878 - 1965

Fonte: What is Man? (1938), p. 178
Contexto: Man must be free of it all, of his bad conscience and of the bad salvation from this conscience in order to become in truth the way. Now, he no longer promises others the fulfillment of his duties, but promises himself the fulfillment of man.

Samuel Goldwyn photo
Arthur Schopenhauer photo

„To free a man from error is to give, not to take away. Knowledge that a thing is false is a truth. Error always does harm; sooner or later it will bring mischief to the man who harbors it.“

—  Arthur Schopenhauer German philosopher 1788 - 1860

"Religion: A Dialogue."
Variant translation: To free a man from error does not mean to take something from him, but to give him something.
Essays
Fonte: Essays and Aphorisms
Contexto: To free a man from error is to give, not to take away. Knowledge that a thing is false is a truth. Error always does harm; sooner or later it will bring mischief to the man who harbors it. Then give up deceiving people; confess ignorance of what you don't know, and leave everyone to form his own articles of faith for himself. Perhaps they won't turn out so bad, especially as they'll rub one another's corners down, and mutually rectify mistakes. The existence of many views will at any rate lay a foundation of tolerance. Those who possess knowledge and capacity may betake themselves to the study of philosophy, or even in their own persons carry the history of philosophy a step further.

„If you want truth, you should begin by giving it.“

—  Lloyd Alexander, The Chronicles of Prydain

Fonte: The Chronicles of Prydain (1964–1968), Book IV: Taran Wanderer (1967), Chapter 1
Contexto: Speak up, my boy. If you want truth, you should begin by giving it.

Averroes photo
Robert Musil photo
John Ruskin photo

„He who has the truth at his heart need never fear the want of persuasion on his tongue.“

—  John Ruskin, livro The Stones of Venice

Volume III, chapter II, section 99.
The Stones of Venice (1853)
Fonte: The Stones of Venice: Volume I. The Foundations

Sydney Smith photo

„His was the isolation of every man who seeks the truth diligently, no matter how unpleasant its implications may be to others or even to himself.“

—  George Woodcock Canadian writer of political biography and history, an anarchist thinker, an essayist and literary critic 1912 - 1995

The Crystal Spirit : A Study of George Orwell (1966), Ch. I : The Man I Remembered, p. 3
Contexto: Orwell can only be understood as an essentially quixotic man. … He defended, passionately and as a matter of principle, unpopular causes. Often without regard to reason he would strike out against anything which offended his conceptions of right, justice and decency, yet, as many who crossed lances with him had reason to know, he could be a very chivalrous opponent, impelled by a sense of fair play that would lead to public recantation of accusations he had eventually decided were unfair. In his own way he was a man of the left, but he attacked its holy images as fervently as he did those of the right. And however much he might on occasion find himself in uneasy and temporary alliance with others, he was — in the end — as much a man in isolation as Don Quixote. His was the isolation of every man who seeks the truth diligently, no matter how unpleasant its implications may be to others or even to himself.

Otto Rank photo
William Hazlitt photo

„An honest man speaks the truth, though it may give offence; a vain man, in order that it may.“

—  William Hazlitt English writer 1778 - 1830

No. 387
Characteristics, in the manner of Rochefoucauld's Maxims (1823)

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