„Neither seek nor avoid; take what comes. It is liberty to be affected by nothing. Do not merely endure; be unattached.“

—  Swami Vivekananda, Pearls of Wisdom
Swami Vivekananda photo
Swami Vivekananda10
monge e filósofo hindu indiano 1863 - 1902
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Sitting Bull photo

„I am nothing, neither a chief nor a soldier.“

—  Sitting Bull Hunkpapa Lakota medicine man and holy man 1831 - 1890
Recorded by a reporter after Sitting Bull's retreat to Canada after being defeated in the Black Hills War, originally published in the New York Herald on November 16, 1877. Published in Utley, Robert M. The Lance and the Shield. New York: Henry Holt and Co., 1993. p. 190.

Jonathan Swift photo
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William Hazlitt photo

„It is better to be able neither to read nor write than to be able to do nothing else.“

—  William Hazlitt English writer 1778 - 1830
Table Talk: Essays On Men And Manners http://www.blupete.com/Literature/Essays/TableHazIV.htm (1821-1822), "On the Ignorance of the Learned"

 Sallust photo

„It becomes all men, Senators, who deliberate on dubious matters, to be influenced neither by hatred, affection, anger, nor pity.“

—  Sallust Roman historian, politician -86 - -34 a.C.
Bellum Catilinae (c. 44 BC), Omnes homines, patres conscripti, qui de rebus dubiis consultant, ab odio, amicitia, ira atque misericordia vacuos esse decet. Chapter LI, section 1

Anthony Eden photo

„There can be only one peace which will be acceptable to the people of this country. That is a peace which takes every precaution in our power to see to it that neither Germany nor Japan has any avoidable opportunity of starting this business again.“

—  Anthony Eden British Conservative politician, prime minister 1897 - 1977
Speech https://api.parliament.uk/historic-hansard/commons/1944/sep/29/war-and-international-situation#column_698 in the House of Commons (29 September 1944)

Fred Shero photo

„To avoid criticism, say nothing, do nothing, be nothing.“

—  Fred Shero Former ice hockey player and coach 1925 - 1990
Glenn Liebman Hockey Shorts: 1,001 of the games funniest one liners 1996 70, 113 & 229 Contemporary Books 0-8092-3351-7

Gustave de Molinari photo
Learned Hand photo

„What do we mean when we say that first of all we seek liberty?“

—  Learned Hand American legal scholar, Court of Appeals judge 1872 - 1961
Extra-judicial writings, Context: What do we mean when we say that first of all we seek liberty? I often wonder whether we do not rest our hopes too much upon constitutions, upon laws and upon courts. These are false hopes; believe me, these are false hopes. Liberty lies in the hearts of men and women; when it dies there, no constitution, no law, no court can save it; no constitution, no law, no court can even do much to help it… What is this liberty that must lie in the hearts of men and women? It is not the ruthless, the unbridled will; it is not the freedom to do as one likes. That is the denial of liberty and leads straight to its overthrow. A society in which men recognize no check on their freedom soon becomes a society where freedom is the possession of only a savage few — as we have learned to our sorrow. What then is the spirit of liberty? I cannot define it; I can only tell you my own faith. The spirit of liberty is the spirit which is not too sure that it is right; the spirit of liberty is the spirit which seeks to understand the minds of other men and women; the spirit of liberty is the spirit which weighs their interests alongside its own without bias; the spirit of liberty remembers that not even a sparrow falls to earth unheeded; the spirit of liberty is the spirit of Him who, near two thousand years ago, taught mankind that lesson it has never learned, but has never quite forgotten; that there may be a kingdom where the least shall be heard and considered side by side with the greatest. “The Spirit of Liberty” - speech at “I Am an American Day” ceremony, Central Park, New York City (21 May 1944).

Calvin Coolidge photo
Abraham Joshua Heschel photo

„There are neither skies nor oceans, neither birds nor trees — there are only signs of what can never be perceived.“

—  Abraham Joshua Heschel Polish-American Conservative Judaism Rabbi 1907 - 1972
Moral Grandeur and Spiritual Audacity: Essays (1997), Context: It seems as though we have arrived at a point in history, closest to the instincts and remotest from ideals, where the self stands like a wall between God and man. It is the period of a divine eclipse. We sail the seas, we count the stars, we split the atom, but never ask: Is there nothing but a dead universe and our reckless curiosity? Primitive man's humble ear was alert to the inwardness of the world, while the modern man is presumptuous enough to claim that he has the sole monopoly over soul and spirit, that he is the only thing alive in the universe. … But there is a dawn of wonder and surprise in our souls, when the things that surround us suddenly slip off the triteness with which we have endowed them, and their strangeness opens like a gap between them and our mind, a gap that no words can fill. … What is the incense of self-esteem to him who tastes in all things the flavor of the utterly unknown, the fragrance of what is beyond our senses? There are neither skies nor oceans, neither birds nor trees — there are only signs of what can never be perceived. And all power and beauty are mere straws in the fire of a pure man's vision. "The Holy Dimension", p. 329

George Steiner photo
Jared Diamond photo

„History, as well as life itself, is complicated; neither life nor history is an enterprise for those who seek simplicity and consistency.“

—  Jared Diamond, livro Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed
Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed (2005), Page 349

Arthur Stanley Eddington photo

„You will understand the true spirit neither of science nor of religion unless seeking is placed in the forefront.“

—  Arthur Stanley Eddington British astrophysicist 1882 - 1944
Science and the Unseen World (1929), Context: You will understand the true spirit neither of science nor of religion unless seeking is placed in the forefront.<!--IX, p.88

Anton Chekhov photo
Jiddu Krishnamurti photo

„Observe, and in that observation there is neither the "observer" nor the "observed" — there is only observation taking place.“

—  Jiddu Krishnamurti Indian spiritual philosopher 1895 - 1986
1970s, Context: Do you decide to observe? Or do you merely observe? Do you decide and say, "I am going to observe and learn"? For then there is the question: "Who is deciding?" Is it will that says, "I must"? And when it fails, it chastises itself further and says, "I must, must, must"; in that there is conflict; therefore the state of mind that has decided to observe is not observation at all. You are walking down the road, somebody passes you by, you observe and you may say to yourself, "How ugly he is; how he smells; I wish he would not do this or that". You are aware of your responses to that passer-by, you are aware that you are judging, condemning or justifying; you are observing. You do not say, "I must not judge, I must not justify". In being aware of your responses, there is no decision at all. You see somebody who insulted you yesterday. Immediately all your hackles are up, you become nervous or anxious, you begin to dislike; be aware of your dislike, be aware of all that, do not "decide" to be aware. Observe, and in that observation there is neither the "observer" nor the "observed" — there is only observation taking place. The "observer" exists only when you accumulate in the observation; when you say, "He is my friend because he has flattered me", or, "He is not my friend, because he has said something ugly about me, or something true which I do not like." That is accumulation through observation and that accumulation is the observer. When you observe without accumulation, then there is no judgement. 5th Public Talk Saanen (26th July 1970); also in "Fear and Pleasure", The Collected Works, Vol. X

Ferenc Dávid photo

„Neither the sword of popes, nor the cross, nor the image of death — nothing will halt the march of truth.“

—  Ferenc Dávid Hungarian noble 1510 - 1579
Context: Neither the sword of popes, nor the cross, nor the image of death — nothing will halt the march of truth. I wrote what I felt and that is what I preached with trusting spirit. I am convinced that after my destruction the teachings of false prophets will collapse. His last message, carved onto the walls of his dungeon cell, as quoted in For Faith and Freedom (1997) by Charles A. Howe, p. 109 <!-- Skinner House Books, Boston; also quoted on their web page [LINK now DEAD 2016·03·01] about the Transylvania Unitarian Church (Archive 2007) https://web.archive.org/web/20070717180511/www.emersonhou.org/Transylvania.htm by the Emerson Unitarian Universalist Church, Houston -->

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