„For how can one know color in perpetual green, and what good is warmth without cold to give it sweetness?“

—  John Steinbeck, livro Travels with Charley: In Search of America
John Steinbeck photo
John Steinbeck27
1902 - 1968

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Leonardo DiCaprio photo

„Dark green is my favorite color. It's the color of nature and the color of money and the color of moss!“

—  Leonardo DiCaprio American actor and film producer 1974
http://www.popmonk.com/actors/leonardo-dicaprio/quotes-leonardo-dicaprio.htm

Pablo Picasso photo
Michael Morpurgo photo

„The Tennessee stud was long and lean
The color of the sun and his eyes were green.“

—  Jimmy Driftwood singer 1907 - 1998
Context: The Tennessee stud was long and lean The color of the sun and his eyes were green. He had the nerve and he had the blood And there never was a hoss like the Tennessee stud. "Tennessee Stud" (1958)

Maxfield Parrish photo

„Mix a rose madder with white, let us say, and you get a pink, quite different from the original madder, and the result is a surface color instead of a transparent one, a color you look on instead of into. One does not paint long out of doors before it becomes apparent that a green tree has a lot of red in it. You may not see the red because your eye is blinded by the strong green, but it is there never the less. So if you mix a red with the green you get a sort of mud, each color killing the other. But by the other method. when the green is dry and a rose madder glazed over it you are apt to get what is wanted, and have a richness and glow of one color shining through the other, not to be had by mixing.“

—  Maxfield Parrish American painter and illustrator 1870 - 1966
Context: It is generally admitted that the most beautiful qualities of a color are in its transparent state, applied over a white ground with the light shining through the color. A modern Kodachrome is a delight when held up to the light with color luminous like stained glass. So many ask what is meant by transparent color, as though it were some special make. Most all color an artist uses is transparent: only a few are opaque, such as vermillion, cerulean blue, emerald green, the ochres and most yellows, etc. Colors are applied just as they come from the tube, the original purity and quality is never lost: a purple is pure rose madder glowing through a glaze of pure blue over glaze, or vice versa, the quality of each is never vitiated by mixing them together. Mix a rose madder with white, let us say, and you get a pink, quite different from the original madder, and the result is a surface color instead of a transparent one, a color you look on instead of into. One does not paint long out of doors before it becomes apparent that a green tree has a lot of red in it. You may not see the red because your eye is blinded by the strong green, but it is there never the less. So if you mix a red with the green you get a sort of mud, each color killing the other. But by the other method. when the green is dry and a rose madder glazed over it you are apt to get what is wanted, and have a richness and glow of one color shining through the other, not to be had by mixing. Imagine a Rembrandt if his magic browns were mixed together instead of glazed. The result would be a kind of chocolate. Then too, by this method of keeping colors by themselves some can be used which are taboo in mixtures. Letter to F.W Weber (1950); as quoted in Maxfield Parrish by Coy Ludwig (1997)

Kakinomoto no Hitomaro photo

„The colored leaves
Have hidden the paths
On the autumn mountain.
How can I find my girl,
Wandering on ways I do not know?“

—  Kakinomoto no Hitomaro Japanese poet 662 - 710
Kenneth Rexroth's translations, One Hundred Poems from the Japanese (1955), Aki yama no Momiji wo shigemi Mado inuru Imo wo motomenu Yama ji shirazu mo XXIII, p. 25

Harper Lee photo
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Jorge Luis Borges photo

„I think we Argentines can emulate Mohammed, can believe in the possibility of being Argentine without abounding in local color.“

—  Jorge Luis Borges Argentine short-story writer, essayist, poet and translator, and a key figure in Spanish language literature 1899 - 1986
Context: Some days past I have found a curious confirmation of the fact that what is truly native can and often does dispense with local color; I found this confirmation in Gibbon's Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire. Gibbon observes that in the Arabian book par excellence, in the Koran, there are no camels; I believe if there were any doubt as to the authenticity of the Koran, this absence of camels would be sufficient to prove it is an Arabian work. It was written by Mohammed, and Mohammed, as an Arab, had no reason to know that camels were especially Arabian; for him they were part of reality, he had no reason to emphasize them; on the other hand, the first thing a falsifier, a tourist, an Arab nationalist would do is have a surfeit of camels, caravans of camels, on every page; but Mohammed, as an Arab, was unconcerned: he knew he could be an Arab without camels. I think we Argentines can emulate Mohammed, can believe in the possibility of being Argentine without abounding in local color. "The Argentine Writer and Tradition", Fervor of Buenos Aires (1923)

David Levithan photo
Lois McMaster Bujold photo
Nelson Algren photo

„He was falling between glacial walls, he didn't know how anyone could fall so far away from everyone else in the world. So far to fall, so cold all the way, so steep and dark between those morphine-colored walls of [an addict]'s terrible pit.“

—  Nelson Algren, livro The Man with the Golden Arm
The Man with the Golden Arm (1949), Context: The clock in the room above the Safari told only Junkie Time. For every hour here was Old Junkie's Hour and the walls were the color of all old junkies' dreams: the hue of diluted morphine in the moment before the needle draws the suffering blood. / Walls that went up and up like walls in a troubled dream. Walls like water where no legend could be written and no hand grasp metal or wood. [... ] He was falling between glacial walls, he didn't know how anyone could fall so far away from everyone else in the world. So far to fall, so cold all the way, so steep and dark between those morphine-colored walls of [an addict]'s terrible pit. Frankie Machine above the Club Safari, where drug is sold.

„The immediate source of ecological crisis is capitalism… Capitalism is a cancer in the biosphere… I believe the color of radicalism today is not red, but green.“

—  Steve Chase American activist
Steve Chase, ed., Defending the Earth: A Dialogue Between Murray Bookchin and Dave Foreman(Boston South End Press, 1991, p 57-59); O'Leary, Richard. Environmental mafia: the enemy is us. pp. 41

Cormac McCarthy photo

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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