„Its very variety, subtlety, and utterly irrational, idiomatic complexity makes it possible to say things in English which simply cannot be said in any other language.“

—  Robert A. Heinlein, livro Stranger in a Strange Land

Fonte: Stranger in a Strange Land

Robert A. Heinlein photo
Robert A. Heinlein7
1907 - 1988

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„I realized that nature is filled with a limitless number of wonderful things which have causes and reasons like anything else but nonetheless cannot be forseen but must be discovered, for their subtlety and complexity transcends the present state of science.“

—  Robert B. Laughlin American physicist 1950

Nobel Prize autobiography (1998)
Contexto: I realized that nature is filled with a limitless number of wonderful things which have causes and reasons like anything else but nonetheless cannot be forseen but must be discovered, for their subtlety and complexity transcends the present state of science. The questions worth asking, in other words, come not from other people but from nature, and are for the most part delicate things easily drowned out by the noise of everyday life.

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„Two things alone remained to him in which he now put any trust: dogs and nature; an elk-hound and a rose bush. The world, in all its variety, life in all its complexity, had shrunk to that. Dogs and a bush were the whole of it.“

—  Virginia Woolf, livro Orlando: A Biography

Fonte: Orlando: A Biography (1928), Ch. 2
Contexto: At the age of thirty, or thereabouts, this young Nobleman had not only had every experience that life has to offer, but had seen the worthlessness of them all. Love and ambition, women and poets were all equally vain. Literature was a farce. The night after reading Greene's Visit to a Nobleman in the Country, he burnt in a great conflagration fifty-seven poetical works, only retaining 'The Oak Tree', which was his boyish dream and very short. Two things alone remained to him in which he now put any trust: dogs and nature; an elk-hound and a rose bush. The world, in all its variety, life in all its complexity, had shrunk to that. Dogs and a bush were the whole of it.

William Lai photo

„I will set a policy goal next year to make Taiwan a bilingual country, with English and Chinese being its official languages.“

—  William Lai Taiwanese politician 1959

William Lai (2018) cited in " Taiwan to Make English an Official Language https://www.breitbart.com/national-security/2018/08/31/taiwan-english-official-language/" on Breitbart, 31 August 2018.

„They are learned by the constant use of the language and cannot be taught in any other fashion.“

—  Richard Hamming American mathematician and information theorist 1915 - 1998

Methods of Mathematics Applied to Calculus, Probability, and Statistics (1985)
Contexto: Mathematics, being very different from the natural languages, has its corresponding patterns of thought. Learning these patterns is much more important than any particular result... They are learned by the constant use of the language and cannot be taught in any other fashion.

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„Drawing on my fine command of the English language, I said nothing.“

—  Robert Benchley American comedian 1889 - 1945

As quoted in With Truth as Our Sword (2005) by C E Sylvester, p. 205

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„We must include in any language with which we hope to describe complex data-processing situations the capability for describing data.“

—  Grace Hopper American computer scientist and United States Navy officer 1906 - 1992

As quoted in Management and the Computer of the Future (1962) by Sloan School of Management, p. 273
Contexto: We must include in any language with which we hope to describe complex data-processing situations the capability for describing data. We must also include a mechanism for determining the priorities to be applied to the data. These priorities are not fixed and are indicated in many cases by the data.
Thus we must have a language and a structure that will take care of the data descriptions and priorities, as well as the operations we wish to perform. If we think seriously about these problems, we find that we cannot work with procedures alone, since they are sequential. We need to define the problem instead of the procedures. The Language Structures Group of the Codasyl Committee has been studying the structure of languages that can be used to describe data-processing problems. The Group started out by trying to design a language for stating procedures, but soon discovered that what was really required was a description of the data and a statement of the relationships between the data sets. The Group has since begun writing an algebra of processes, the background for a theory of data processing.
Clearly, we must break away from the sequential and not limit the computers. We must state definitions and provide for priorities and descriptions of data. We must state relationships, not procedures.

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„It is mankind's discovery of language which more than any other single thing has separated him from the animal creation.“

—  Robertson Davies Canadian journalist, playwright, professor, critic, and novelist 1913 - 1995

On Seeing Plays (1990).
Contexto: It is mankind's discovery of language which more than any other single thing has separated him from the animal creation. Without language, what concept have we of past or future as separated from the immediate present? Without language, how can we tell anyone what we feel, or what we think? It might be said that until he developed language, man had no soul, for without language how could he reach deep inside himself and discover the truths that are hidden there, or find out what emotions he shared, or did not share, with his fellow men and women. But because this greatest gift of all gifts is in daily use, and is smeared, and battered and trivialized by commonplace associations, we too often forget the splendour of which it is capable, and the pleasures that it can give, from the pen of a master.

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„Mental space and its existence is what makes things like remote viewing possible. There shouldn’t be any limit to it.“

—  Alan Moore English writer primarily known for his work in comic books 1953

De Abaitua interview (1998)
Contexto: Mental space and its existence is what makes things like remote viewing possible. There shouldn’t be any limit to it. As I understand mental space, one of the differences between it and physical space, is that there is no space in it. All the distances are associative. In the real world, Land's End and John O’Groats are famously far apart. Yet you can’t say one without thinking of the other. In conceptual space they are right next to one another. Distances can only be associative, even vast interstellar distances shouldn’t be a problem. Time would also function like this.

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„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“