„Maybe my passion is nothing special, but at least it's mine.“

Tove Jansson photo
Tove Jansson
1914 - 2001
Publicidade

Citações relacionadas

George Gordon Byron photo
Albert Einstein photo

„I have no special talents. I am only passionately curious.“

—  Albert Einstein German-born physicist and founder of the theory of relativity 1879 - 1955
1950s, Ich habe keine besondere Begabung, sondern bin nur leidenschaftlich neugierig. Letter to Carl Seelig http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carl_Seelig (11 March 1952), Einstein Archives 39-013

Publicidade
François de La Rochefoucauld photo

„Of all violent passions, the least unbecoming to a woman is love.“

—  François de La Rochefoucauld French author of maxims and memoirs 1613 - 1680
Reflections; or Sentences and Moral Maxims (1665–1678), De toutes les passions violentes, celle qui sied le moins mal aux femmes, c'est l'amour. Maxim 466.

Jan Neruda photo
Donald J. Trump photo

„Without passion, you don't have energy; without energy, you have nothing. Nothing great in the world has been accomplished without passion.“

—  Donald J. Trump 45th President of the United States of America 1946
2000s, 2009, As quoted in Social Networking for Authors: Untapped Possibilities for Wealth (2009) by Michael Volkin, p. 60

Ralph Waldo Emerson photo

„The profoundest thought or passion sleeps as in a mine until an equal mind and heart finds and publishes it.“

—  Ralph Waldo Emerson American philosopher, essayist, and poet 1803 - 1882
1870s, Society and Solitude (1870), Quotation and Originality, Context: The profit of books is according to the sensibility of the reader. The profoundest thought or passion sleeps as in a mine until an equal mind and heart finds and publishes it.

Albert Einstein photo
Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel photo

„Nothing great in the world was accomplished without passion.“

—  Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel German philosopher 1770 - 1831
Lectures on the Philosophy of History (1832), Volume 1, Context: We assert then that nothing has been accomplished without interest on the part of the actors; and — if interest be called passion, inasmuch as the whole individuality, to the neglect of all other actual or possible interests and claims, is devoted to an object with every fibre of volition, concentrating all its desires and powers upon it — we may affirm absolutely that nothing great in the World has been accomplished without passion. Often abbreviated to: Nothing great in the World has been accomplished without passion. Variant translation: We may affirm absolutely that nothing great in the world has ever been accomplished without enthusiasm.

 Taliesin photo
R. Scott Bakker photo
Jonathan Edwards photo
Sydney Smith photo

„Nothing remains, under God, but those passions which have often proved“

—  Sydney Smith English writer and clergyman 1771 - 1845
Elementary Sketches of Moral Philosophy (1849), Context: The history of the world shows us that men are not to be counted by their numbers, but by the fire and vigour of their passions; by their deep sense of injury; by their memory of past glory; by their eagerness for fresh fame; by their clear and steady resolution of ceasing to live, or of achieving a particular object, which, when it is once formed, strikes off a load of manacles and chains, and gives free space to all heavenly and heroic feelings. All great and extraordinary actions come from the heart. There are seasons in human affairs, when qualities fit enough to conduct the common business of life, are feeble and useless; and when men must trust to emotion, for that safety which reason at such times can never give. These are the feelings which led the ten thousand over the Carduchian mountans; these are the feelings by which a handful of Greeks broke in pieces the power of Persia: they have, by turns, humbled Austria, reduced Spain; and in the fens of the Dutch, and on the mountains of the Swiss, defended the happiness, and revenged the oppressions, of man! God calls all the passions out in their keenness and vigour, for the present safety of mankind. Anger, and revenge, and the heroic mind, and a readiness to suffer;— all the secret strength, all the invisible array, of the feelings,— all that nature has reserved for the great scenes of the world. For the usual hopes, and the common aids of man, are all gone! Kings have perished, armies are subdued, nations mouldered away! Nothing remains, under God, but those passions which have often proved the best ministers of His vengeance, and the surest protectors of the world. Lecture XXVIL: On Habit - Part II, in “Elementary Sketches of Moral Philosophy”, delivered at The Royal Institution in the years 1804, 1805, and 1806 by the late Rev. Sydney Smith, M.A. (Spottiswoodes and Shaw (London: 1849)) http://www.archive.org/stream/elementarysketc03smitgoog#page/n438/mode/2up, p. 423-424 Another Variant: The history of the world shows us that men are not to be counted by their numbers, but by the fire and vigour of their passions; by their deep sense of injury; by their memory of past glory; by their eagerness for fresh fame; by their clear and steady resolution of ceasing to live, or of achieving a particular object, which, when it is once formed, strikes off a load of manacles and chains, and gives free space to all heavenly and heroic feelings. All great and extraordinary actions come from the heart. There are seasons in human affairs when qualities, fit enough to conduct the common business of life, are feeble and useless, when men must trust to emotion for that safety which reason at such times can never give. These are the feelings which led the ten thousand over the Carduchian mountains; these are the feelings by which a handful of Greeks broke in pieces the power of Persia; and in the fens of the Dutch, and on the mountains of the Swiss, defended the happiness and revenged the oppressions of man! God calls all the passions out in their keenness and vigour for the present safety of mankind, anger and revenge, and the heroic mind, and a readiness to suffer—all the secret strength, all the invisible array of the feelings—all that nature has reserved for the great scenes of the world. When the usual hopes and the common aids of man are all gone, nothing remains under God but those passions which have often proved the best ministers of His purpose and the surest protectors of the world. Quoted by Theodore Roosevelt in his " Brotherhood and the Heroic Virtues http://www.theodore-roosevelt.com/images/research/txtspeeches/668.pdf" Address at the Veterans' Reunion, Burlington, Vermont, September 5, 1901 and published in Theodore Roosevelt's "The Strenuous Life: Essays and Addresses" by Dover Publications (April 23, 2009) in its Dover Thrift Editions (ISBN: 978-0486472294), p. 126-127

Friedrich Nietzsche photo

„And nothing on earth consumes a man more quickly than the passion of resentment.“

—  Friedrich Nietzsche German philosopher, poet, composer, cultural critic, and classical philologist 1844 - 1900
Ecce Homo (1888), "Why I Am So Wise", 6

Charles Dickens photo

„Cows are my passion.“

—  Charles Dickens English writer and social critic and a Journalist 1812 - 1870
Dombey and Son (1846-1848), Ch. 21

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“