„Magic is dangerous - but love is more dangerous still“

—  Cassandra Clare, livro Anjo Mecânico

Fonte: Clockwork Angel

Última atualização 22 de Maio de 2020. História

Citações relacionadas

Francesca Lia Block photo
Chairil Anwar photo

„Love's a danger that quickly fades.“

—  Chairil Anwar Indonesian poet 1922 - 1949

"Tuti Artic" ["Tuti's Ice Cream"] (1947), p. 125
Original: (id) Cinta adalah bahaya yang lekas jadi pudar.

Jennifer Beals photo

„Love is the most dangerous thing in the world.“

—  Jennifer Beals American actress and a former teen model 1963

Interview at PlanetOut.com (2004) http://jennifer-beals.com/media/press/planet_out.html.

Keanu Reeves photo
Candace Bushnell photo
Laurell K. Hamilton photo
Jack Kerouac photo
Seth Grahame-Smith photo

„Of all the weapons in the world, love is the most dangerous.“

—  Seth Grahame-Smith, livro Pride and Prejudice and Zombies

Fonte: Pride and Prejudice and Zombies

George Gordon Byron photo
Daniel Johns photo

„Love me for my mind, because I'm a dangerous heart“

—  Daniel Johns Australian musician 1979

One Way Mule
Song lyrics, Diorama (2002)

Albert Camus photo

„Without beauty, love, or danger it would be almost easy to live.“

—  Albert Camus French author and journalist 1913 - 1960

Review of Nausea by Jean-Paul Sartre, published in the newspaper Alger Républicain (20 October 1938), p. 5; also quoted in Albert Camus and the Philosophy of the Absurd (2002) by Avi Sagi, p. 43
Contexto: It is the failing of a certain literature to believe that life is tragic because it is wretched.
Life can be magnificent and overwhelming — that is its whole tragedy. Without beauty, love, or danger it would be almost easy to live. And M. Sartre's hero does not perhaps give us the real meaning of his anguish when he insists on those aspects of man he finds repugnant, instead of basing his reasons for despair on certain of man's signs of greatness.
The realization that life is absurd cannot be an end, but only a beginning. This is a truth nearly all great minds have taken as their starting point. It is not this discovery that is interesting, but the consequences and rules of action drawn from it.

Silius Italicus photo

„Doubt not a woman's hardihood; no danger is too great for wedded love to face.“

—  Silius Italicus, Punica

Book III, lines 112–113
Punica
Original: (la) Crede vigori
femineo. Castum haud superat labor ullus amorem.

Jim Morrison photo

„Love hurts. Feelings are disturbing. People are taught that pain is evil and dangerous. How can they deal with love if they’re afraid to feel?“

—  Jim Morrison lead singer of The Doors 1943 - 1971

As quoted in Jim Morrison: Ten Years Gone (1981) by Lizzie James writing for Creem Magazine http://archives.waiting-forthe-sun.net/Pages/Interviews/JimInterviews/TenYearsGone.html
Contexto: People are afraid of themselves, of their own reality; their feelings most of all. People talk about how great love is, but that’s bullshit. Love hurts. Feelings are disturbing. People are taught that pain is evil and dangerous. How can they deal with love if they’re afraid to feel? Pain is meant to wake us up. People try to hide their pain. But they’re wrong. Pain is something to carry, like a radio. You feel your strength in the experience of pain. It’s all in how you carry it. That’s what matters. Pain is a feeling. Your feelings are a part of you. Your own reality. If you feel ashamed of them, and hide them, you’re letting society destroy your reality. You should stand up for your right to feel your pain.

Ann Brashares photo
Seth Grahame-Smith photo
Bertrand Russell photo

„People scarcely realize in imagination that the danger is to themselves and their children and their grandchildren, and not only to a dimly apprehended humanity. They can scarcely bring themselves to grasp that they, individually, and those whom they love are in imminent danger of perishing agonizingly.“

—  Bertrand Russell logician, one of the first analytic philosophers and political activist 1872 - 1970

1950s
Contexto: Here, then, is the problem which we present to you, stark and dreadful and inescapable: Shall we put an end to the human race; or shall mankind renounce war? People will not face this alternative because it is so difficult to abolish war.
The abolition of war will demand distasteful limitations of national sovereignty. But what perhaps impedes understanding of the situation more than anything else is that the term "mankind" feels vague and abstract. People scarcely realize in imagination that the danger is to themselves and their children and their grandchildren, and not only to a dimly apprehended humanity. They can scarcely bring themselves to grasp that they, individually, and those whom they love are in imminent danger of perishing agonizingly. And so they hope that perhaps war may be allowed to continue provided modern weapons are prohibited.
This hope is illusory. Whatever agreements not to use H-bombs had been reached in time of peace, they would no longer be considered binding in time of war, and both sides would set to work to manufacture H-bombs as soon as war broke out, for, if one side manufactured the bombs and the other did not, the side that manufactured them would inevitably be victorious.

Stendhal photo

„Were I to buy this life of pleasure and this only chance at happiness with a few little dangers, where would be the harm? And wouldn’t it still be fortunate to find a weak excuse to give her proof of my love?“

—  Stendhal, livro The Charterhouse of Parma

Quand je devrais acheter cette vie de délices et cette chance unique de bonheur par quelques petits dangers, où serait le mal? Et ne serait-ce pas encore un bonheur que de trouver ainsi une faible occasion de lui donner une preuve de mon amour?
Fonte: La Chartreuse de Parme (The Charterhouse of Parma) (1839), Ch. 20