„The more powerful the class, the more it claims not to exist.“

—  Guy Debord, La société du spectacle
Guy Debord photo
Guy Debord4
escritor, ensaísta e cineasta francês 1931 - 1994
Publicidade

Citações relacionadas

Thomas Robert Malthus photo

„There must therefore be a considerable class of persons who have both the will and power to consume more material wealth then they produce, or the mercantile classes could not continue profitably to produce so much more than they consume.“

—  Thomas Robert Malthus, Principles of Political Economy
Principles of Political Economy (Second Edition 1836), Context: But such consumption is not consistent with the actual habits of the generality of capitalists. The great object of their lives is to save a fortune, both because it is their duty to make a provision for their families, and because they cannot spend an income with so much comfort to themselves, while they are obliged perhaps to attend a counting house for seven or eight hours a day... ... There must therefore be a considerable class of persons who have both the will and power to consume more material wealth then they produce, or the mercantile classes could not continue profitably to produce so much more than they consume. Book II, Chapter I, On the Progress of Wealth, Section IX, p. 400 (See also: David Ricardo and aggregate demand)

Publicidade
Christopher Hitchens photo
Johann Hari photo
Robert A. Heinlein photo
George Bernard Shaw photo
Ada Lovelace photo

„God has not given to us (in this state of existence) more than very limited powers of expression of one's ideas and feelings“

—  Ada Lovelace English mathematician, considered the first computer programmer 1815 - 1852
Context: Circumstances have been such, that I have lived almost entirely secluded for some time. Those who are much in earnest and with single minds devoted to any great object in life, must find this occasionally inevitable.... You will wonder at having heard nothing from me; but you have experience and candour enough to perceive and know that God has not given to us (in this state of existence) more than very limited powers of expression of one's ideas and feelings... I shall be very desirous of again seeing you. You know what that means from me, and that it is no form, but the simple expression and result of the respect and attraction I feel for a mind that ventures to read direct in God's own book, and not merely thro' man's translation of that same vast and mighty work. In a letter to Andrew Crosse, as quoted in Eugen Kölbing's Englische Studien, Volume 19 https://archive.org/stream/englischestudien19leipuoft#page/157/mode/1up (1894), Leipzig; O.R. Reisland, "Byron's Daughter", p. 157.

„And nobody had more class than Melville.“

—  Ken Kesey novelist 1935 - 2001
The Paris Review interview (1994), Context: Kerouac had lots of class — stumbling drunk in the end, but read those last books. He never blames anybody else; he always blames himself. If there is a bad guy, it’s poor old drunk Jack, stumbling around. You never hear him railing at the government or railing at this or that. He likes trains, people, bums, cars. He just paints a wonderful picture of Norman Rockwell’s world. Of course it’s Norman Rockwell on a lot of dope. Jack London had class. He wasn’t a very good writer, but he had tremendous class. And nobody had more class than Melville. To do what he did in Moby-Dick, to tell a story and to risk putting so much material into it. If you could weigh a book, I don’t know any book that would be more full. It’s more full than War and Peace or The Brothers Karamazov. It has Saint Elmo’s fire, and great whales, and grand arguments between heroes, and secret passions. It risks wandering far, far out into the globe. Melville took on the whole world, saw it all in a vision, and risked everything in prose that sings. You have a sense from the very beginning that Melville had a vision in his mind of what this book was going to look like, and he trusted himself to follow it through all the way.

Emil M. Cioran photo
Warren Farrell photo

„No force is more powerful -- or more multiple -- than the family.“

—  Warren Farrell author, spokesperson, expert witness, political candidate 1943
Father and Child Reunion (2001), p. 246.

Wilhelm Liebknecht photo
Andrew Marshall photo
Kevin Kelly photo

„There is more to be gained by producing more opportunities than by optimizing existing ones.“

—  Kevin Kelly American author and editor 1952
Out of Control: The New Biology of Machines, Social Systems and the Economic World (1995), New Rules for the New Economy: 10 Radical Strategies for a Connected World (1999)

Terry Eagleton photo
Bertrand Russell photo

„Most people, at a crisis, feel more loyalty to their nation than to their class.“

—  Bertrand Russell logician, one of the first analytic philosophers and political activist 1872 - 1970
1930s, Power: A New Social Analysis (1938), Ch. 8: Economic Power

Lloyd Kenyon, 1st Baron Kenyon photo

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“