„One ever feels his twoness, -- an American, a Negro; two souls, two thoughts, two unreconciled strivings; two warring ideals in one dark body, whose strenth alone keeps it from being torn asunder.“

— W.E.B. Du Bois, Context: After the Egyptian and Indian, the Greek and Roman, the Teuton and Mongolian, the Negro is a sort of seventh son, born with a veil, and gifted with second-sight in this American world, — a world which yields him no true self-consciousness, but only lets him see himself through the revelation of the other world. It is a peculiar sensation, this double-consciousness, this sense of always looking at one's self through the eyes of others, of measuring one's soul by the tape of a world that looks on in amused contempt and pity. One ever feels his twoness, — an American, a Negro; two warring souls, two thoughts, two unreconciled strivings; two warring ideals in one dark body, whose dogged strength alone keeps it from being torn asunder.The history of the American Negro is the history of this strife, — this longing to attain self-conscious manhood, to merge his double self into a better and truer self. Ch. I: Of Our Spiritual Strivings
W.E.B. Du Bois photo
W.E.B. Du Bois
historiador, sociólogo, ativista e escritor americano 1868 - 1963
Publicidade

Citações relacionadas

„Two souls with but a single thought,
Two hearts that beat as one.“

— Eligius Franz Joseph von Münch-Bellinghausen
Der Sohn der Wildnis (1842), Act ii (published in English as Ingomar the Barbarian; translation by Maria Lovell), reported in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919). Compare: ""Two friends, two bodies with one soul inspir’d"", Alexander Pope, The Iliad of Homer, Book xvi, line 267.; ""’T was then we luvit ilk ither weel, ’T was then we twa did part: Sweet time—sad time! twa bairns at scule— Twa bairns and but ae heart"", William Motherwell, Jeannie Morrison (c. 1832), Stanza 3.

Publicidade
Fulton J. Sheen photo
John Keats photo
 Aristotle photo

„A friend is one soul abiding in two bodies.“

—  Aristotle Classical Greek philosopher, student of Plato and founder of Western philosophy -384 - -322 a.C.
p. 188; also reported in various sources as: Friendship is a single soul dwelling in two bodies. A true friend is one soul in two bodies. Love is composed of a single soul inhabiting two bodies. What is a friend? A single soul dwelling in two bodies.

Guillaume de Salluste Du Bartas photo

„Two souls in one, two hearts into one heart.“

— Guillaume de Salluste Du Bartas French writer 1544 - 1590
First Week, Sixth Day. Compare: "Two friends, two bodies with one soul inspir'd", Alexander Pope, The Iliad of Homer, Book xvi, line 267.

Percy Bysshe Shelley photo

„Are ye, two vultures sick for battle,
Two scorpions under one wet stone,
Two bloodless wolves whose dry throats rattle,
Two crows perched on the murrained cattle,
Two vipers tangled into one.“

— Percy Bysshe Shelley English Romantic poet 1792 - 1822
Similes for Two Political Characters of 1819 http://etext.library.adelaide.edu.au/s/shelley/percy_bysshe/s54cp/section163.html (Published 1832), st. 4

Diogenes Laërtius photo
Publicidade
Jasper Fforde photo
Erich Fromm photo

„In love the paradox occurs that two beings become one and yet remain two.“

— Erich Fromm German social psychologist and psychoanalyst 1900 - 1980

Virginia Woolf photo
Publicidade
 Aristotle photo

„What is a friend? A single soul dwelling in two bodies.“

—  Aristotle Classical Greek philosopher, student of Plato and founder of Western philosophy -384 - -322 a.C.

E.E. Cummings photo
Bruce Lee photo
Abraham Lincoln photo

„If two men are adrift at sea on a plank which will bear up but one, the law justifies either in pushing the other off. I never had to struggle to keep a negro from enslaving me, nor did a negro ever have to fight to keep me from enslaving him.“

— Abraham Lincoln 16th President of the United States 1809 - 1865
Context: The proposition that there is a struggle between the white man and the negro contains a falsehood. There is no struggle. If there was, I should be for the white man. If two men are adrift at sea on a plank which will bear up but one, the law justifies either in pushing the other off. I never had to struggle to keep a negro from enslaving me, nor did a negro ever have to fight to keep me from enslaving him. They say, between the crocodile and the negro they go for the negro. The logical proportion is therefore; as a white man is to a negro, so is a negro to a crocodile; or, as the negro may treat the crocodile, so the white man may treat the negro. The 'don't care' policy leads just as surely to nationalizing slavery as Jeff Davis himself, but the doctrine is more dangerous because more insidious.

Próximo