„I have a lot of work to do today;
I need to slaughter memory,
Turn my living soul to stone
Then teach myself to live again.“

Anna Akhmatova photo
Anna Akhmatova2
1889 - 1966
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Anna Akhmatova photo

„Today I have so much to do:
I must kill memory once and for all,
I must turn my soul to stone,
I must learn to live again—
Unless ...“

— Anna Akhmatova Russian modernist poet 1889 - 1966
Context: Today I have so much to do: I must kill memory once and for all, I must turn my soul to stone, I must learn to live again— Unless... Summer's ardent rustling Is like a festival outside my window. Translated by Judith Hemschemeyer from Complete Poems of Anna Akhmatova (1989)

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 Geronimo photo

„I will protect my people if I live. For myself I do not fear for I have the word of Usen.“

—  Geronimo leader of the Bedonkohe Apache 1829 - 1909
Context: I will protect my people if I live. For myself I do not fear for I have the word of Usen. Who is the White Nantan to think he can pit his power against that of Usen? On being informed that there were authorizations to kill him while he was a prisoner in San Antonio, prior to news of further instructions to transport him to Florida, as quoted in Geronimo and the End of the Apache Wars (1990), by Charles Leland Sonnichsen, p. 102; "Usen" is the Apache word for God, and "Nantan" their word for a leader, spokesman, or "chief".

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Tao Yuanming photo

„Long I lived checked by the bars of a cage;
Now I have turned again to Nature and Freedom.“

— Tao Yuanming Chinese poet 365 - 427
Context: When I was young, I was out of tune with the herd, [[File:Chen Hongshou Portrait von Tao-Qian. JPG|thumb|Long I lived checked by the bars of a cage; Now I have turned again to Nature and Freedom. ]] My only love was for the hills and mountains. Unwitting I fell into the Web of World's dust, And was not free until my thirtieth year. The migrant bird longs for the old wood; The fish in the tank thinks of its native pool. I had rescued from wildness a patch of the Southern Moor And, still rustic, I returned to field and garden. My ground covers no more than ten acres; My thatched cottage has eight or nine rooms. Elms and willows cluster by the eaves; Peach trees and plum trees grow before the Hall. Hazy, hazy the distant hamlets of men; Steady the smoke that hangs over cottage roofs. A dog barks somewhere in the deep lanes, A cock crows at the top of the mulberry tree. At gate and courtyard—no murmur of the World's dust; In the empty rooms—leisure and deep stillness. Long I lived checked by the bars of a cage; Now I have turned again to Nature and Freedom. "Returning to the Fields" Arthur Waley, Translations from the Chinese (1941), p. 90 Variant translation: Young I was witless in the world's affairs, My nature wildness and hills prefers; By mishap fallen into mundane snares, Once I had left I wasted thirty years. Birds in the cage long for their wonted woods, Fish in the pool for former rivers yearn. I clear the wildness that stretches south, Hiding my defects homeward I return. Ten acres built with scattered house square, Beside the thatched huts eight or nine in all; The elms and willows shade the hindmost eaves, While peach and pear-trees spread before the hall. While smoke form nearby huts hangs in the breeze; A dog is barking in the alley deep; A cock crows from the chump of mulberry trees. Within my courtyard all is clear of dust, Where tranquil in my leisure I remain. Long have I been imprisoned in the cage; Now back to Nature I return again. "Returning to my Farm Young" (translation by Andrew Boyd)

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„I must remember the things I have seen. I must keep them fresh in memory, see them again in my mind's eye, live through them again and again in my thoughts. And most of all, I must make good use of them in tomorrow's life.“

— Thomas Anthony Dooley III American physician 1927 - 1961
Deliver Us From Evil (1956); recounting Dooley's life-changing experience in 1954, while in the Navy and stationed in Vietnam evacuating anti-Communist refugees, observing the misery of the people.

Henry James photo

„If I were to live my life over again, I would be an American. I would steep myself in America, I would know no other land.“

— Henry James American novelist, short story author, and literary critic 1843 - 1916
Said to Hamlin Garland in 1906 and quoted by Garland in Roadside Meetings (1930; reprinted by Kessinger Publishing, 2005, , ch. XXXVI: Henry James at Rye (p. 461).

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