„The secret self knows the anguish of our attachments and assures us that letting go of what we think we must have to be happy is the same as letting go of our unhappiness.“

—  Guy Finley

Guy Finley photo
Guy Finley23
American self-help writer, philosopher, and spiritual teach… 1949

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„Only when we let go of attachment can we let go of the self. Free ourselves from worries. If we are constantly troubled by worries, it must be that we think too highly of ourselves.“

—  Jun Hong Lu Australian Buddhist leader 1959

Quotes from Word of Wisdoms Vol.3
Original: (zh_Hant) 放下執著,才能破除我執。 我們做人不能有煩惱, 有煩惱的人一定是把自己 看得太大、太高了。

Ralph Smart photo
Sherrilyn Kenyon photo
Artemus Ward photo

„Let us all be happy and live within our means, even if we have to borrer [sic] money to do it with.“

—  Artemus Ward American writer 1834 - 1867

Science and Natural History, Letter VII http://books.google.com/books?id=DYdEAAAAcAAJ&q=%22let+us+all+be%22+%22and+live+within+our+means,+even+if+we+have+to+borrer+money+to+do+it+with%22&pg=PA165#v=onepage to Punch, part of the Artemus Ward in London series (22 October 1866).

Thich Nhat Hanh photo
François de La Rochefoucauld photo

„It is a kind of happiness to know how unhappy we must be.“

—  François de La Rochefoucauld French author of maxims and memoirs 1613 - 1680

C’est une espèce de bonheur, de connaître jusqu’à quel point on doit être malheureux.
Maxim 8 of the Maximes supprimées.
Later Additions to the Maxims

„I think many of us go through our life not fully having permission to be who we are and what we're going to become.“

—  Martin de Maat American theatre director 1949 - 2001

Contexto: I think many of us go through our life not fully having permission to be who we are and what we're going to become. Most of us are often looking for approval. We hate it when we're not approved of. It's that approval that has us in our minds worrying about what we're doing as we're doing it, trying to figure out whether or not it's appropriate or will be accepted. We walk through our lives like we're on our first date. Trying to see if we're appropriate and trying not to step on other peoples' toes... you know, cautiously, prophylactically, for fear of not being approved of. In this work, there's only approval.

William Hazlitt photo

„Books let us into their souls and lay open to us the secrets of our own.“

—  William Hazlitt English writer 1778 - 1830

"The Sick Chamber," The New Monthly Magazine (August 1830), reprinted in Essays of William Hazlitt, selected and edited by Frank Carr (London, 1889)
Fonte: Essays of William Hazlitt: Selected and Edited, with Introduction and Notes, by Frank Carr

Daniel Handler photo
Thich Nhat Hanh photo
Augusto Boal photo

„Let us hope that one day – please, not too far in the future – we’ll be able to convince or force our governments, our leaders, to do the same; to ask their audiences – us – what they should do, so as to make this world a place to live and be happy in – yes, it is possible – rather than just a vast market in which we sell our goods and our souls. Let’s hope. Let’s work for it!“

—  Augusto Boal Brazilian writer 1931 - 2009

Games for Actors and non-Actors (1992)
Contexto: In truth the Theatre of the Oppressed has no end, because everything which happens in it must extend into life…. The Theatre of the Oppressed is located precisely on the frontier between fiction and reality – and this border must be crossed. If the show starts in fiction, its objective is to become integrated into reality, into life. Now in 1992, when so many certainties have become so many doubts, when so many dreams have withered on exposure to sunlight, and so many hopes have become as many deceptions – now that we are living through times and situations of great perplexity, full of doubts and uncertainties, now more than ever I believe it is time for a theatre which, at its best, will ask the right questions at the right times. Let us be democratic and ask our audiences to tell us their desires, and let us show them alternatives. Let us hope that one day – please, not too far in the future – we’ll be able to convince or force our governments, our leaders, to do the same; to ask their audiences – us – what they should do, so as to make this world a place to live and be happy in – yes, it is possible – rather than just a vast market in which we sell our goods and our souls. Let’s hope. Let’s work for it!

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Hillary Clinton photo
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Maurice Maeterlinck photo

„It is childish to talk of happiness and unhappiness where infinity is in question. The idea which we entertain of happiness and unhappiness is something so special, so human, so fragile that it does not exceed our stature and falls to dust as soon as we go beyond its little sphere.“

—  Maurice Maeterlinck Belgian playwright, poet, and essayist 1862 - 1949

Death (1912)
Contexto: It is childish to talk of happiness and unhappiness where infinity is in question. The idea which we entertain of happiness and unhappiness is something so special, so human, so fragile that it does not exceed our stature and falls to dust as soon as we go beyond its little sphere. It proceeds entirely from a few accidents of our nerves, which are made to appreciate very slight happenings, but which could as easily have felt everything the reverse way and taken pleasure in that which is now pain. We believe that we see nothing hanging over us but catastrophes, deaths, torments and disasters; we shiver at the mere thought of the great interplanetary spaces, with their cold and formidable and gloomy solitudes; and we imagine that the revolving worlds are as unhappy as ourselves because they freeze, or clash together, or are consumed in unutterable flames. We infer from this that the genius of the universe is an outrageous tyrant, seized with a monstrous madness, and that it delights only in the torture of itself and all that it contains. To millions of stars, each many thousand times larger than our sun, to nebulee whose nature and dimensions no figure, no word in our languages is able to express, we attribute our momentary sensibility, the little ephemeral and chance working of our nerves; and we are convinced that life there must be impossible or appalling, because we should feel too hot or too cold. It were much wiser to say to ourselves that it would need but a trifle, a few papilla more or less to our skin, the slightest modification of our eyes and ears, to turn the temperature, the silence and the darkness of space into a delicious spring-time, an unequalled music, a divine light. It were much more reasonable to persuade ourselves that the catastrophes which we think that we behold are life itself, the joy and one or other of those immense festivals of mind and matter in which death, thrusting aside at last our two enemies, time and space, will soon permit us to take part. Each world dissolving, extinguished, crumbling, burnt or colliding with another world and pulverized means the commencement of a magnificent experiment, the dawn of a marvelous hope and perhaps an unexpected happiness drawn direct from the inexhaustible unknown. What though they freeze or flame, collect or disperse, pursue or flee one another: mind and matter, no longer united by the same pitiful hazard that joined them in us, must rejoice at all that happens; for all is but birth and re-birth, a departure into an unknown filled with wonderful promises and maybe an anticipation of some unutterable event …
And, should they stand still one day, become fixed and remain motionless, it will not be that they have encountered calamity, nullity or death; but they will have entered into a thing so fair, so great, so happy and bathed in such certainties that they will for ever prefer it to all the prodigious chances of an infinity which nothing can impoverish.

Leo Buscaglia photo
Laurell K. Hamilton photo
Orson Scott Card photo
Joel Osteen photo

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