„Tis very strange Men should be so fond of being thought wickeder than they are.“

—  Daniel Defoe, A System of Magick (1726).
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Daniel Defoe13
escritor inglês conhecido pela sua obra "Robinson Crusoé" 1660 - 1731

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„It is very strange that men should deny a creator and yet attribute to themselves the power of creating eels.“

—  Voltaire French writer, historian, and philosopher 1694 - 1778
Citas, From the Philosophic Dictionary, as quoted in The life of Pasteur http://archive.org/stream/scienceandscient029493mbp/scienceandscient029493mbp_djvu.txt (1902)

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„So strange is Chance, so blind the purposes of men!“

—  Statius, livro Thebaid
Thebaid, Book V, Pro fors et caeca futuri mens hominum! Line 718 (tr. J. H. Mozley)

John Jay photo

„Among the strange things of this world, nothing seems more strange than that men pursuing happiness should knowingly quit the right and take a wrong road, and frequently do what their judgments neither approve nor prefer.“

—  John Jay American politician and a founding father of the United States 1745 - 1829
1770s, Letter to Lindley Murray (1774), Context: Among the strange things of this world, nothing seems more strange than that men pursuing happiness should knowingly quit the right and take a wrong road, and frequently do what their judgments neither approve nor prefer. Yet so is the fact; and this fact points strongly to the necessity of our being healed, or restored, or regenerated by a power more energetic than any of those which properly belong to the human mind. We perceive that a great breach has been made in the moral and physical systems by the introduction of moral and physical evil; how or why, we know not; so, however, it is, and it certainly seems proper that this breach should be closed and order restored. For this purpose only one adequate plan has ever appeared in the world, and that is the Christian dispensation. In this plan I have full faith. Man, in his present state, appears to be a degraded creature; his best gold is mixed with dross, and his best motives are very far from being pure and free from earth and impurity. Letter to (22 August 1774), as published in The Life of John Jay (1833) by William Jay, Vol. 2, p. 345.

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George Savile, 1st Marquess of Halifax photo

„If Men considered how many Things there are that Riches cannot buy, they would not be so fond of them.“

—  George Savile, 1st Marquess of Halifax English politician 1633 - 1695
Political, Moral, and Miscellaneous Reflections (1750), Moral Thoughts and Reflections

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„THAT some desperate wretches should be willing to steal and enslave men by violence and murder for gain, is rather lamentable than strange. But that many civilized, nay, christianized people should approve, and be concerned in the savage practice, is surprising“

—  Thomas Paine English and American political activist 1737 - 1809
1770s, African Slavery in America (March 1775), Context: TO AMERICANS. THAT some desperate wretches should be willing to steal and enslave men by violence and murder for gain, is rather lamentable than strange. But that many civilized, nay, christianized people should approve, and be concerned in the savage practice, is surprising; and still persist, though it has been so often proved contrary to the light of nature, to every principle of Justice and Humanity, and even good policy, by a succession of eminent men, and several late publications.

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William Shakespeare photo

„However wickedness outstrips men, it has no wings to fly from God.“

—  William Shakespeare English playwright and poet 1564 - 1616
Misattributed, Derived from a longer quote in Henry V, reported in Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895), p. 283.

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„Associate yourself with Men of good Quality if you Esteem your own Reputation; for 'tis better to be alone than in bad Company.“

—  George Washington first President of the United States 1732 - 1799
Misattributed, This is from a set of maxims which Washington copied out in his own hand as a school-boy: "Rules of Civility and Decent Behaviour in Company and Conversation http://gwpapers.virginia.edu/documents/the-rules-of-civility/" Rule # 56 written out by Washington ca. 1744: : These maxims originated in the late sixteenth century in France and were popularly circulated during Washington's time. Washington wrote out a copy of the 110 Rules in his school book when he was about sixteen-years old... During the days before mere hero worship had given place to understanding and comprehension of the fineness of Washington's character, of his powerful influence among men, and of the epoch-making nature of the issues he so largely shaped, it was assumed that Washington himself composed the maxims, or at least that he compiled them. It is a satisfaction to find that his consideration for others, his respect for and deference to those deserving such treatment, his care of his own body and tongue, and even his reverence for his Maker, all were early inculcated in him by precepts which were the common practice in decent society the world over. These very maxims had been in use in France for a century and a half, and in England for a century, before they were set as a task for the schoolboy Washington. :* Charles Moore in his Introduction to George Washington's Rules of Civility and Decent Behaviour in Company and Conversation (1926) http://gwpapers.virginia.edu/documents/civility/index.html, edited by Charles Moore, xi-xv

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„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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