„A distinguished diplomat could hold his tongue in ten languages. “

Última atualização 5 de Janeiro de 2019. História
Henry Wotton photo
Henry Wotton1
1568 - 1639

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Publilio Siro photo

„Let a fool hold his tongue and he will pass for a sage.“

—  Publilio Siro Latin writer

Maxim 914
Sentences
Original: (la) Taciturnitas stulto homini pro sapientia est.

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Richard Wright photo

„We shared a common tongue, but my language was a different language from theirs.“

—  Richard Wright, livro Black Boy

Black Boy (1945)
Contexto: All my life I have done nothing but feel and cultivate my feelings; all their lives they had done nothing but strive for petty goals, the trivial material prizes of American life. We shared a common tongue, but my language was a different language from theirs.

William Cowper photo
Rudyard Kipling photo
Karl Marx photo

„In like manner, the beginner who has learned a new language always translates it back into his mother tongue, but he assimilates the spirit of the new language and expresses himself freely in it only when he moves in it without recalling the old and when he forgets his native tongue.“

—  Karl Marx German philosopher, economist, sociologist, journalist and revolutionary socialist 1818 - 1883

The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte (1852)
Contexto: Men make their own history, but they do not make it as they please; they do not make it under self-selected circumstances, but under circumstances existing already, given and transmitted from the past. The tradition of all dead generations weighs like a nightmare on the brains of the living. And just as they seem to be occupied with revolutionizing themselves and things, creating something that did not exist before, precisely in such epochs of revolutionary crisis they anxiously conjure up the spirits of the past to their service, borrowing from them names, battle slogans, and costumes in order to present this new scene in world history in time-honored disguise and borrowed language. Thus Luther put on the mask of the Apostle Paul, the Revolution of 1789-1814 draped itself alternately in the guise of the Roman Republic and the Roman Empire, and the Revolution of 1848 knew nothing better to do than to parody, now 1789, now the revolutionary tradition of 1793-95. In like manner, the beginner who has learned a new language always translates it back into his mother tongue, but he assimilates the spirit of the new language and expresses himself freely in it only when he moves in it without recalling the old and when he forgets his native tongue.
When we think about this conjuring up of the dead of world history, a salient difference reveals itself. Camille Desmoulins, Danton, Robespierre, St. Just, Napoleon, the heroes as well as the parties and the masses of the old French Revolution, performed the task of their time – that of unchaining and establishing modern bourgeois society – in Roman costumes and with Roman phrases.

Thomas Fuller (writer) photo

„1953. Learn the art of Silence; the wise Man that holds his Tongue, says more than the Fool who speaks.“

—  Thomas Fuller (writer) British physician, preacher, and intellectual 1654 - 1734

Introductio ad prudentiam: Part II (1727)

Chrétien de Troyes photo
Bob Dylan photo

„I saw ten thousand talkers whose tongues were all broken.“

—  Bob Dylan American singer-songwriter, musician, author, and artist 1941

Song lyrics, A Hard Rain's a-Gonna Fall

Ronald Reagan photo

„The ten most dangerous words in the English language are "Hi, I'm from the government, and I'm here to help."“

—  Ronald Reagan American politician, 40th president of the United States (in office from 1981 to 1989) 1911 - 2004

Remarks to Future Farmers of America http://www.reagan.utexas.edu/archives/speeches/1988/072888c.htm (28 July 1988)
1980s, Second term of office (1985–1989)

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Sam Ervin photo

„Because I can understand the English language. It is my mother tongue.“

—  Sam Ervin Democratic United States Senator from North Carolina 1896 - 1985

instant reply to Mr. Ehrlichman asking, "How do you know that, Mr. Chairman?" after Senator Ervin insisted that 18 USC 2511 on foreign intelligence would not allow the President of the United States to authorize a burglary to obtain the opinion of Ellsberg's psychiatrist about his intellectual or emotional or psychological state, as claimed by Ehrlichman. Tuesday, July 24, 1973. * 1973
Presidential Campaign Activities of 1972, Watergate and Related Activities, Phase I: Watergate Investigation
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U.S. Government Printing Office
2576
https://www.maryferrell.org/showDoc.html?docId=144958&relPageId=362&search=mother_tongue
2017-05-13

Anthony Burgess photo
David Lange photo

„He had more on his mind than his mind could hold.“

—  David Lange New Zealand politician and 32nd Prime Minister of New Zealand 1942 - 2005

Referring to an unsuitable applicant for a high-ranking government position.
Fonte: A New Zealand Dictionary of Political Quotations, p. 94.

George Sand photo

„He made a single instrument speak a language of infinity. He could often sum up, in ten lines that a child could play, poems of a boundless exaltation, dramas of unequalled power.“

—  George Sand French novelist and memoirist; pseudonym of Lucile Aurore Dupin 1804 - 1876

On Chopin's Preludes in Histoire de Ma Vie (1902-04), Vo. IV, p. 439
Contexto: It was there he composed these most beautiful of short pages which he modestly entitled the Preludes. They are masterpieces. Several bring to mind visions of deceased monks and the sound of funeral chants; others are melancholy and fragrant; they came to him in times of sun and health, in the clamor of laughing children under he window, the faraway sound of guitars, birdsongs from the moist leaves, in the sight of the small pale roses coming in bloom on the snow. … Still others are of a mournful sadness, and while charming your ear, they break your heart. There is one that came to him through an evening of dismal rain — it casts the soul into a terrible dejection. Maurice and I had left him in good health one morning to go shopping in Palma for things we needed at out "encampment." The rain came in overflowing torrents. We made three leagues in six hours, only to return in the middle of a flood. We got back in absolute dark, shoeless, having been abandoned by our driver to cross unheard of perils. We hurried, knowing how our sick one would worry. Indeed he had, but now was as though congealed in a kind of quiet desperation, and, weeping, he was playing his wonderful Prelude. Seeing us come in, he got up with a cry, then said with a bewildered air and a strange tone, "Ah, I was sure that you were dead." When he recovered his spirits and saw the state we were in, he was ill, picturing the dangers we had been through, but he confessed to me that while waiting for us he had seen it all in a dream, and no longer distinguished the dream from reality, he became calm and drowsy while playing the piano, persuaded that he was dead himself. He saw himself drowned in a lake. Heavy drops of icy water fell in a regular rhythm on his breast, and when I made him listen to the sound of the drops of water indeed falling in rhythm on the roof, he denied having heard it. He was even angry that I should intepret this in terms of imitative sounds. He protested with all his might — and he was right to — against the childishness of such aural imitations. His genius was filled with the mysterious sounds of nature, but transformed into sublime equivalents in musical thought, and not through slavish imitation of the actual external sounds. His composition of that night was surely filled with raindrops, resounding clearly on the tiles of the Charterhouse, but it had been transformed in his imagination and in his song into tears falling upon his heart from the sky. … The gift of Chopin is [the expression of] the deepest and fullest feelings and emotions that have ever existed. He made a single instrument speak a language of infinity. He could often sum up, in ten lines that a child could play, poems of a boundless exaltation, dramas of unequalled power.