„The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good.“

Ann Landers photo
Ann Landers3
1918 - 2002
Publicidade

Citações relacionadas

Philip K. Dick photo
Byron Katie photo
Publicidade
John Flanagan photo
Isabel II do Reino Unido photo

„The true measure of all our actions is how long the good in them lasts... everything we do, we do for the young.“

—  Isabel II do Reino Unido queen of the UK, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand, and head of the Commonwealth of Nations 1926
Speech during the commemorations of D-Day, 06/06/2014. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/history/world-war-two/10883074/D-Day-anniversary-Queen-stirred-by-commemorations.html

Publicidade
Stephen R. Covey photo
Paul McCartney photo
Cassandra Clare photo
Publicidade
Immanuel Kant photo

„When I treat a man contemptuously, I can inspire him with no practical desire to appreciate my grounds of truth. When I treat any one as worthless, I can inspire him with no desire to do right.“

—  Immanuel Kant German philosopher 1724 - 1804
Context: The more one presupposes that his own power will suffice him to realize what he desires the more practical is that desire. When I treat a man contemptuously, I can inspire him with no practical desire to appreciate my grounds of truth. When I treat any one as worthless, I can inspire him with no desire to do right. Part III : Selection on Education from Kant's other Writings, Ch. I Pedagogical Fragments, # 15

George MacDonald photo

„If he be not a true man, he will draw evil out of the best; we need not mind how he treats any work of art! If he be a true man, he will imagine true things: what matter whether I meant them or not?“

—  George MacDonald Scottish journalist, novelist 1824 - 1905
Context: "But a man may then imagine in your work what he pleases, what you never meant!"  Not what he pleases, but what he can. If he be not a true man, he will draw evil out of the best; we need not mind how he treats any work of art! If he be a true man, he will imagine true things: what matter whether I meant them or not? They are there none the less that I cannot claim putting them there! One difference between God's work and man's is, that, while God's work cannot mean more than he meant, man's must mean more than he meant. For in everything that God has made, there is layer upon layer of ascending significance; also he expresses the same thought in higher and higher kinds of that thought: it is God's things, his embodied thoughts, which alone a man has to use, modified and adapted to his own purposes, for the expression of his thoughts; therefore he cannot help his words and figures falling into such combinations in the mind of another as he had himself not foreseen, so many are the thoughts allied to every other thought, so many are the relations involved in every figure, so many the facts hinted in every symbol. A man may well himself discover truth in what he wrote; for he was dealing all the time with things that came from thoughts beyond his own.

Don Soderquist photo

„“How you treat everyone you encounter is the measure of the genuineness of your respect—and the heights you can each as a leader.”“

—  Don Soderquist 1934 - 2016
Don Soderquist “ Live Learn Lead to Make a Difference https://books.google.com/books?id=s0q7mZf9oDkC&lpg=pg=PP1&dq=Don%20Soderquist&pg=PP1#v=onepage&q&f=false, Thomas Nelson, April 2006 p. 135.

Oscar Wilde photo
Publicidade
Peter F. Drucker photo
Publicidade
Orson Scott Card photo
John Locke photo

„The sooner you treat him as a man, the sooner he will begin to be one“

—  John Locke English philosopher and physician 1632 - 1704
Context: A father would do well, as his son grows up, and is capable of it, to talk familiarly with him; nay, ask his advice, and consult with him about those things wherein he has any knowledge or understanding. By this, the father will gain two things, both of great moment. The sooner you treat him as a man, the sooner he will begin to be one; and if you admit him into serious discourses sometimes with you, you will insensibly raise his mind above the usual amusements of youth, and those trifling occupations which it is commonly wasted in. For it is easy to observe, that many young men continue longer in thought and conversation of school-boys than otherwise they would, because their parents keep them at that distance, and in that low rank, by all their carriage to them. Sec. 95

Próximo