„You are a den of vipers and thieves. I have determined to rout you out, and by the Eternal,“

—  Andrew Jackson, 1830s, Context: Gentlemen! I too have been a close observer of the doings of the Bank of the United States. I have had men watching you for a long time, and am convinced that you have used the funds of the bank to speculate in the breadstuffs of the country. When you won, you divided the profits amongst you, and when you lost, you charged it to the bank. You tell me that if I take the deposits from the bank and annul its charter I shall ruin ten thousand families. That may be true, gentlemen, but that is your sin! Should I let you go on, you will ruin fifty thousand families, and that would be my sin! You are a den of vipers and thieves. I have determined to rout you out, and by the Eternal, (bringing his fist down on the table) I will rout you out! From the original minutes of the Philadelphia committee of citizens sent to meet with President Jackson (February 1834), according to Andrew Jackson and the Bank of the United States (1928) by Stan V. Henkels - online PDF http://kenhirsch.net/money/AndrewJacksonAndTheBankHenkels.pdf
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Andrew Jackson4
1767 - 1845
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„Surely you never will tamely suffer this country to be a den of thieves.“

—  John Hancock American Patriot and statesman during the American Revolution (1737–1793) 1737 - 1793
Boston Massacre Oration (1774), Context: Surely you never will tamely suffer this country to be a den of thieves. Remember, my friends, from whom you sprang. Let not a meanness of spirit, unknown to those whom you boast of as your fathers, excite a thought to the dishonor of your mothers I conjure you, by all that is dear, by all that is honorable, by all that is sacred, not only that ye pray, but that ye act; that, if necessary, ye fight, and even die, for the prosperity of our Jerusalem. Break in sunder, with noble disdain, the bonds with which the Philistines have bound you. Suffer not yourselves to be betrayed, by the soft arts of luxury and effeminacy, into the pit digged for your destruction. Despise the glare of wealth. That people who pay greater respect to a wealthy villain than to an honest, upright man in poverty, almost deserve to be enslaved; they plainly show that wealth, however it may be acquired, is, in their esteem, to be preferred to virtue.

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„What hurts society is not that it should lose its property, but that it should become a den of thieves, for then it must cease to be society.“

—  William Kingdon Clifford English mathematician and philosopher 1845 - 1879
The Ethics of Belief (1877), The Duty of Inquiry, Context: A bad action is always bad at the time when it is done, no matter what happens afterwards. Every time we let ourselves believe for unworthy reasons, we weaken our powers of self-control, of doubting, of judicially and fairly weighing evidence. We all suffer severely enough from the maintenance and support of false beliefs and the fatally wrong actions which they lead to, and the evil born when one such belief is entertained is great and wide. But a greater and wider evil arises when the credulous character is maintained and supported, when a habit of believing for unworthy reasons is fostered and made permanent. If I steal money from any person, there may be no harm done from the mere transfer of possession; he may not feel the loss, or it may prevent him from using the money badly. But I cannot help doing this great wrong towards Man, that I make myself dishonest. What hurts society is not that it should lose its property, but that it should become a den of thieves, for then it must cease to be society. This is why we ought not to do evil, that good may come; for at any rate this great evil has come, that we have done evil and are made wicked thereby. In like manner, if I let myself believe anything on insufficient evidence, there may be no great harm done by the mere belief; it may be true after all, or I may never have occasion to exhibit it in outward acts. But I cannot help doing this great wrong towards Man, that I make myself credulous. The danger to society is not merely that it should believe wrong things, though that is great enough; but that it should become credulous, and lose the habit of testing things and inquiring into them; for then it must sink back into savagery.

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„If you don’t have to change routes, why should you change guides?“

—  Antonio Porchia Italian Argentinian poet 1886 - 1968
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„We may not stop until we have done our part to fashion a world in which there shall be some share of fellowship; which shall be better than a den of thieves.“

—  Learned Hand American legal scholar, Court of Appeals judge 1872 - 1961
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„We have shared out, like thieves, the amazing treasures of days and nights.“

—  Jorge Luis Borges Argentine short-story writer, essayist, poet and translator, and a key figure in Spanish language literature 1899 - 1986

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„Soldiers for equality, uh? Glad you warned me. I’d have thought you were just thieves.“

—  Gregory Benford Science fiction author and astrophysicist 1941
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„[Footnote:] We have no Common Vipers in the United States, but we have worse.“

—  Will Cuppy American writer 1884 - 1949
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„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“