„The clash of civilizations will dominate global politics. The fault lines between civilizations will be the battle lines of the future.“

—  Samuel P. Huntington, The Clash of Civilizations?

"The Clash of Civilizations?," in Foreign Affairs (1993)
Contexto: It is my hypothesis that the fundamental source of conflict in this new world will not be primarily ideological or primarily economic. The great divisions among humankind and the dominating source of conflict will be cultural. Nation-states will remain the most powerful actors in world affairs, but the principal conflicts of global politics will occur between nations and groups of different civilizations. The clash of civilizations will dominate global politics. The fault lines between civilizations will be the battle lines of the future.

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Samuel P. Huntington photo

„The futures of both peace and Civilization depend upon understanding and cooperation among the political, spiritual, and intellectual leaders of the world’s major civilizations.“

—  Samuel P. Huntington American political scientist 1927 - 2008

Ch. 12 : The West, Civilizations, and Civilization, § 4 : The Commonalities Of Civilization, p. 321
The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order (1996)
Contexto: The futures of both peace and Civilization depend upon understanding and cooperation among the political, spiritual, and intellectual leaders of the world’s major civilizations. In the clash of civilizations, Europe and America will hang together or hang separately. In the greater clash, the global “real clash,” between Civilization and barbarism, the world’s great civilizations, with their rich accomplishments in religion, art, literature, philosophy, science, technology, morality, and compassion, will also hang together or hang separately. In the emerging era, clashes of civilizations are the greatest threat to world peace, and an international order based on civilizations is the surest safeguard against world war.

Patrick Buchanan photo
Jack Kerouac photo
William James photo

„I look forward to a future when acts of war shall be formally outlawed as between civilized peoples.“

—  William James American philosopher, psychologist, and pragmatist 1842 - 1910

1900s, The Moral Equivalent of War (1906)
Contexto: I look forward to a future when acts of war shall be formally outlawed as between civilized peoples.
All these beliefs of mine put me firmly into the anti-military party. But I do not believe that peace either ought to be or will be permanent on this globe, unless the states, pacifically organized, preserve some of the old elements of army-discipline. A permanently successful peace-economy cannot be a simple pleasure-economy. In the more or less socialistic future toward which mankind seems drifting we must still subject ourselves collectively to those severities which answer to our real position upon this only partly hospitable globe. We must make new energies and hardihoods continue the manliness to which the military mind so faithfully clings.

Jacques Maritain photo
Elia M. Ramollah photo
Daniel Patrick Moynihan photo
Albert Camus photo

„Our technical civilization has just reached its greatest level of savagery. We will have to choose, in the more or less near future, between collective suicide and the intelligent use of our scientific conquests.“

—  Albert Camus French author and journalist 1913 - 1960

Between Hell and Reason (1945)
Contexto: The world is what it is, which is to say, nothing much. This is what everyone learned yesterday, thanks to the formidable concert of opinion coming from radios, newspapers, and information agencies. Indeed we are told, in the midst of hundreds of enthusiastic commentaries, that any average city can be wiped out by a bomb the size of a football. American, English, and French newspapers are filled with eloquent essays on the future, the past, the inventors, the cost, the peaceful incentives, the military advantages, and even the life-of-its-own character of the atom bomb.
We can sum it up in one sentence: Our technical civilization has just reached its greatest level of savagery. We will have to choose, in the more or less near future, between collective suicide and the intelligent use of our scientific conquests.
Meanwhile we think there is something indecent in celebrating a discovery whose use has caused the most formidable rage of destruction ever known to man. What will it bring to a world already given over to all the convulsions of violence, incapable of any control, indifferent to justice and the simple happiness of men — a world where science devotes itself to organized murder? No one but the most unrelenting idealists would dare to wonder.

Maria Montessori photo
Constantine P. Cavafy photo

„The days of the future stand in front of us
Like a line of candles all alight —
Golden and warm and lively little candles.“

—  Constantine P. Cavafy Greek poet 1863 - 1933

"Candles" [Κεριά], as translated by Manolis, in Constantine P. Cavafy: Poems (2008) edited by George Amabile

Harry Chapin photo

„And if our future
Lies on the final line
Are we brave enough
To see the signals and the signs?“

—  Harry Chapin American musician 1942 - 1981

I Wonder What Would Happen to this World
Song lyrics, Living Room Suite (1978)

P.G. Wodehouse photo
Nicholas Serota photo
Brian Selznick photo
Al Gore photo

„The survival of the United States of America as we know it is at risk. And even more — if more should be required — the future of human civilization is at stake.“

—  Al Gore 45th Vice President of the United States 1948

A Generational Challenge to Repower America http://www.huffingtonpost.com/al-gore/a-generational-challenge_b_113359.html speech, July 17, 2008.

J. G. Ballard photo
John F. Kennedy photo

„I see little of more importance to the future of our country and our civilization than full recognition of the place of the artist.“

—  John F. Kennedy 35th president of the United States of America 1917 - 1963

1963, Speech at Amherst College
Contexto: The artist, however faithful to his personal vision of reality, becomes the last champion of the individual mind and sensibility against an intrusive society and an officious state. The great artist is thus a solitary figure. He has, as Frost said, a lover's quarrel with the world. In pursuing his perceptions of reality, he must often sail against the currents of his time. This is not a popular role. If Robert Frost was much honored in his lifetime, it was because a good many preferred to ignore his darker truths. Yet in retrospect, we see how the artist's fidelity has strengthened the fibre of our national life. If sometimes our great artist have been the most critical of our society, it is because their sensitivity and their concern for justice, which must motivate any true artist, makes him aware that our Nation falls short of its highest potential. I see little of more importance to the future of our country and our civilization than full recognition of the place of the artist.

Newton Lee photo
James Madison photo

„We have staked the whole future of American civilization, not upon the power of government, far from it. We have staked the future of all of our political institutions upon the capacity of mankind for self-government: upon the capacity of each and all of us to govern ourselves, to control ourselves, to sustain ourselves according to the Ten Commandments of God.“

—  James Madison 4th president of the United States (1809 to 1817) 1751 - 1836

Attributed to Madison by Frederick Nymeyer in Progressive Calvinism: Neighborly Love and Ricardo's Law of Association, January 1958, p. 31. The source is given there as the 1958 calendar of Spiritual Motivation. It subsequently appeared in Rousas John Rushdoony, The Institutes of Biblical Law (1973), p. 541; Jerry Falwell, Listen America! (1980), p. 51; David Barton, The Myth of Separation Between Church and State (1989); and William J. Federer, America's God and Country Encyclopedia of Quotations (1994) p. 411. David Barton has since declared it "unconfirmed" after Madison scholars reported that this statement appears nowhere in the writings or recorded utterances of James Madison. http://www.members.tripod.com/candst/boston2.htm It appears to be an expansion and corruption of Madison's reference (Federalist Papers XXXIX) to "that honourable determination which animates every votary of freedom, to rest all our political experiments on the capacity of mankind for self government."
Misattributed

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