„Religious discord has lost her sting; the cumbrous weapons of theological warfare are antiquated: the field of politics supplies the alchymists of our times with materials of more fatal explosion, and the butchers of mankind no longer travel to another world for instruments of cruelty and destruction.“

—  John Quincy Adams, Oration at Plymouth (1802), Context: Religious discord has lost her sting; the cumbrous weapons of theological warfare are antiquated: the field of politics supplies the alchymists of our times with materials of more fatal explosion, and the butchers of mankind no longer travel to another world for instruments of cruelty and destruction. Our age is too enlightened to contend upon topics, which concern only the interests of eternity; and men who hold in proper contempt all controversies about trifles, except such as inflame their own passions, have made it a common-place censure against your ancestors, that their zeal was enkindled by subjects of trivial importance; and that however aggrieved by the intolerance of others, they were alike intolerant themselves. Against these objections, your candid judgment will not require an unqualified justification; but your respect and gratitude for the founders of the State may boldly claim an ample apology. The original grounds of their separation from the church of England, were not objects of a magnitude to dissolve the bonds of communion; much less those of charity, between Christian brethren of the same essential principles.
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John Quincy Adams5
político estadunidense, 6° presidente dos Estados Unidos da… 1767 - 1848

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„What might have been politically therapeutic at one time may prove politically fatal at another.“

—  Neil Postman American writer and academic 1931 - 2003
Teaching as a Subversive Activity (1969), Context: A fifth kind of semantic awareness has to do with what might be called the "photographic" effects of language. We live in a universe of constant process. Everything is changing in the physical world around us. We ourselves, physically at least, are always changing. Out of the maelstrom of happenings we abstract certain bits to attend to. We snapshot these bits by naming them. Then we begin responding to the names as if they are the bits that we have named, thus obscuring the effects of change. The names we use tend to "fix" that which is named, particularly if the names also carry emotional connotations... There are some semanticists who have suggested that such phrases as "national defense" and "national sovereignty" have been... maintained beyond the date for which they were prescribed. What might have been politically therapeutic at one time may prove politically fatal at another.

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„He [Saddam Hussein] will use those weapons of mass destruction again, as he has ten times since 1983.“

—  Sandy Berger US National Security Advisor 1945 - 2015
(18 February 1998); Quoted on U S News, October 25, 2011 http://www.usnews.com/opinion/blogs/Jamie-Stiehm/2011/10/25/obama-adept-abroad-inept-at-home/comments

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„The first thing we see as we travel round the world is our own filth, thrown into the face of mankind.“

—  Claude Lévi-Strauss, livro Tristes Tropiques
Tristes Tropiques (1955), Context: The order and harmony of the Western world, its most famous achievement, and a laboratory in which structures of a complexity as yet unknown are being fashioned, demand the elimination of a prodigious mass of noxious by-products which now contaminate the globe. The first thing we see as we travel round the world is our own filth, thrown into the face of mankind. Chapter 4 : The Quest for Power, p. 38

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„The travel writer seeks the world we have lost — the lost valleys of the imagination.“

—  Alexander Cockburn Leftist journalist and writer 1941 - 2012
"Bwana Vistas," Harper’s (August 1985), reprinted in Corruptions of Empire (1988).

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„How much longer is the world willing to endure this spectacle of wanton cruelty?“

—  Bertrand Russell logician, one of the first analytic philosophers and political activist 1872 - 1970
1960s, Context: The tragedy of the people of Palestine is that their country was "given" by a foreign power to another people for the creation of a new state. The result was that many hundreds of thousands of innocent people were made permanently homeless. With every new conflict their numbers increased. How much longer is the world willing to endure this spectacle of wanton cruelty? It is abundantly clear that the refugees have every right to the homeland from which they were driven, and the denial of this right is at the heart of the continuing conflict. No people anywhere in the world would accept being expelled en masse from their country; how can anyone require the people of Palestine to accept a punishment which nobody else would tolerate? A permanent just settlement of the refugees in their homeland is an essential ingredient of any genuine settlement in the Middle East. "Message from Bertrand Russell to the International Conference of Parlimentarians in Cairo, February 1970," reprinted in The New York Times (23 February 1970)

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„The world is a nettle; disturb it, it stings.
Grasp it firmly, it stings not.“

—  Robert Bulwer-Lytton, 1st Earl of Lytton English statesman and poet 1831 - 1891
Lucile (1860), Part iii, canto ii. Quoted by Walt Whitman in Roaming in Thought.

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„This understanding is embodied in the canons of world religions and in the works of philosophers from antiquity to our time.“

—  Mikhail Gorbachev General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union 1931
Nobel Address (1991), Context: Preparing for my address I found in an old Russian encyclopedia a definition of "peace" as a "commune" — the traditional cell of Russian peasant life. I saw in that definition the people's profound understanding of peace as harmony, concord, mutual help, and cooperation. This understanding is embodied in the canons of world religions and in the works of philosophers from antiquity to our time.

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„Her intense and pure religiousness took the form of her having equal faith in the existence of another world and in the impossibility of comprehending it in terms of earthly life.“

—  Vladimir Nabokov Russian-American novelist, lepidopterist, professor 1899 - 1977
Speak, Memory: A Memoir (1951), Context: Her intense and pure religiousness took the form of her having equal faith in the existence of another world and in the impossibility of comprehending it in terms of earthly life. All one could do was to glimpse, amid the haze and the chimeras, something real ahead, just as persons endowed with an unusual persistence of diurnal cerebration are able to perceive in their deepest sleep, somewhere beyond the throes of an entangled and inept nightmare, the ordered reality of the waking hour.

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„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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