„An offensive war, I believe to be wrong and would therefore have nothing to do with it“

—  Daniel Morgan, Letter to a Quaker (1798), Context: As to war, I am and always was a great enemy, at the same time a warrior the greater part of my life, and were I young again, should still be a warrior while ever this country should be invaded and I lived — a Defensive war I think a righteous war to Defend my life & property & that of my family, in my own opinion, is right & justifiable in the sight of God. An offensive war, I believe to be wrong and would therefore have nothing to do with it, having no right to meddle with another man's property, his ox or his ass, his man servant or his maid servant or anything that is his. Neither does he have a right to meddle with anything that is mine, if he does I have a right to defend it by force.
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Daniel Morgan
1736 - 1802
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„I can only say that I have always believed in doing everything possible in war to mystify and mislead one’s opponent….“

—  Archibald Wavell, 1st Earl Wavell senior officer of the British Army 1883 - 1950
Introduction by Wavell to… Clarke D. (1948). Seven Assignments. Jonathan Cape. p. 7.

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„The overall intention may be stated simply enough. Before the Second World War I believed in the perfectibility of social man; that a correct structure of society would produce goodwill; and that therefore you could remove all social ills by a reorganisation of society. …. but after the war I did not because I was unable to.“

—  William Golding British novelist, poet, playwright and Nobel Prize for Literature laureate 1911 - 1993
The Hot Gates (1965), Context: The overall intention may be stated simply enough. Before the Second World War I believed in the perfectibility of social man; that a correct structure of society would produce goodwill; and that therefore you could remove all social ills by a reorganisation of society..... but after the war I did not because I was unable to. I had discovered what one man could do to another... I must say that anyone who moved through those years without understanding that man produces evil as a bee produces honey, must have been blind or wrong in the head... I am thinking of the vileness beyond all words that went on, year after year, in the totalitarian states. It is bad enough to say that so many Jews were exterminated in this way and that, so many people liquidated — lovely, elegant word — but there were things done during that period from which I still have to avert my mind less I should be physically sick. They were not done by the headhunters of New Guinea or by some primitive tribe in the Amazon. They were done, skillfully, coldly, by educated men, doctors, lawyers, by men with a tradition of civilization behind them, to beings of their own kind. My own conviction grew that what had happened was that men were putting the cart before the horse. They were looking at the system rather than the people. It seemed to me that man’s capacity for greed, his innate cruelty and selfishness, was being hidden behind a kind of pair of political pants. I believed then, that man was sick — not exceptional man, but average man. I believed that the condition of man was to be a morally diseased creation and that the best job I could do at the time was to trace the connection between his diseased nature and the international mess he gets himself into. To many of you, this will seem trite, obvious, and familiar in theological terms. Man is a fallen being. He is gripped by original sin. His nature is sinful and his state is perilous. I accept the theology and admit the triteness; but what is trite is true; and a truism can become more than a truism when it is a belief passionately held.... I can say in America what I should not like to say at home; which is that I condemn and detest my country's faults precisely because I am so proud of her many virtues. One of our faults is to believe that evil is somewhere else and inherent in another nation. My book was to say you think that now the war is over and an evil thing destroyed, you are safe because you are naturally kind and decent. But I know why the thing rose in Germany. I know it could it could happen in any country. It could happen here. On his motivations to write Lord of the Flies, from his essay "Fable", p. 85

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„If the art of war were nothing but the art of avoiding risks, glory would become the prey of mediocre minds…. I have made all the calculations; fate will do the rest.“

—  Napoleon I of France French general, First Consul and later Emperor of the French 1769 - 1821
Statement at the beginning of the 1813 campaign, as quoted in The Mind of Napoleon (1955) by J. Christopher Herold, p. 45

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„Not all the treasures of the world, so far as I believe, could have induced me to support an offensive war, for I think it murder; but if a thief breaks into my house, burns and destroys my property, and kills or threatens to kill me, or those that are in it, and to "bind me in all cases whatsoever" to his absolute will, am I to suffer it?“

—  Thomas Paine English and American political activist 1737 - 1809
1770s, The American Crisis (1776–1783), Context: It matters not where you live, or what rank of life you hold, the evil or the blessing will reach you all. The far and the near, the home counties and the back, the rich and the poor, will suffer or rejoice alike. The heart that feels not now is dead; the blood of his children will curse his cowardice, who shrinks back at a time when a little might have saved the whole, and made them happy. I love the man that can smile in trouble, that can gather strength from distress, and grow brave by reflection. 'Tis the business of little minds to shrink; but he whose heart is firm, and whose conscience approves his conduct, will pursue his principles unto death. My own line of reasoning is to myself as straight and clear as a ray of light. Not all the treasures of the world, so far as I believe, could have induced me to support an offensive war, for I think it murder; but if a thief breaks into my house, burns and destroys my property, and kills or threatens to kill me, or those that are in it, and to "bind me in all cases whatsoever" to his absolute will, am I to suffer it? What signifies it to me, whether he who does it is a king or a common man; my countryman or not my countryman; whether it be done by an individual villain, or an army of them? If we reason to the root of things we shall find no difference; neither can any just cause be assigned why we should punish in the one case and pardon in the other. Let them call me rebel and welcome, I feel no concern from it; but I should suffer the misery of devils, were I to make a whore of my soul by swearing allegiance to one whose character is that of a sottish, stupid, stubborn, worthless, brutish man. The Crisis No. I.

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„I think she would be stronger on the war on terrorism. I absolutely believe that. … I will campaign for her if it's McCain.“

—  Ann Coulter author, political commentator 1961
2008, Context: If you're looking at substance rather than whether it's an R or D after his name, manifestly, if he's our candidate, then Hillary's gonna be our girl, Sean, because she's more conservative than he is. I think she would be stronger on the war on terrorism. I absolutely believe that. … I will campaign for her if it's McCain. To Sean Hannity on the possibility of on John McCain being the 2008 Republican Party nominee for President, on Hannity & Colmes (31 January 2008) http://youtube.com/watch?v=HuTqgqhxVMc.

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„Changing from the defensive to the offensive, is one of the most delicate operations in war.“

—  Napoleon I of France French general, First Consul and later Emperor of the French 1769 - 1821
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„It's the wrong war in the wrong place at the wrong time.“

—  John F. Kerry politician from the United States 1943
Sept 6, 2004 http://www.nytimes.com/2004/09/07/politics/campaign/07campaign.html?ex=1095912000&en=981cad475582e618&ei=5070&hp

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„So in everything, do to others what you would have them to do to you, for this sums up the war and the prophets.“

—  Bernie Sanders American politician, senator for Vermont 1941
2010s, 2015, Liberty University Speech (14 September 2015), That is the golden rule. Do unto others, what you would have them do to you. That is the golden rule, and it is not very complicated.

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„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“