„Those who think that science is ethically neutral confuse the findings of science, which are, with the activity of science, which is not.“

—  Jacob Bronowski, Context: Tolerance among scientists cannot be based on indifference, it must be based on respect. Respect as a personal value implies, in any society, the public acknowledgements of justice and of due honor. These are values which to the layman seem most remote from any abstract study. Justice, honor, the respect of man for man: What, he asks, have these human values to do with science? [... ] Those who think that science is ethically neutral confuse the findings of science, which are, with the activity of science, which is not. Part 3: "The Sense of Human Dignity", §6 (p. 63–64)
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Jacob Bronowski3
1908 - 1974
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—  Louis Pasteur French chemist and microbiologist 1822 - 1895
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„Anything which uses science as part of its name isn't: political science, creation science, computer science.“

—  Hal Abelson computer scientist 1947
Source: The Nature of Belief http://www.xent.com/FoRK-archive/sept97/0213.html

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„I am among those who think that science has great beauty.“

—  Marie Curie French-Polish physicist and chemist 1867 - 1934
Context: I am among those who think that science has great beauty. A scientist in his laboratory is not only a technician: he is also a child placed before natural phenomena which impress him like a fairy tale. We should not allow it to be believed that all scientific progress can be reduced to mechanisms, machines, gearings, even though such machinery also has its beauty. Neither do I believe that the spirit of adventure runs any risk of disappearing in our world. If I see anything vital around me, it is precisely that spirit of adventure, which seems indestructible and is akin to curiosity. As quoted in Madame Curie : A Biography (1937) by Eve Curie Labouisse, as translated by Vincent Sheean, p. 341 Variant translation: A scientist in his laboratory is not a mere technician: he is also a child confronting natural phenomena that impress him as though they were fairy tales.

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—  Carl Sagan, Cosmos
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„Calculations are to the economic science what bones are to the human body. Without them it will always be a vague and confused science, at the mercy of error and prejudice.“

—  François Quesnay French economist 1694 - 1774
François Quesnay in letter to Mirabeau (Archives Nationales, Ms. 779, 4 bis, p.2 note); as cited in: Richard Van Den Berg and Albert Steenge. "Tableaux and Systèmes. Early French Contributions to Linear Production Models." Cahiers d'économie Politique/Papers in Political Economy 2 (2016): 11-30.