„No word in our language — not even "Socialism"— has been employed more loosely than "Mysticism."“

—  William Ralph Inge, Context: No word in our language — not even "Socialism"— has been employed more loosely than "Mysticism." … The history of the word begins in close connexion with the Greek mysteries. A mystic is one who has been, or is being, initiated into some esoteric knowledge of Divine things, about which he must keep his mouth shut… Christian Mysticism (1899) http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/14596, Preface
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William Ralph Inge6
1860 - 1954
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„Words should be employed as the means, not as the end: language is the instrument, conviction is the work.“

—  Joshua Reynolds English painter, specialising in portraits 1723 - 1792
Discourses on Art, Discourse no. 4; vol. 1, p. 94.

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„Loose language suggests loose thought.“

—  Theodore Dalrymple English doctor and writer 1949
The Social Affairs Unit (2006 - 2008), Victim impact statements represent the sentimentalisation - the Diana-ification - of the criminal justice system, argues Theodore Dalrymple http://www.socialaffairsunit.org.uk/blog/archives/001298.php (December 11, 2006).

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„Anarchy had been a word of fear in many countries for a long time, nowhere more so than in this one; nothing in that time, not even the word "Communism," struck such terror, anger, and hatred into the popular mind; and nobody seemed to understand exactly what Anarchy as a political idea meant any more than they understood Communism, which has muddied the waters to the point that it sometimes calls itself Socialism, at other times Democracy, or even in its present condition, the Republic.“

—  Katherine Anne Porter American journalist, essayist, short story writer, novelist, and political activist 1890 - 1980
The Never-Ending Wrong (1977), Context: Anarchy had been a word of fear in many countries for a long time, nowhere more so than in this one; nothing in that time, not even the word "Communism," struck such terror, anger, and hatred into the popular mind; and nobody seemed to understand exactly what Anarchy as a political idea meant any more than they understood Communism, which has muddied the waters to the point that it sometimes calls itself Socialism, at other times Democracy, or even in its present condition, the Republic. Fascism, Nazism, new names for very ancient evil forms of government — tyranny and dictatorship — came into fashion almost at the same time with Communism; at least the aims of those two were clear enough; at least their leaders made no attempt to deceive anyone as to their intentions. But Anarchy had been here all the nineteenth century, with its sinister offspring Nihilism, and it is a simple truth that the human mind can face better the most oppressive government, the most rigid restrictions, than the awful prospect of a lawless, frontierless world. Freedom is a dangerous intoxicant and very few people can tolerate it in any quantity; it brings out the old raiding, oppressing, murderous instincts; the rage for revenge, for power, the lust for bloodshed. The longing for freedom takes the form of crushing the enemy — there is always the enemy! — into the earth; and where and who is the enemy if there is no visible establishment to attack, to destroy with blood and fire? Remember all that oratory when freedom is threatened again. Freedom, remember, is not the same as liberty.

Ludwig Wittgenstein photo

„For a large class of cases — though not for all — in which we employ the word meaning it can be explained thus: the meaning of a word is its use in the language.“

—  Ludwig Wittgenstein, Philosophical Investigations
Philosophical Investigations (1953), § 43, this has often been quoted as simply: The meaning of a word is its use in the language.

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Abraham Joshua Heschel photo

„Language has been reduced to labels, talk has become double-talk. We are in the process of losing faith in the reality of words.“

—  Abraham Joshua Heschel Polish-American Conservative Judaism Rabbi 1907 - 1972
Moral Grandeur and Spiritual Audacity: Essays (1997), Context: One of the results of the rapid depersonalization of our age is a crisis of speech, profanation of language. We have trifled with the name of God, we have taken the name and the word of the Holy in vain. Language has been reduced to labels, talk has become double-talk. We are in the process of losing faith in the reality of words. Yet prayer can happen only when words reverberate with power and inner life, when uttered as an earnest, as a promise. On the other hand, there is a high degree of obsolescence in the traditional language of the theology of prayer. Renewal of prayer calls for a renewal of language, of cleansing the words, of revival of meanings. The strength of faith is in silence, and in words that hibernate and wait. Uttered faith must come out as a surplus of silence, as the fruit of lived faith, of enduring intimacy. Theological education must deepen privacy, strive for daily renewal of innerness, cultivate ingredients of religious existence, reverence and responsibility. "No Religion is an Island", p. 264

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„I'm no linguist, but I have been told that in the Russian language, there isn't even a word for freedom.“

—  Ronald Reagan American politician, 40th president of the United States (in office from 1981 to 1989) 1911 - 2004

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„Even more than in a poem, it is the aphorism that the word is god.“

—  Emil M. Cioran Romanian philosopher and essayist 1911 - 1995
Drawn and Quartered (1983)

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„There has always been a dance element in my mysticism.“

—  Alan Moore English writer primarily known for his work in comic books 1953
De Abaitua interview (1998), Context: There has always been a dance element in my mysticism. We just think ‘why not’. Music is imposing a state of consciousness by its very nature. If what this Tree of Life is is a hierarchy of different states of consciousness, would it be possible to simulate and stimulate those states of consciousness in the listener by producing the right sorts of music. Is it possible? We don’t know, but we’re working on it.

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„Taste is one of the weaker words in our language. It means a little less than something, a little more than nothing; certainly it conveys no suggestion of potency. It savors of accomplishment, in the fashionable sense, not of power to accomplish in the creative sense.“

—  Louis Sullivan American architect 1856 - 1924
Kindergarten Chats (1918), Context: Taste is one of the weaker words in our language. It means a little less than something, a little more than nothing; certainly it conveys no suggestion of potency. It savors of accomplishment, in the fashionable sense, not of power to accomplish in the creative sense. It expresses a familiarity with what is au courant among persons of so-called culture, of so-called good form. It is essentially a second-hand word, and can have no place in the working vocabulary of those who demand thought and action at first hand. To say that a thing is tasty or tasteful is, practically, to say nothing at all. Ch. 10 : A Roman Temple

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„The English language may hold a more disagreeable combination of words than "The doctor will see you now."“

—  Robert Benchley American comedian 1889 - 1945
Context: The English language may hold a more disagreeable combination of words than "The doctor will see you now." I am willing to concede something to the phrase "Have you anything to say before the current is turned on?" That may be worse for the moment, but it doesn't last so long. For continued, unmitigating depression, I know nothing to equal "The doctor will see you now." But I'm not narrow-minded about it. I'm willing to consider other possibilities. "The Tooth, the Whole Tooth, and Nothing but the Tooth", in Love Conquers All (1922)

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“