„My Lord and my God.“

—  São Tomé, Gospel of John, 20:28
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Joseph Smith, Jr. photo

„O Lord my God!“

—  Joseph Smith, Jr. American religious leader and the founder of the Latter Day Saint movement 1805 - 1844
Cried out by Smith as he fell to his death after being shot by a mob. Doctrine and Covenants, 135:1 (27 June 1844)

John Oldham (poet) photo

„Lord of myself, accountable to none,
But to my conscience, and my God alone.“

—  John Oldham (poet) English satirical poet and translator 1653 - 1683
Satire addressed to a Friend, line 36; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922).

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Nicholas of Cusa photo

„I behold Thee, 0 Lord my God, in a kind of mental trance“

—  Nicholas of Cusa German philosopher, theologian, jurist, and astronomer 1401 - 1464

Anatole France photo

„O Lord, my God, I recognise Thy voice!“

—  Anatole France French writer 1844 - 1924
Context: Satan, piercing space with his keen glance, contemplated the little globe of earth and water where of old he had planted the vine and formed the first tragic chorus. And he fixed his gaze on that Rome where the fallen God had founded his empire on fraud and lie. Nevertheless, at that moment a saint ruled over the Church. Satan saw him praying and weeping. And he said to him: "To thee I entrust my Spouse. Watch over her faithfully. In thee I confirm the right and power to decide matters of doctrine, to regulate the use of the sacraments, to make laws and to uphold purity of morals. And the faithful shall be under obligation to conform thereto. My Church is eternal, and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it. Thou art infallible. Nothing is changed." And the successor of the apostles felt flooded with rapture. He prostrated himself, and with his forehead touching the floor, replied: "O Lord, my God, I recognise Thy voice! Thy breath has been wafted like balm to my heart. Blessed be Thy name. Thy will be done on Earth, as it is in Heaven. Lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil." Ch. XXXV

„My lords, we are vertebrate animals, we are mammalia! My learned friend's manner would be intolerable in Almighty God to a black beetle.“

—  William Henry Maule British politician 1788 - 1858
On the Authority of Lord Coleridge; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 493. What 'the Autority of Lord Coleridge' is worth can be questioned also for this quote, as P.G. Wodehouse quoted the same thing in not entirely the same words. Wodehouse cannot have used 'Hoyt's New Cyclopedia...' when he did so, as he quoted it about ten years before that cyclopedia was published. He wrote (in the short story 'The Man Upstairs'): ' '"My learned friend's manner would be intolerable in an emperor to a black-beetle,"' quoted Beverley.' So the question is: was it 'the Almighty God' or rather 'an emperor'? Was Lord Coleridge right or rather P.G. Wodehouse? Or did Wodehouse quote someone else, and in that case was the one quoted by Berverley according to Wodehouse using the quoted text before or after William Maule did use the slightly different text? And if so, who was the other? And did the second of them know the first had used the slightly different text and used most of it, or did he (the second) 'invent' almost the same sentence all by himself? Or is it just that Wodehouse' publisher feared part of his customers would be offended by the use of 'the Almighty God' in this sentence, as they would consider this usage to be blasphemy, so he changed it to just a highly ranked human, who was at least less sacred, and probably even unpopular (the German and Austrian emperors) with his (mainly British and American) customers at that time (just before the First World War)?

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Henry Ward Beecher photo
Karen Blixen photo
Julian of Norwich photo

„In God there may be no wrath, as to my sight: for our good Lord endlessly hath regard to His own worship and to the profit of all that shall be saved.“

—  Julian of Norwich English theologian and anchoress 1342 - 1416
Context: In God there may be no wrath, as to my sight: for our good Lord endlessly hath regard to His own worship and to the profit of all that shall be saved. With might and right He withstandeth the Reproved, the which of malice and wickedness busy them to contrive and to do against God’s will. Also I saw our Lord scorn his malice and set at nought his unmight; and He willeth that we do so. For this sight I laughed mightily, and that made them to laugh that were about me, and their laughing was a pleasure to me.

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William the Silent photo

„My God, my God, have mercy on me, and on my poor people!“

—  William the Silent stadtholder of Holland, Zeeland and Utrecht, leader of the Dutch Revolt 1533 - 1584
Last words, as quoted in De Vader des Vaderlands (1941) by W. Berkelbach van der Sprenkel, p. 29 Variants: O my God, have mercy on this poor people. My God, have pity on my soul; my God, have pity on this poor people. My God, have mercy on my soul and on these poor people. My God, have pity on my soul; I am badly wounded. My God, have pity on my soul and on this poor people!

Julian of Norwich photo
Saint Patrick photo

„I confess to my Lord and do not blush in his sight, because I am not lying; from the time when I came to know him in my youth, the love of God and fear of him increased in me, and right up until now, by God's favour, I have kept the faith.“

—  Saint Patrick 5th-century Romano-British Christian missionary and bishop in Ireland 385 - 461
Context: So I hope that I did as I ought, but I do not trust myself as long as I am in this mortal body, for he is strong who strives daily to turn me away from the faith and true holiness to which I aspire until the end of my life for Christ my Lord, but the hostile flesh is always dragging one down to death, that is, to unlawful attractions. And I know in part why I did not lead a perfect life like other believers, but I confess to my Lord and do not blush in his sight, because I am not lying; from the time when I came to know him in my youth, the love of God and fear of him increased in me, and right up until now, by God's favour, I have kept the faith.

Clive Staples Lewis photo

„Not my idea of God, but God.“

—  Clive Staples Lewis Christian apologist, novelist, and Medievalist 1898 - 1963

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